5 additional deaths, more than 100 new cases reported by ISDH

first_img Google+ This undated electron microscope image made available by the U.S. National Institutes of Health in February 2020 shows the Novel Coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Also known as 2019-nCoV, the virus causes COVID-19. The sample was isolated from a patient in the U.S. (NIAID-RML) In its biggest single day leap yet Indiana added more deaths from COVID-19 and more than 100 new confirmed cases. The numbers of deaths in the Hoosier state is now up to 12 from the 7 reported on Monday. The latest numbers show Elkhart and LaPorte Counties unchanged, but St. Joseph County with 15. However, a release from the St. Joseph County Health department yesterday identified 17 cases. Marion County continues to report the most cases now with 161.The full release is below:INDIANAPOLIS —The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) today reported 107 new positive cases of COVID-19, bringing to 365 the number of Hoosiers diagnosed through ISDH, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and private laboratories. Twelve Hoosiers have died.A total of 2,931 tests have been reported to ISDH to date, up from 1,960 on Monday.Marion County had the most new cases, at 51. The complete list of counties with cases is included in the ISDH COVID-19 dashboard at www.coronavirus.in.gov, which will be updated daily at 10 a.m. Cases are listed by county of residence. Private lab reporting may be delayed and will be reflected in the map and count when results are received at ISDH.The dashboard also has been updated to remove a previously counted case in Hancock County that was erroneously reported to ISDH as a positive and to shift the county of residence for three others, giving Brown County its first case, moving one case from Hancock to Hamilton County and moving a Wayne County case to Fayette County.Additional updates on the state’s response to the COVID-19 outbreak may be provided later today.You can find the latest map from ISDH here Facebook WhatsApp Twitter By Carl Stutsman – March 24, 2020 0 339 5 additional deaths, more than 100 new cases reported by ISDH Twitter Pinterest Previous articleIndiana ranks low in states taking action against COVID-19Next articleREAL Services providing resources to elderly during coronavirus pandemic Carl Stutsman Pinterest WhatsApp CoronavirusIndianaLocalNewsSouth Bend Market Facebook Google+last_img read more

Eat More Fish.

first_img“More specific guidelines are provided for those with elevated lipids, heart disease, diabetes, insulin resistance, congestive heart failure and kidney disease,” Freeman said.Vitamin supplements still aren’t recommended. “The guidelines also suggest caution following fad diets like high-protein,” Freeman said.The “Revised 2000 American Heart Association Dietary Guidelines” and the consumer booklet, “An Eating Plan for Healthy Americans,” are available at www.americanheart.org/dietaryguidelines. An overall healthy eating pattern. “The guidelines recommend we eat five or more servings of fruits and vegetables,” Freeman said, “and six or more servings of grain products per day.” Meals should include fat-free and low-fat dairy products, legumes, poultry, lean meats and at least two servings of fish (especially fatty fish like salmon and tuna) per week.A healthy body weight. Use commonsense suggestions, such as don’t eat too much or drink too much alcohol. Also, limit fat intake to less than 30 percent of your total calories, and limit high-sugar, nutrient-poor, calorie-dense foods. Exercise, too, on most days of the week.A desirable cholesterol level. Limit foods containing saturated fats, trans fats and cholesterol. Limit cholesterol to 300 milligrams per day unless you’re at high risk. Then keep it to 200 milligrams per day.A normal blood pressure. Limit salt intake to less than 6 grams per day (2,400 milligrams of sodium). That’s slightly more than 1 teaspoon a day. The consumer booklet is also at the local AHA office.center_img The American Heart Association’s new guidelines are designed to help reduce heart-disease risk with healthier foods and less heart-threatening lifestyles, experts say. Among the recommendations: eat more fish to fight high cholesterol.”The new guidelines are easier to use,” said Janine Freeman, an Extension Service nutritionist with the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “They stress an overall eating pattern rather than watching specific percentages of dietary fat or other nutrients.”The revised guidelines include achieving and maintaining:last_img read more

Revisions to certification appeal process being discussed

first_imgRevisions to certification appeal process being discussed September 15, 2003 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular News Revisions to certification appeal process being discussed Senior EditorA proposed revision of the certification appeal process has been referred to the Program Evaluation Committee, but several Bar Board of Governors members have questioned a premise of the change – keeping peer reviews confidential.The board’s Certification Plan Appeals Committee (CPAC) and the Board of Legal Specialization and Education have proposed doing away with CPAC (which takes appeals from BLSE decisions) and subsequent appeals to the board. Instead, a new committee would be created and appeals would go directly from it to the Supreme Court.The sticking point between the two is CPAC proposed that the new committee be composed entirely of board members, a majority of whom are certified. BLSE proposed that a majority of the committee be nonboard members. The board considered the plans at its August 22 meeting in Clearwater Beach.CPAC Chair David Rothman said the committee has had problems handling appeals where certification or recertification was denied because of peer reviews.The committee found it difficult to determine if the denial was arbitrary or capricious, as set out in Bar rules, because it could not see the confidential reviews. BLSE balked when CPAC suggested making the confidential peer reviews available to both the committee and the board when they get peer review appeals.The compromise, he said, was to create the new committee, ending appeals to the board, and give the new panel access to the peer reviews.But some board members said they were troubled that no change would be made to the rule that prohibits appealing lawyers from seeing the peer reviews that caused the denial of their certification.“How is an applicant expected to prosecute an appeal without looking at the reasons for the appeal?” board member Frank Angones asked.Board member Louis Kwall questioned how the board could consider a procedural change without looking at the underlying confidentiality. “How can we send them [to the new committee] without giving the applicants the right to see them and to defend themselves?” he asked.Board member Hank Coxe rejected the suggestion the only issue before the board was the makeup of the proposed new appellate committee. “The whole train is driven by the revelation of peer review and the failure to disclose,” he said. “So why is Lou Kwall’s question and Frank Angones’ question not the real issue?”BLSE Chair Jeff Cohen and Tallahassee attorney Tom Ervin, who represents the BLSE on appeals, said peer review confidentiality has always been part of the process, and that the confidentiality is important to the certification system.BLSE has been reluctant to share any peer reviews above the BLSE level because those appeals are supposed to focus only on procedural issues, Cohen said, and the proposed new committee is a compromise so peer reviews won’t have to be shown to the entire board when it gets a peer review-based appeal.“Effective peer review is just critical to certification. . . and peer review can only be effective if confidentiality is maintained,” Ervin said.He also argued that if someone loses an appeal, the loss of certification does not affect their right to practice, nor is it a disciplinary sanction. In addition, when a certification committee is considering rejecting certification because of negative peer reviews, it contacts the attorney first to allow him or her to submit more names for peer review, Ervin said.Bar President Miles McGrane said since the board did not have the proposed rule necessary to make the change, it was best to send the proposal to the Program Evaluation Committee for more study. That included the dispute over the new appellate committee’s makeup.Rothman said CPAC favored having only board members, since they are elected by Bar members and CPAC is entirely made up of board members. If the majority is not board members, the meetings would be unlikely to be held in conjunction with board meetings which would place additional time demands on the minority board members, he said.Ervin said the BLSE thought it was better to separate the adjudicative function of appeals from the board’s legislative functions. He also said it could be difficult with some board members getting confidential information not available to all board members, and that handling the appeals could be a significant additional burden to board work.Bar Executive Director John F. Harkness, Jr., noted that the Bar’s annual rule amendment package, which would include the change in the certification appellate process, won’t be submitted to the Supreme Court until at least January.last_img read more

Fast-track planning tackles urban decay

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Syracuse flashes balanced attack in 61-53 win over Clemson

first_imgIt was an unfamiliar situation for Syracuse as Marek Dolezaj pushed transition. He pulled up near the top of the key and fired a bounce pass to a cutting Oshae Brissett from the left wing.Brissett caught the pass in stride and slammed it home, throwing his hands up as the Carrier Dome crowd erupted and the Orange took an 11-point first-half lead.In its conference home opener, Syracuse (11-4, 2-0 Atlantic Coast) started hot and never looked back, controlling nearly every aspect of the game in a 61-53 win over Clemson (10-5, 0-2) on Wednesday night. For all but 36 seconds, Syracuse sat in the driver’s seat, never trailing. But unlike other big wins this season where Syracuse’s scoring trio — Tyus Battle, Brissett and Elijah Hughes — ran the offense, the Orange uncharacteristically flashed a balanced attack, one that gave them the momentum it needed to win its second-straight conference matchup.It came just four days after Syracuse’s win on the road against Notre Dame, when head coach Jim Boeheim addressed the media about his big three.“They have to show up,” the 43-year head coach said. “If they don’t we aren’t going to win. We depend on those guys.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhile all three players combined for 35 points against Clemson, shots did not fall as often. Brissett and Battle missed all 10 of their shots from 3 and Hughes shot just 40 percent from the floor.Yet for the first time all year, Syracuse looked comfortable the entire game on its home court. For the second time this season, Frank Howard found himself in double-figures and shot 50 percent from the floor. Dolezaj added 10 points and nailed a pair of 3s, too.“I think (the offense is) really deadly (with four or five scorers),” Dolezaj said, who shot 50 percent from 3. “Usually last year we only had three players who could score. And now we have four, maybe five. We are really getting better.”It gave a glimpse at the potential Syracuse’s offense has, one that wasn’t balanced in any of SU’s nonconference slate, nor its ACC opener at Notre Dame. Brissett, Battle and Hughes accounted for 58 of the Orange’s 72 points in that win.There wasn’t anything different about the offense. SU kept firing 3s despite shooting 23 percent from deep, an area its struggled in all season — outside of Notre Dame. But instead of losing on that precedent, however, SU attacked the paint. The five starters combined for a 62 percent clip from inside the arc, and Bourama Sidibe added a make off the bench.Tony Coffield | Contributing Photographer“No one had a huge night,” said Battle, who finished with 12 points and three assists. “Thought we were all just being aggressive and looking for our shot and trying to make something happen on the offensive end. And that’s how we have to play.”Syracuse’s defense held its own the entire game, stymieing a Clemson offense that entered Wednesday ranked 10th in the country in 2-point field goal percentage, per kenpom.com. Sidibe, just days after making two huge defensive stops against Notre Dame, blocked three shots in 16 minutes.All the while, Paschal Chukwu, SU’s former starting center, sat on the bench in his long-sleeved orange shirt and white headband. Dolezaj and Sidibe rotated in and out for each other. For the first time all season, Chukwu didn’t log a single minute and Boeheim added postgame he was not battling injury.There were times when Clemson had an opportunity to claw its way back into the game, though. Early in the second half, the Tigers made back-to-back 3s to cut the deficit to just two possessions. Soon after, SU flashed a full-court press to combat the Tigers’ slight momentum shift.A Clemson turnover then resulted in a Dolezaj 3 from the right wing. On the next play, another turnover ended up with a Hughes 3 from the top of the key. Each time, the Carrier Dome crowd grew louder.Syracuse eviscerated the Clemson momentum by creating turnovers. The Tigers rank 273th in the country in offensive turnover percentage and turn the ball over 14.6 times per game. By game’s end, Clemson had 17 turnovers. Two came in the opening minutes, with Dolezaj drawing a pair of charges against the Clemson big men. There were strips inside the paint and errant passes trying to push the tempo, trying to beat SU full-court press that formed mid game.“One of the keys when we got (up) six, we pressed,” Boeheim said. “We got two big turnovers and scores and went up 12. The press served as purpose … and that gave us enough separation.”Whatever Clemson tried, Syracuse had an answer for. The Tigers shot a season-worst 35.8 percent from the field and couldn’t figure out how to buck its season-long 3-point woes.While Syracuse’s offense regressed slightly in the second half, the Orange never lost control, staying the course as an eight-point halftime lead turned into an eight-point win.After four nonconference losses, the Orange stumbled into ACC play with added importance on each game. No SU team has ever made the NCAA Tournament with four nonconference losses. Starting off conference play with a pair of wins became necessary for a Syracuse team beginning to find its groove. And through the efforts of its rarely-seen balanced attack on Wednesday, the Orange may have help outside of their scoring trio.“Takes a lot of pressure off our main scorers,” said Brissett. “We have guys that can really come in and make a spark.” Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on January 9, 2019 at 10:15 pm Contact Charlie: [email protected] | @charliedisturcolast_img read more