Pink Talking Fish Plays ‘Dark Side,’ Welcomes Special Guests On Concert Cruises

first_imgFan favorite tribute act Pink Talking Fish has had a busy couple of weeks on the water, bringing their unique synthesis of Pink Floyd, Talking Heads, and Phish‘s material to four separate concert cruises around the northeast.On July 8th, the band played two separate two-set cruises aboard The Jewel on NYC’s East River. The first cruise saw the band tackle Pink Floyd’s iconic album Dark Side Of The Moon in its entirety. This marked the first time Pink Talking Fish has played a set of just one of the three bands it covers, though it also served as a subtle Phish reference, who once played the full album live themselves (11/2/98). The show featured Elise Testone on vocals for “The Great Gig In The Sky”, as well as several other songs during the second set. The second NYC cruise featured the Turkuaz horns section for a two-set dance party that raged into the early hours of the morning. This past Saturday, July 16th, Pink Talking Fish took to the waters of Lake Champlain in Vermont, and featured a sit-in from Seth Yacavone Band bassist Alex Budney on a super funky version of Talking Heads’ “Houses In Motion” from their 1980 album Remain In Light. Finally, the band hit the dirty waters of Boston, MA on Sunday Afternoon with support from Tom Hamilton’s American Babies. Hamilton also sat in with the band on extended versions of Talking Heads’ “Pull Up The Roots” (Speaking In Tongues) and Floyd’s “Young Lust” (The Wall). The special guest star of the cruise, however, was PTF bassist Eric Goulds’ 4 year old daughter, Zia Mei, who got on stage with a bring red guitar in hand and sang with the band on “Quinn The Eskimo”. Full Audio of both NYC Cruises courtesy of Keith Litzenberger can be found below:Video of PTF Bassist, Eric Gould’s, daughter joining the band for “Quinn The Eskimo” courtesy of Benny Tucker can be seen here. Video of Tom Hamilton sitting in with PTF for “Pull Up The Roots” >”Young Lust” courtesy of Benny Tucker can be seen here.After an action-packed couple of weeks on the water, Pink Talking Fish heads to San Francisco tomorrow, July 19th, for a Phish aftershow at MEZZANINE. CRUISE SETLISTS:July 8th, 2016 – Rocks Off Concert Cruises, New York, NY, 7pm Cruise:Set 1: (Dark Side Of The Moon) Speak To Me > Breathe > On The Run > Time > Great Gig In The Sky* > Money > Us And Them** > Any Colour You Like > Brain Damage > EclipseSet 2: Lengthwise***, Moma Dance > Wild Wild Life, Have A Cigar* > If I Could*, TakeMe To The River*, Dogs > Mike’s Song > This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody)*, Fearless**** > Simple > Life During Wartime* > Weekapaug Groove*w/ Elise Testone on vocals; **w/ Waste tease; ***performed accapella while the boat was rocking particularly hard due to big waves; ****w/ Roggae and Prince Caspian teasesJuly 8th, 2016 – Rocks Off Concert Cruises, New York, NY, 11pm Cruise:Set 1: In The Flesh* > Bathtub Gin* > Burning Down The House, Run Like Hell, Gumbo, Nothing But Flowers, One Of These Days > Kung** > One Of These Days, Wolfman’s Brother > Crosseyed And PainlessSet 2: 2001*** > Another Brick In The Wall > Psycho Killer > Another Brick In The Wall > Tweezer > Houses In Motion**** > Young Lust > Suzy Greenberg >Girlfriend Is Better > Tweezer RepriseE1: Quinn The Eskimo > Character ZeroE2: Cities*No Horns; **”Kuaz” instead of Kung; ***w/ Manteca tease; ****w/ Stash teaseJuly 16th, 2016 – Lake Champlain Concert Cruise, Burlington, VTSet 1: Waves > Run Like Hell > Slippery People > Moma Dance > Slippery People, Have A Cigar > This Must Be The Place (Naive Melody), Shine On You Crazy Diamond, Divided Sky > Once In A Lifetime > Divided Sky > Somewhere Over The Rainbow > Divided SkySet 2: Nothing But Flowers* > My Friend My Friend, Dogs > Pull Up The Roots > Time, Carini > Houses In Motion**, Dogs > Character Zero*w/ Ass Handed tease; **w/ Alex Budney on bass, Fiyo On The Bayou teaseJuly 17th, 2016 – Rock On! Concert Cruise, Boston MASetlist: Punch You In The Eye > Life During Wartime > Breathe, Quinn The Eskimo*, Take Me To The River, Fearless** > The Curtain > Pull Up The Roots*** > Young Lust***, Waves > Psycho Killer > Pigs (3 Different Ones) > Bug > Crosseyed And Painless > Eclipse*w/ Zia Mei Gould on guitar and vocals; **w/ Prince Caspian tease; ***w/ Tom Hamilton on guitarlast_img read more

How To Cut A Hole In Sheetrock For An Electrical Outlet With Alure Home Improvements

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Sponsored Content Brought To You By Alure Home ImprovementsDo you want to add an outlet to your home but you’re worried that you might be unable to cut a hole in the wall?Fear not, because Doug Cornwell, the chief operating officer of Alure Home Improvements, shows you how easy it is to create the space you need in this recent installment of Alure Home Improvements’ “60-Second Fix: How to Cut a Hole for an Outlet in 60 Seconds.”Here, the goal is simple. He’s recently installed a new double-switch for the lights, and now he wants to add an electrical outlet nearby for the plugs. He demonstrates how to cut through the finished Sheetrock without making a big ordeal out of it so you can simply insert an electrical outlet box right into the hole.The key to this process is that the wall is already finished. The Sheetrock has been installed and painted; the underlying wall studs are covered up so you can’t access them. This distinction is important because it determines what kind of electrical box is suitable for installation.“Part one is getting the wire there,” he explains. “The other part is cutting the hole out so you can put the box in. Today I’m going to show you how to cut the box out.”Cornwell uses what is called an “old work” or “retrofit” PVC outlet box, which means that the plastic box is not intended for new construction projects.“The walls are closed,” Cornwell explains here. “They’re not open.”He holds the plastic blue box, and recommends that you make sure it’s up to code in your area, which you can do when you’re at your local hardware store.Generally, these electrical boxes come in two kinds: plastic or metal. The plastic boxes are easier for the amateur handyman to handle because they’re lighter than metal and they’re also cheaper.“First thing you want to do is determine the location of the hole,” Cornwell advises.As he shows here, you want to keep the outlet at approximately the same height as the switch for aesthetic purposes and convenience. Take the box and place it firmly against the wall with one hand so you can outline the straight edges with a pencil. Carefully mark all four sides of the box on the wall.“This way you know the area you want to cut out,” he says.You can cut the hole out in several ways. For this job, he wields a small keyhole-type Sheetrock saw, which can cost between $5 and $10. Use whatever tool you’re comfortable with, because this task is not too time-consuming and the hole is manageably small.The keyhole saw is built to penetrate the wall and enable you to perform the in-and-out sawing motion easily. Use the blade to follow along the pencil lines carefully. Try to be as exact as possible because you don’t want to leave an unnecessarily wide gap. When you come to the corner, carefully remove the blade so you don’t tear the wall surface, and then start on the other side.Once you have the little section of the wallboard almost completely cut out, make sure you hold onto the piece so it won’t fall behind the wall.Now comes the installation of the electrical box.As Cornwell points out, the plastic box has two corner screws, one for the top and one for the bottom. Tightening each screw moves a little wing-like flap attached to the back of the box and starts to draw it up until it touches the other side of the Sheetrock and locks in place. These plastic tabs are supposed to act as clamps as they flip into action but they can be rather flimsy flappers, so don’t take them for granted.“You want to go slow with this,” Cornwell says. “You don’t want to go too fast because you just want it to be snug up against the back of the wall.”Done properly, it locks up the box’s top corner and bottom corner.After you’re ready, you can place the box into the wall, line up the screws, and tighten them accordingly.“Once you see the screw start to pull further into the box, stop,” says Cornwell. “You don’t want to pull it through the Sheetrock. That’s it. It’s in.”Click here to learn more about Alure Home ImprovementsTo make sure he’s done, Cornwell prods all four sides with his fingers to make sure the electrical box won’t wiggle.See how simple that was? Thanks to Alure Home Improvements, cutting a hole in Sheetrock is as easy as 1-2-3!last_img read more