Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon hosts first-ever virtual marathon

first_imgCourtesy of Jessie Snyder Jessie Snyder virtually participates in the Saint Mary’s annual Dance Marathon following the cancellation of the in-person event.The marathon, originally planned for April 4, was canceled as a result of Saint Mary’s move to remote learning through Easter break and eventually the rest of the semester. The decision to move the marathon virtually was made by the executive team who felt there had to be a marathon, no matter the conditions, senior club president Clare Carragher said. According to Carragher, the team utilized social media platforms like Instagram, FaceBook, TikTok and an updated website to provide sources of entertainment and information throughout the day.“We went live on Instagram at 10 a.m. with an opening ceremony — similar to the one held during a traditional marathon — explaining how people can participate throughout the day,” she said. Social media posts ran throughout the day on the same schedule as the traditional marathon. The posts consisted of Riley kid — patients at Riley Children’s hospital — miracle stories, video features of alumni nurses, pictures of participants’ 80’s decor to fit the theme of “Back to the ‘80s” and mini fundraising challenges. “The website was designed so people could come and go as they please and just provide some different forms of entertainment while we’re all quarantined in our houses across the country,” Carragher said.  The virtual marathon allowed for dancers, committee members and executives to participate in and experience a marathon from across the U.S. Carragher said the virtual marathon allowed for the message and mission of Dance Marathon to be spread to an even greater audience as it was all over social media all day. “A lot of good things came out of the day and a lot of things that, I hope, can continue moving forward,” Carragher said.  “Who knows where I will be a year or two down the road — so I would love for the option to check into the website and see the Riley family stories or watch the morale dance.”The committees worked in conjunction throughout the day to provide entertainment and keep the energy high, Carragher said. The morale dance, an eight minute line dance, is typically taught in segments throughout the day until it is performed by all participants at the end of the marathon. In lieu of this performance, the morale executives recorded themselves doing the dance all the way through. The morale committee girls then divided the dance into 11 mini tutorial videos that were posted throughout the day to social media. Participants were then invited to film themselves performing the morale dance and email the clips to the technology committee who then formed the final line dance with all the video submissions at the end of the night. Senior alumni relations executive Jessie Snyder was awarded this year’s Exec of the Year title by the president’s board for her success in leading the new committee. “Since it was a brand-new committee it gave me the opportunity to build into my own, I got to build it up from nothing,” Snyder said. The committee was formed in an effort to show thanks to alumni — many of whom have a passion and love for Riley that just doesn’t go away after graduation — and give them a way to still participate in Dance Marathon, she said. Participation in a virtual 12 hour event proved to be the biggest obstacle of planning the marathon, but both Carragher and Snyder commented on the pleasant surprise of seeing the community come together during an unprecedented time. “It wasn’t something we could have planned for but we were able to to turn a traditional marathon into something way bigger that was able to reach so many more people,” Snyder said. “If anything it brought us closer together and really proved the big impact that a small school like Saint Mary’s can have.”Tags: COVID-19, Riley Children’s Hospital, saint marys dance marathon, virtual The 15th annual Saint Mary’s Dance Marathon looked different from years past, as tri-campus community members gathered virtually Saturday rather than in Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex. The 12 hour marathon raises money for Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis.last_img read more

Fading La Niña delays onset of wet Caribbean season

first_imgThe Barbados-based Caribbean Institute for Meteorology and Hydrology (CIMH) says the onset of the wet season may be delayed by a few weeks in much of the Caribbean region.“By contrast, The Bahamas, Cuba, and French Guiana might be wetter than usual, with extreme wet spells being a potential concern for flooding and flash floods,” CIMH said, blaming a “quickly fading La Niña” which is associated with cooler-than-average sea surface temperatures, for the situation.In its latest Caribbean Climate Outlook Forum (CariCOF) outlooks for the period May to October this year, released Tuesday, the CIMH said heat discomfort, surface wetness and large water reservoir recharge rates related to wet spells may show a slower increase than usual.“However, dry spells and episodes of Saharan dust incursion may be frequent in Belize and the islands,” it added.CIMH said it continues to “see no drought concern developing throughout most of the region” with a drought watch however being issued for Antigua, north Bahamas, south east Belize, western Cuba, French Guiana, Guadeloupe, St. Maarten, St. Kitts, central Suriname, Tobago, Virgin Islands.It said copious rainfall during the wet season of 2017 and no large deficits having been built up since the start of the Caribbean dry season in most places, with south-eastern Haiti, north-western Guyana, south-western Jamaica, western-Puerto Rico being under long term drought, while north west Guyana is under short term drought.“Shorter term drought is evolving in coastal portions of Suriname, and might possibly develop in other portions of the Guianas. Long term drought is evolving in southeastern Haiti, and might possibly develop in Aruba, Bonaire and Curacao (ABC) islands, Antigua, western Cuba, northern and south-eastern Belize, coastal portions of French Guiana, St. Maarten, and portions of eastern Suriname.”The CIMH said that from May to July, night-time temperatures may be warmer than usual in ABC islands and the north-western Caribbean but cooler in the Lesser Antilles with the maximum day time temperature being cooler than usual from Trinidad southwards.“The hottest part of the year (August till early October) will likely be at least as warm as usual,” CIHM said, noting that “there will likely be less heatwave days than in most recent years across the region during this period.“Notwithstanding, there is a 15-20 percent chance for at least 14 heatwave days in Belize, eastern Cuba and Trinidad in the period May to July 2018,”it said, adding that “although there is the likelihood of a few heatwaves in many locations which may cause heat stress in human populations or livestock, the heat stress should be less acute than in most recent years.”last_img read more