Watch Warren Haynes Lead Opening Night Of The Last Waltz 40th Anniversary Tribute Tour

first_imgThe Last Waltz officially ended The Band’s career in November of 1976, though the performance would ultimately spark the musical flames of an entire subsequent generation. There is perhaps no greater evidence of that than the recently announced The Last Waltz 40 tour, which began in Florida last night as a celebration of the show’s 40th anniversary.Granted, it’s technically been 41 years since the show was played, but when you recruit musicians like Warren Haynes, Don Was, Michael McDonald, Terence Higgins, Jamey Johnson and more or the occasion, any time all of their schedules are clear is an appropriate time to honor The Band. And honor they did, pulling out all the punches for hours upon hours of great music.Opening night took place at the Hard Rock Casino in Hollywood, FL, featuring the unmistakeable songs that propelled The Band into the spotlight, like “Cripple Creek,” “The Shape I’m In” and countless more. Fortunately, there are a number of fan shot videos of the performance to capture the essence of the night.“Up On Cripple Creek”“The Shape I’m In”“Stagefright”“Life Is A Carnival”“It Makes No Difference”“Way Down South In New Orleans”The Last Waltz 40th tour continues throughout the end of January into February. See the tour schedule below.January 23 – Clearwater, FL @ Ruth Eckerd HallJanuary 24 – Atlanta, GA @ Woodruff Arts CenterJanuary 25 – Nashville, TN @ Ryman AuditoriumJanuary 27 – Red Bank, NJ @ Count Basie Theatre (Jamey Johnson not scheduled to appear)January 28 – Boston, MA @ Orpheum Theatre (Jamey Johnson not scheduled to appear)January 29 – Philadelphia, PA @ Verizon Hall/Kimmel CenterJanuary 31 – Toronto Canada @ Sony CentreFebruary 2 – Albany, NY @ Palace TheatreFebruary 3 – Westbury, NY @ Theatre at WestburyFebruary 4 – Washington DC @ The Theater at MGM National Harborlast_img read more

The Safe Center LI Combines Help for Domestic, Sex Crime Victims

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Safe Center LI, which is located at 15 Grumman Road, Bethpage, was officially unveiled Tuesday.Two like-minded nonprofit agencies that help victims of different types of abuse officially merged Tuesday into The Safe Center LI, a facility where victims of sexual or domestic violence can seek assistance.After about a decade of discussions, the Nassau County Coalition Against Domestic Violence and The Coalition Against Child Abuse & Neglect—two agencies that have been around for more than three decades each—combined their resources to create a collaborative program that transforms how they care for victims.“Co-locating would give us the opportunity to coordinate services to families,” said Sandy Oliva, co-executive director of Safe Center LI, who previously served as the executive director of the Nassau County Coalition Against Domestic Violence. The new venture is a “truly mission-driven endeavor,” she said.Safe Center LI’s programs include child advocacy, a 24/7 multilingual hotline, legal counseling, mental health, rape and sexual assault services, emergency and transitional housing, group work services and education outreach.Joining nonprofit officials in announcing the merger was Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano, whose wife, Linda, has advocated for the group in the past, and Nassau County District Attorney Kathleen Rice, whose office works closely with the group when victims of such crimes turn to the agency for help.“It’s not just about punishing the bad guys and holding them accountable,” Rice said, noting that the collaboration between the two groups provides critical support that her office, and many other governmental organizations cannot provide. “You cannot overstate the significance of a facility like this.”When Rice was first elected in 2005, victims were “shuttled from building to building,” which was “traumatizing to those very vulnerable people,” she said.Safe Center LI officials also touted the work of the Nassau County Police Department, whose Special Victim Squad detectives are housed at the facility. The unit has nine detectives and two supervisors that investigate sexual assault and related cases. An Assistant District Attorney from Rice’s office is also often on site.With the merger official, Safe Center LI will soon begin to focus on sex trafficking and helping the county monitor sex offenders, said Cynthia Scott, co-director of Safe Center LI, and the former executive director of the Coalition Against Child Abuse & Neglect.The overall goal is to be a safe haven to all people, no matter race, gender or age, officials said.Though it’s located in Nassau, the group’s directors said Suffolk County residents are welcome to call the hotline and seek out help, but they may be better off reaching out to similar agencies in Suffolk, especially if a crime has been committed.One such group, the Suffolk County Child Advocacy Center at The Mary & Pat Bagnato Place for Kids, similarly aids families and victims of abuse on eastern Long Island.Safe Center LI is located at 15 Grumman Road, Bethpage, NY.last_img read more

Quad City Speedway hosts Aug. 3 Weedon Memorial

first_imgEAST MOLINE, Ill. – Quad City Speedway hosts its ninth annual Ronnie Weedon Memorial on Sunday, Aug. 3, with a $1,000 to win, minimum $150 to start feature for IMCA Xtreme Motor Sports Modifieds. Sponsored by J & J Camper Sales, the draw/redraw event is a qualifier for the 2015 Fast Shafts All-Star Invitational. At stake are IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National, Belleville Motorsports North Central Region and Allstar Performance State, but no local track points.Grandstand admission is $12 for adults, $5 for kids ages 6-12 and free for five and under. The entry fee for Modifieds is $40 and pit passes are $30. Pit gates at East Moline open at 3 p.m. and the grandstand opens at 3:30 p.m. The draw ends and the drivers’ meeting starts at 5 p.m. Hot laps are at 5:15 p.m. with racing to follow.More information about the Reinhart Memorial is available at the www.qcspeedwayracing.com website by emailing [email protected]last_img read more

Atlanta Braves starter Kris Medlen to play against Dodgers, not with them

first_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error ATLANTA — Kris Medlen dreamed of a playoff scenario with the Dodgers, all right.Just not exactly like the one in which he’ll have a starring role.Medlen, who grew up in Cerritos, figured he’d be an infielder for the Dodgers. He envisioned the wrong team and wrong position, but Medlen sure is in great position for the Braves as their Game 1 starter against the Dodgers in the National League Division Series on Thursday.“It’s a pretty cool feeling being able to play against them during the regular season,” Medlen said. “I think (there’s) the fact that I’ve had a couple years in the big leagues to kind of get over that love for the Dodgers. “We’ve missed him twice this year, the both times we played this series, but I think our team, with the confidence we have, he missed us,” Medlen said.Medlen will miss Matt Kemp — out for the postseason with a left ankle injury — but will need to keep Hanley Ramirez, Yasiel Puig and Adrian Gonzalez and company in check if he’s to hand things over to the back of a stingy Braves bullpen.Medlen was the unlikeliest of Game 1 starters four months ago, but he is the Braves’ best chance to go toe-to-toe with Kershaw.“Medlen, he’s earned it,” Atlanta manager Fredi Gonzalez said. “He’s a guy that pitched a big game for us last year. He pitched that St. Louis Cardinals play-in game, so he’s got that going for him.”Medlen started for the Braves last year in its 6-3 loss to St. Louis in the NL wild-card playoff game. Medlen gave up just two earned runs in 6 1/3 innings, but Atlanta had three errors. He was 10-1 in 12 starts in 2012 before that game.“I think the buildup and anxiety of playing in a Game 7-type of situation last year didn’t get to me,” Medlen said. “I just thought it was more than a regular-season game than it typically is.“I think we’re in a different situation this year. We have a chance to win a series instead of one game, although every game matters.”He’s caught the attention of Kershaw too.“Medlen has a good changeup,” Kershaw said. “He’s been pitching awesome too, the last month or so, and obviously he’s had some success.”So have the Braves, who won 96 games, but some players were vocal with their frustration that the Dodgers and their big-name superstars were garnering more attention than the young, lesser-known Braves.“All the attention, I mean, we’re not running for prom king,” Medlen said.He looks young enough to run for prom king with a boyish face and skater-like way he wears his hat. But he’s got good stuff, and that’s what matters in October.“He has location with all his pitches and (good) movement on his fastball,” Atlanta catcher Brian McCann said. “For me, he has the best changeup in baseball. His curveball is very good. He can throw any pitch in any count. He’s a confident guy.”Confident enough to envision a day when he would play major league baseball.Just against the Dodgers, not with them.center_img “It’s cool to face them, but they’re just another team.”Medlen, who turns 28 on Monday, looks every part the California kid on the mound with that signature flat-brim baseball cap.He looked none of the part of a Game 1 playoff starter early in the season. Medlen was 1-6 in May — rivaling the Dodgers’ dismal start — but he credited simplifying things for his turnaround.He was 4-0 in September with a 1.00 ERA and was named the National League’s pitcher of the month.Pitching like that gives you the swagger necessary to take part in a pitching duel with Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw, the favorite to win his second Cy Young Award this season. Medlen was 15-12 with a 3.11 ERA in the regular season and won one fewer game than Kershaw.last_img read more

USAID’s MCSP/HRH Project Holds Learning Event Tomorrow

first_imgMidwifery students at Curran Hospital delivery Ward, being invited to attend tomorrow’s ceremony.An official Learning and Dissemination Event of the Human Resources for Health (HRH) Project, supported by United States Agency for International Development (USAID), will be held tomorrow, Thursday, September 13, at a resort in Monrovia, a release has said.According to the release, USAID, through its implementing partner, Maternal and Child Survival Program (MCSP/HRH Project), will conduct the arrangement in collaboration with authorities of the Ministry of Health (MoH), Pre-Service Institutions and Health Partners.The day-long celebration will be held under the theme, “Celebrating and Promoting Sustainable Pre-Service Education for Quality Human Resources for a Healthy Liberia: MCSP/HRH Empowering Midwives and Medical Laboratory Technicians.”Direct beneficiaries of the MCSP/HRH Project are Registered Midwifery (RM) and/or Medical Laboratory Technicians (MLT) Programs; Monrovia-based Tubman National Institute of Medical Arts (TNIMA), Winifred J. Harley College of Health Sciences; United Methodist University (UMU) and the Mother Pattern College of Health Sciences; Esther Bacon School of Nursing and Midwifery, in Zorzor, Lofa County, Phebe Paramedical Training Program  in Phebe, Bong County, and the Deanna K. Isaacson School of Midwifery, formerly the Midwifery Training Program for the Southeastern Region, located in Zwedru, Grand Gedeh County.Medical Laboratory students at Phebe will also attend the event.At tomorrow’s event, Minister of Health Dr. Wilhelmina Jallah and United States Ambassador to Liberia Christine Elder, Chairman of the Senate Standing Committee on Health Dr. Peter Coleman, as well as the MCSP and other health workforce partners are expected to participate.The event will, accordingly, feature cultural performances, sharing of experiences by beneficiaries and partners, while MCSP/HRH will also hold an exhibition to showcase selected high impact interventions focusing on MLTs, RMs, Gender, Monitoring Evaluation Research and Learning, Leadership, Management and Development Program and Faculty Development Program.Prior to Thursday’s event, according to the release, MCSP/HRH Project  contributed significantly to USAID/Liberia’s strategy toward strengthening and expanding the country’s skilled health workforce and preventing child and maternal mortality through improving health workforce readiness, reinforcing entry-level RMs and MLTs’ Pre-Service Education.The MCSP is the result of a global USAID cooperative agreement to introduce and support high-impact health interventions in 24 priority countries, with the ultimate goal of ending preventable child and maternal deaths.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Income gap in L.A. is growing

first_imgThe current educational model is not well-suited to the economy of tomorrow, and if it isn’t changed radically, “we could see the middle class hollowed out again,” said Jerry Nickelsburg, an economist with the Anderson Forecast at UCLA. To illustrate the income gap, economists use a scale in which zero is for a utopian society with wealth evenly distributed, and 100 is for a society in which a few mega-rich individuals hold all the dollars. In the United States, the index has slowly inched up to somewhere near 50 in the past 35 years, meaning wealth is distributed somewhat evenly between rich and poor. In L.A., however, it’s above 60 percent, meaning the wealthy control a disproportionate share of the money. According to the most recent Census Bureau data, the mean annual household income in Los Angeles stood at $66,364. On the wealthy side, nearly 60,000 households made more than $200,000. On the poor side, more than 140,000 made $10,000 or less. Things aren’t as bad as they were in the 1990s, when high- wage manufacturing jobs evaporated by the tens of thousands and the index soared well above the national average. Nickelsburg said the economy had evolved, so high- wage service jobs – paralegal, graphic design, communications and audio-visual – gave workers a better shot at working their way into the middle class. But the key difference then, he said, was that someone also could land a manufacturing job right out of high school with no special training. And if assembly-line workers got laid off at General Motors in Van Nuys, they could often take a short trip to Burbank and get hired at Lockheed with the same pay. Graphic designers, on the other hand, can’t just apply to be nurses if their firm closes. And without a more comprehensive employment-development and training strategy throughout the region, economist Jack Kyser said, the middle-class jobs of today can easily evaporate tomorrow. “When you have a two-tier economy with a rapidly shrinking middle class, you’ll have some social problems like crime and homelessness,” he said. “You need a balanced economy with a good job ladder so if people want to work hard, they can get ahead.” Jos Torres, 21, of Sylmar wants to work hard and get ahead. The first isn’t so difficult, he said, but the latter is a challenge. Torres makes $9.25 per hour, plus commissions, answering phones in customer service. He brings home around $285 per week. He rents a room from his mother, has credit card and cell phone bills and makes payments to a friend who lent him money to buy a 1991 Toyota Celica. To try to get ahead, Torres sought assistance from Communities In Schools, a North Hills agency that helped get him into vocational training. He plans to study to get into real estate and to save for a home. “It’s pretty difficult,” he said. “You need a little pile of money to get started, but it’s hard. Everything’s going up – rent, gas, everything. You’re not going to get that pile unless you starve yourself.” [email protected] (818) 713-3738160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! “I’m really blessed,” he said. “I still don’t have a Lamborghini, though. And I need one.” As Rodriguez marveled at the sleek, red Italian sports car, Martinez washed it. For the past seven years, that’s been his living, earning minimum wage plus tips. He has an apartment on Victory Boulevard in Valley Glen with his wife and two children. He makes $300 to $400 per week. “It’s hard,” Martinez said. “I don’t have a lot of money but, compared to Mexico, it’s good. There, $5 is a day’s work.” Rodriguez considers himself well-off; Martinez considers himself poor. And according to a report released today by the UCLA Anderson Forecast, Los Angeles has a growing number of people just like both of them – and not so many in the middle. While the local economy has adapted in recent years to accommodate more middle- class jobs, the report, titled “Richer and Poorer: Income Inequality in Los Angeles,” warns that the next generation of workers could find itself ill-prepared to labor its way from poor to rich. On one hand, Francisco Martinez and Paige Rodriguez aren’t so different. They both live in the San Fernando Valley. They’re both around 30. They both work with cars. But the similarity ends there. Rodriguez customizes high-end automobiles and sells them to celebrities. Last year, his 101 Automotive Group grossed $2.5 million. The Toluca Lake man drives a tricked- out Mercedes-Benz S550 he estimates is worth $150,000. last_img read more