String Cheese Wraps Up Montana Run With Beatles, Johnny Cash Covers & More

first_imgAfter more than a decade, The String Cheese Incident made their triumphant return to the great state of Montana for two nights of jamming music. With a great opening night in the books, the band returned for a powerful finale with a number of 2016 debuts, some great covers and more!The band opened up with “Close Your Eyes,” and brought out “Indian Creek” for the first time of the year. They also featured two songs from their new SCI Sound Lab project in the first set, “Sweet Spot” and “Believe.” One of the big highlights from the show was the “Birdland > Wheel Hoss > Birdland” that opened set two, but 2016 debut covers of The Beatles’ “She Came In Through The Bathroom Window” and Johnny Cash’s “Ring Of Fire” really helped make this show one to remember. They closed out the run with the ever-fitting “How Mountain Girls Can Love,” an ode to the mountainous state of Montana.Check out the full setlist below, courtesy of String Cheese (Twitter). Setlist: The String Cheese Incident at Big Sky Brewing Company, Missoula, MTSet One: Close Your Eyes, Little Hands > Indian Creek, Sweet Spot, Wake Up > Pack It Up > BelieveSet Two: Birdland > Wheel Hoss > Birdland,  Outside and Inside, Falling Through The Cracks > She Came In Through The Bathroom Window > Rivertrance, Piece Of Mine > BeautifulEncore: Ring Of FireEncore 2: How Mountain Girls Can Love[Photo via SCI on Facebook]last_img read more

Cicely Tyson, purposeful and pioneering actor, dead at 96

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — Cicely Tyson, the pioneering Black actor who earned an Oscar nomination for her role as the sharecropper’s wife in “Sounder,” won a Tony Award in 2013 at age 88 and touched TV viewers’ hearts in “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,” has died. She was 96. A onetime model, Tyson began her screen career with bit parts but gained fame in the early 1970s when Black women were finally starting to get starring roles. She earned an honorary Oscar in 2018 and won two Emmys for playing the 110-year-old former slave in the 1974 television drama “The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.”last_img

Heavy and Incompatible Drinking Can Increase the Chances of Divorce

first_imgScience Daily 5 Feb 2013High levels of drinking have repeatedly been shown to predict divorce. The most cited explanation for this is that excessive alcohol use disrupts daily tasks and functioning, and increases spousal conflicts. A study of the effects of drinking among husbands versus wives, and of similar versus dissimilar drinking in couples, has found that both level of drinking and compatibility in drinking can have an influence on divorce.Results will be published in the May 2013 issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research and are currently available at Early View. “On average, divorced people drink more than married people,” said Fartein Ask Torvik, a researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health as well as corresponding author for the study. “To some extent, this is due to increased drinking after a divorce, but people who drink heavily also have a higher risk of experiencing a divorce, so heavy drinking likely interferes fundamentally with the quality of marriage.”…”Essentially, the more people drink, the higher is the risk of divorce,” said Torvik. “In addition, the risk of divorce is lowered if the spouses drink approximately the same amount of alcohol. This is not only true for those who drink excessively — there is also a reduced risk of divorce if both spouses abstain totally from alcohol. Also, we found heavy drinking among women to be more strongly associated with divorce than heavy drinking among men.””This latter finding is of major interest,” said Major. “For instance, the risk of divorce is estimated to be tripled when the husband’s level drinking is low and the wife’s drinking is heavy, compared with couples where both drink lightly.””There are several possible explanations for this,” said Torvik. “One of them is that women in general seem to be more strongly affected by heavy drinking than men are. Thus, heavy-drinking women may be more impaired than heavy-drinking men. It is, however, important to note that heavy drinking is much less common among women than among men.””Heavy drinking among women is also less acceptable than among men in our society,” said Major. “A wife’s heavy drinking probably also interferes more with general family life — that is, the caring role of the mother, upbringing of children, etc.http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130205162519.htmlast_img read more