Griffin Cook steps into expanded role with SU after growing up in program’s shadow

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Cook swung his arm over 6-foot-1 Sam Mueller when the Hobart defender tried to force a turnover one more time. Cook raced untouched toward the cage, faked the top left corner and finished bottom right.“If they leave him for a sec and he’s able to slip,” MacLachlan said, “he’s able to go to the crease.” Comments When Brendan Curry’s shot was blocked and bounced toward Colgate’s goalie, Griffin Cook paced backward and scanned the field. Sam Collins cradled the ball from inside his crease and dumped it off to a Raider midfielder, so Cook raced up three steps. As the Raiders attempted to avoid a clearing violation midway through the third quarter on Feb. 7, the strides of Cook’s 5-foot-7 frame mirrored those of his counterpart, who was five inches taller. The pair reached the 40-yard line and Cook swung his stick, whacking Marshall Terres across his body and popping the ball loose. Chase Scanlan ended the scramble sequence with a goal seconds later — one that Colgate head coach Matt Karweck called a staple of old-time Syracuse lacrosse. And it all originated because of Cook’s ride. “Although he’s small in stature and height, he will knock the snot out of you, man,” his uncle, Tom, said.Cook, a Jamesville-DeWitt product, grew up immersed in Syracuse lacrosse and eventually became the type of player the program is known for. Cook’s youth coach and former SU player Gavin MacLachlan said he rides like Mike and Casey Powell, and he creates like Gary and Paul Gait. Syracuse lacrosse connections existed throughout Cook’s life. They were present through his great-grandfather’s National Lacrosse Hall of Fame plaque hanging above his bedroom desk. And continued with preschool student teachers and high school and youth coaches that led him on his path — all with the common denominator of the Orange program.Each shaped Cook on his way to an eventual spot at Syracuse, where he had a one-year hiatus in the midfield before transitioning back to his “natural” spot at X this season. Through five games he’s used a blend of physicality and creativity to contribute five goals and lead the nation’s attack with seven caused turnovers, already making him third-place all-time for most caused turnovers in a season by an attack.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“You see so many guys run through those checks or it’s just a formality getting it across the midfield line, but somehow Griffin finds a way to take one more check and make it work,” Jeff Cook, his other uncle, said.Emily Steinberger | Design EditorCook’s size disadvantage was always present and forced him to account for it.  When Cook was 10, Jeff grabbed two dandelions — one white and one yellow — and pulled Cook aside, handing him the yellow one. He told Cook to hide it wherever he wanted, and he’d find it with his “wand.” Jeff turned his back for a dozen seconds and waited.“’Look behind your ear,” Jeff said, waving his wand around the perimeter of Cook’s ear. “Nothing there.”Cook smiled, thinking he had stumped his uncle. “Is it up your nose?” Jeff continued. “No. Open your mouth.” When Cook did, Jeff jammed the white dandelion inside and Cook stumbled backward, caught off guard.Jeff’s prank wasn’t pointless he said. In fact, it’d teach Cook a lesson that Jeff used throughout his lacrosse playing days at Delaware. Cook needed to fool people, mesmerizing them into thinking they knew what move was coming but thrusting a switch at them just when they become comfortable. Unpredictability is a vital concept for every Division-I offensive player but especially someone of Cook’s height.As a kid in his Syracuse neighborhood, Cook suited up in the backyard cages while Ryan Archer and other future Jamesville-DeWitt players peppered shots at him. He was too young to pigeon-hole himself into one position, but Cook still slowly eliminated options. Pole defense was likely out of the question. Short-stick defensive midfielder was just an experiment. But along with attack, Cook latched on to the cage. He couldn’t just sit back and wait for attackmen to shoot, though. They’d pick apart the top corners too easily. Cook would bait his opponents to throw them off-guard and even leave his crease to force a turnover and spark ensuing transition chances.“When we were younger, everyone had to take a turn and I guess just got stuck in there for a few years,” Cook said.Emily Steinberger | Design EditorBefore he earned the opportunity to roam the field for Syracuse, Cook associated with alumni of the program. Ryan’s father was Jamie Archer, Cook’s youth coaches were MacLachlan and Greg Burns — all former Syracuse lacrosse players. And every year, Cook and his family traveled to the Lake Placid Lacrosse Summit tournaments to watch his dad, David, and his uncles from the sidelines.Cook would run onto the field before games and show off split dodges. Any game of two-person catch had the possibility to become three. And slowly, Cook morphed a playing style by watching pros play and complementing his observations with YouTube film sessions.One of Cook’s first introductions to Syracuse lacrosse, though, came when his mother, Karen, earned her master’s degree at Syracuse, and he attended Bernice M. Wright Child Development Laboratory school — a preschool on SU’s South Campus. In Cook’s second year there, Sean Lindsay, then a senior with the SU men’s lacrosse team, was a student teacher, and the two bonded on field trips to Beak and Skiff Apple Orchard and reading sessions with “The Foot Book” by Dr. Seuss. Lindsay befriended the shy kid in the corner with glasses and long hair.After a Syracuse game that spring, Lindsay walked over to the Carrier Dome bleachers and asked David if Cook could come into the locker room. “Sure,” David responded. The two eased Cook over the rail and down to the ground, and he disappeared into the tunnel. Later on, Cook reemerged with autographed programs and memorabilia.Griffin Cook’s student teacher at Bernice M. Wright Child Development Laboratory School was Sean Lindsay, then a senior with the SU men’s lacrosse team. Courtesy of Karen Cook“Did I think Griffin was going to grow up and be this amazing player he is to this day from taking him into the locker room? No,” Lindsay said. “But if that planted some type of seed for the passion of the sport of lacrosse, that’s really what it’s all about.”Watching the freedom of Syracuse’s offense inspired Cook to experiment with his own playing style. He used Jeff and Tom as defenders. Other times, he just wrestled for face-offs with them — an occasional task asked of Cook, especially in club games. One year of football crafted the toughness and physicality Cook carried over onto the lacrosse field, Jeff said.Nearly 10 years later, that’s still the foundation for the style of play that allowed Cook to earn the third attack spot out of preseason scrimmages. On Feb. 28, Cook received a pass from Stephen Rehfuss at X and watched as one Hobart defender became two after a slide. He dodged and tried to split the pair, but instead circled back and reset — knocking away a Statesmen stick with his right arm.center_img Published on March 12, 2020 at 12:49 am Contact Andrew: [email protected] | @CraneAndrewlast_img read more

Amid swirl of controversy, Lakers introduce Frank Vogel as head coach

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersIf nothing else, Vogel rolled in a surreal morning in which the excitement of the Lakers introducing the coach they hope can break a six-year playoff drought was dampened by dirty laundry airing from the previous season. The former Indiana Pacers and Orlando Magic coach, who has a 304-291 overall record on the sideline, did his best to steer the conversation from the difficult past to what he sees as a team with “tremendous promise.”Inheriting a roster with LeBron James, a number of recent first-round picks, and cap space for an additional star salary and the No. 4 pick in the next draft, Vogel said he was brimming with optimism. But he emphasized that while his success will ultimately be judged by the ability to get back to the postseason – which is an urgent issue for a franchise which has never been shut out from the playoffs for this long – his approach will be characterized by staying present and creating a strong work ethic within the Lakers organization.“We are going to be focused on the work: the day-to-day, stay in the moment,” he said. “How do we get better at practice? How do we win the next game? Focus on the task at hand, and then those accolades, those achievements, those results, they will come.”Among the many awkward questions for the Lakers at Monday’s press conference, General Manager Rob Pelinka was asked to account for how the team came to Vogel after a month-long search for Luke Walton’s replacement that had other favorites before Vogel. Notably, the Lakers were close to terms with Tyronn Lue, who had previously coached James to the 2016 championship with the Cleveland Cavaliers, when negotiations broke down over the length of his contract offer (reportedly just three years) as well as the Lakers desiring to place former Nets and Bucks coach Jason Kidd on his staff.Neither of those appeared to be problems for Vogel, who acknowledged Kidd’s role as one of his assistants and is reportedly on a three-year deal. But Pelinka said Vogel ended up standing out from the initial list of names for his detailed preparation, his outlined vision for the Lakers’ style of play, and his playoff success of reaching back-to-back Eastern Conference finals with the Pacers. Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers PreviousLos Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers player LeBron James watches as his new head coach Frank Vogel, foreground, conducts an interview after Vogel was introduced as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers player LeBron James watches from the back of the gym as Frank Vogel is introduced as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka, left, introduces Frank Vogel as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers player LeBron James wipes his brow as he watches from the back of the gym after Frank Vogel was introduced as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka, left, watches Frank Vogel talks about his role as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka, left, introduces Frank Vogel as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)New Los Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel, left, and general manager Rob Pelinka arrives for a press conference at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers senior basketball advisor Kurt Rambis arrives for the press conference announcing Frank Vogel as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 10Los Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)ExpandEL SEGUNDO — During the hiring process, the Lakers told Frank Vogel something that was immediately reinforced in his first week at work: This ain’t Indiana.That manifested in topsy-turvy fashion on Monday morning, as Vogel spent most of his 26-minute introductory press conference as head coach of the Lakers silently listening as his general manager handled accusations of backstabbing from the outgoing team president.It didn’t throw the 45-year-old New Jersey native off his message – that he’s here to instill a positive, forward-thinking culture to a franchise in need of one – but even Vogel acknowledged it was a little outside his normal operating procedure.“It’s a little different,” Vogel said. “Definitely different than I expected and different than I’ve ever been a part of. But I understand the line of questioning, in light of the events of this morning, so you just roll with the punches.” “Throughout the process, he just continued to emerge as someone that had those qualities I talked about at the beginning of this and we celebrate that,” he said. “He is the coach. He is the right guy for this job.”Vogel shares an agent with Lue and was initially excited to be an assistant on Lue’s staff in Los Angeles. But once Lue bowed out, the Lakers “moved quickly” to interview him for the top coaching job and make him an offer.“It’s very emotional and exciting,” he said from the dais. “I’m not gonna lie, it’s pretty cool to be up here right now.”Vogel’s belief that the future holds brighter things applies to his own coaching style, which he said has evolved since his days in Indiana. A disciple of Rick Pitino, Vogel built Indiana teams which won with defensive grit and just enough on the offensive end. But as the NBA has changed, so has he, he said, and in Orlando, he tried to grow a more 3-point-oriented style that he continued to study into his “sabbatical year” since he was fired from the Magic in 2018.Under his leadership, Vogel said the Lakers will aim to create an “outside-in” approach to offense which will rely on the threat of 3-point shooting to set up attacking the rim. It puts an impetus on the front office to add shooting in free agency to a team that finished 29th in 3-point percentage (33.3). On defense, Vogel will shoot for an inverse approach: a scheme predicated on protecting the rim and the paint first.“I’m really, really excited about the chance to instill my beliefs of how it’s going to look,” Vogel said.Kidd’s hire has incited speculation since it was first reported: As a former assistant coach who has a pre-existing relationship with James who has had sometimes turbulent relationships with coaches and management, outsiders have wondered if Kidd would function as an in-house replacement for Vogel if his tenure gets off to a rough start.Vogel literally laughed at the suggestion.“You can’t worry about looking over your shoulder,” he said. “You gotta worry about getting good damn coaches. That’s how I feel about this hire.”Vogel said he had extensive conversations with Kidd, whose hire has not been officially announced by the organization, and that he believed Kidd would be “an incredible asset” in what he hopes will be a collaborative coaching staff.Asked about Kidd’s history of domestic violence (he pled guilty to spousal abuse in 2000 as a player), Vogel said it did initially concern him, but he and Kidd had spoken about it: “This was something that was in the past and he’s sort of spoken upon it and moved on from it. I believe he’s in a very different place than back then.”Related Articles How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years center_img Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions The introduction was attended by most of the Lakers’ front office staff and several players, most notably James who stood in the wings of the team’s practice facility and did not speak publicly to reporters. Vogel’s Pacers teams twice clashed in the conference finals with James’ Miami Heat teams, once pushing them to seven games before the Heat prevailed. Vogel said his conversations with James had been “very positive,” and he sounded hopeful that the culture he built in Indiana would help inform their future relationship and buy in his investment.He didn’t see a clash of ideology trying to coach a young group along with a veteran of James’ stature: “Every player I’ve ever been around that’s, quite frankly, worth a damn wants to be challenged and wants to be pushed and wants to be coached hard and wants to be held accountable.”Vogel is the latest in an unsteady chain of coaches: He’s the fifth coach the Lakers have hired since Phil Jackson left in 2011. None have lasted longer than Walton, who coached for three years without bringing the Lakers back to the postseason, finishing his final campaign with a 37-45 record marred by injuries.Even on a day when the baggage of the last era was still front and center, Vogel remained undaunted – and promised that true change is forthcoming.“There’s a positive vibe happening with our team right now,” he said. “There really is. OK? And it’s just one of those things where you’re going to have to wait and see, but you’re going to be happy with the product that we put on the floor this year and where we’re going as an organization. You really are.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Walda ‘Granda’ Eaton, 70, Wellington: January 22, 1943 – May 7, 2013

first_imgWanda EatonWanda “Granda” Eaton, of Wellington, died Tuesday, May 7, 2013 at in Wellington at the age of 70.Wanda was born the daughter of Thelma Maye (White) and Robert Eaton on  January 22, 1943 in Wichita.Survivors include daughter, Tonya Acosta of Wellington, sister, Linda Smith and her husband Carl of Wellington, grandson, Tomas Ruben Acosta and his companion Elaine Rausch of Haysville, great- grandchildren, Isahia Acosta and Sophia Marie Acosta both of Haysville, numerous nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews and numerous loved ones.She was preceded in death by her parents, sister Lydia Bollock, children Jimmy Dale Rodgers and Lottie Mae Abernathy.Wanda was a loving mother, friend and giver. She was a professional dog groomer and was notable women in Texas for dog grooming. She made one of a kind handcrafted wind chimes.Memorial services for Wanda will take place at 2:00 pm. Tuesday May, 14, 2013 in the Day Funeral Home chapel, 1030 Mission Rd. Wellington.Memorials have been established in her loving memory with Wellington Humane Society, Box 494, Wellington 67152. Contributions can be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info.Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more

Nigeria’s bright, trippy uniforms a hit among World Cup unis

first_imgSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES In fight vs corruption, Duterte now points to Ayala, MVP companies as ‘big fish’ MOST READ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award “The ones you remember are the ones that are crazy, but some leagues are risk averse,” said Doonan, author of the new book “Soccer Style: The Magic and Madness.”“The World Cup is a carnival. It’s not supposed to be a beacon of restraint and good taste,” he said.Doonan’s favorites on the flamboyant front: Croatia’s red-and-white checkerboard, reminiscent of the country’s flag and medieval coat of arms — and, some say, — the Big Boy burger chain (Nike); Colombia’s red-and-blue lightning bolts coming out of the armpits against a bright yellow background (Adidas); and Belgium’s horizontal dash of red-and-yellow Argyle, like the socks (also Adidas).Doonan is also a fan of vertical stripes (hello, Argentina in blue and white, just like your flag and your kits from your 1978 World Cup win).There are some jerseys he’s not hugely fond of as a matter of personal preference.“I’m very obsessed with symmetry, in life and in my work, so the Spain shirt, even though I’m a big fan of the Spanish team, the asymmetry of those shirts and that sort of folkloric zigzag only on one side, completely freaks me out,” Doonan said of the dash of yellow, blue and red against, well, red.And then there’s Nigeria, the social media and retail king heading into the World Cup.“They’re fabulous,” Doonan said.Bennett agreed: “You could wear it to a rave in Manchester in the 1990s and fit right in. It’s a great way to live a life.”As for the upside down Vs in the Nigeria design, Hoppins said it’s a nod to eagles — as in the team’s Super Eagles nickname. Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Or, in the case of Australia, gold with a riot of jagged lines on shoulders and sleeves of home jerseys. The algae green lines celebrate waves and the country’s proximity to various oceans and seas, said Nike football apparel senior design director Pete Hoppins. The away kit is all green with a diagonal slash of yellow and lighter green touches on the front, in tribute to Australia’s 2006 jerseys .Soccer fans have been buzzing for weeks about Nigeria’s shirts, to the delight of supplier Nike but not so much among folks back home who consider the $85 price tag out of reach . The away shirts are a screeching bright green, white and black with trippy jagged edging on a chevron pattern that may just be the World Cup’s shining Rorschach moment, along with an ode to the country’s style and pop culture energy.The we-have-arrived look is a modern reinvention of Nigeria’s 1994 kits, the first time the country qualified for the World Cup. The new shirts sold out in minutes on the first day of sales in some spots, including Nike’s flagship store in London and online, Hoppins said, after stakeholders decided early on to go bold and market the strips in a collection that also includes hats, T-shirts and jackets.“We’ve never seen anything like this before in terms of excitement, in terms of people queuing around the block,” Hoppins said, referring to the crowd that showed up June 1. “It’s something that Nike has never really done before, which is going all out and having fun with it. We want Nigeria to be everyone’s second team.”To Simon Doonan, soccer nut and creative ambassador at large for Barneys New York, when it comes to out-there World Cup shirts, you’re either in or you’re out.ADVERTISEMENT Winfrey details her decision to withdraw from Simmons film Those countries are among several of the more festive standouts in jerseys for the global soccer showcase, with loads of sentimental touches in the designs of the 32 teams.With millions in exposure and retail sales at stake, the World Cup kits of 2018 can be categorized, generally speaking, like this: Team Plain, Team Retro and Team Cool Kid on the Pitch.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folkSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crown“We didn’t used to care so much,” said Roger Bennett, who is half the wacky British duo of the “Men in Blazers” soccer show on NBC Sports.“What’s changed is the fusion of the World Cup and the Premier League and the Champions League and television as a global platform, and advertising, which has essentially transformed them from being just functional garments, nothing to see here, just polyester, everybody move along, to the single-most lucrative billboard in the world,” he said. “They may as well be spun from gold in terms of the impact that they have on the sports manufacturing brands that propel them.” China population now over 1.4 billion as birthrate falls In this June 5, 2018 photo people walk by Nigerian and Brazil national soccer team jerseys which are on display at a shop in London. With just days to go before the FIFA World Cup, some winners and losers have emerged among the often wild and wacky team jerseys. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)NEW YORK — Spain, your asymmetry is showing. Nigeria, you’re so bright I need shades! Croatia, Russia’s fresh out of Big Boy restaurants.No worries, though, your party duds will be just the ticket once the World Cup gets underway June 14.ADVERTISEMENT Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours Other nationals also have ’90s throwback designs. Germany’s black-and-white shirts are an update of the jerseys won by Der Mannschaft’s 1990 champions.“That’s a nice bit of nostalgia,” Bennett said.Hoppins considers the ’90s a heyday in jersey style.In the clash of sports company titans behind the parade of shirts, Adidas “has the wind behind them,” as Bennett said, with 12 countries that include some powerhouse players, followed by Nike with 10, Puma with three and New Balance with two. Brands with one include Errea (Iceland), Hummel (Denmark), Uhlsport (Tunisia), Romai (Senega) and Umbro (Peru), with its iconic red sash against white.The U.S. didn’t qualify, so forget another patriotic jersey iteration on display. Remember 1994, the year Adidas went with a washed-out denim blue-and-star design that some dubbed the worst World Cup shirts in history?While acknowledging the deep pride and symbolism behind Croatia’s ever-present checkerboard, Bennett isn’t a fan: “I find it fairly terrifying. It’s a tablecloth.”Among the uniforms on Bennett’s not-so-much list: Iceland.“For whatever reason they’ve decided to clad their footballers in shirts so tight they’re like sausage casings,” Bennett said. “It’s all nipples.”He was all praise for the Japan jersey, a rich blue that references the ancient Japanese technique of sashiko hand stitching in a pattern of rows of tracks down the front.“It’s utterly captivating and everything that’s beautiful about a national football jersey,” he said. “That’s what we should aspire to.” North American trio beats Morocco to host 2026 World Cup Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Jury of 7 men, 5 women selected for Weinstein rape trial View comments Dave Chappelle donates P1 million to Taal relief operations DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displacedlast_img read more