Alexander: Celebrating, and hanging on to, Dodgers’ Spanish voice Jaime Jarrin

first_img Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies “The first thing Mr. Walter O’Malley did was to hire a helicopter and fly over Los Angeles and see the demographics of Southern California, and he said, ‘Jaime, I am going to give them something in their own language so they can really enjoy the game.’ And I have been fortunate to be the link, to be the spokesperson for the Dodgers and to reach the Hispanic community.”His philosophy is that his listeners work a long, hard day and deserve the enjoyment of a ballgame at its end. Beyond that, he has provided a connection, a way for immigrants to assimilate and an opportunity for a multi-faceted community, with people from many different Central and South American backgrounds, to connect through baseball.He has another role, too, a valuable one for us English-speakers who struggle with Español.“I understand in the Spanish classes at the universities and colleges here, the teachers used to tell them to listen to the Dodgers broadcast in Spanish,” Jarrín said. “Probably they still do.”If they respond to the flight of a home run with “Se va, se va, se va” … yes, that would be a [email protected]@Jim_Alexander on TwitterDodger broadcaster Jaime Jarrin, back, works a game with Fernando Valenzuela. (AP Photo/Jerome T. Nakagawa) Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire center_img “When I started with the Dodgers in 1959 at the Coliseum, the Latinos coming to the ballgames were about eight percent,” he said. “Now, at Dodger Stadium, they tell me it’s around 46 percent Latinos. And if you go during a game and take a walk around the ballpark inside, you will hear as much Spanish as English.”Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.And, as he noted, those fans no longer just sit in the pavilions or the general admission seats at the top of the park, but throughout the stadium.There have been a number of factors, of course, in the uptick in Latino support. The phenomenon that was Fernando Valenzuela made a difference (and Jarrín, as the pitcher’s interpreter to English-speaking audiences, had a part in that, too). A heritage of Spanish-speaking Dodger stars has helped, a list from Manny Mota to Kiké Hernández that includes such luminaries as Pedro Guerrero, Ramón Martínez, Adrián Beltré, Raúl Mondesí, César Izturis, Rafael Furcal and Adrián González.But Jarrín has been the constant in forging that link between the Dodgers and Southern California’s Spanish-speaking community. Thursday’s announcement of a two-year contract extension, meaning that he will continue to do games through at least 2020, and Friday’s Ring of Honor ceremony before the series opener against the Padres further reinforce his importance to the franchise.Is he the Spanish-speaking Vin Scully? Or was Scully the English-speaking Jaime Jarrín? Doesn’t matter. Both are Hall of Famers, dear friends, and indelibly linked with the Dodgers as the only baseball broadcasters to spend six decades with one team.And now Jarrín, at age 82 and blessed with good health, an elegant style and indefatigable enthusiasm, is working a Scully schedule. He skipped three road trips this year, the first time in all these years he’s taken more than a two-week break at midseason, and he will likely do so in future seasons as well.“It’s not that I don’t like traveling,” he said. “I enjoy traveling. I enjoy seeing my friends on the road, seeing my colleagues, talking to them, trying to grasp as much as possible from my colleagues. But leaving my family for such a long time alone, it’s tough. It is getting tougher. My wife, Blanca, she has been a champion. She is the one who really deserves all the accolades.”The backstory by now is familiar. Jarrín arrived in Southern California in 1955, a journey with Blanca that started by boat from Ecuador to Tampa, followed by a cross-country Greyhound trip to L.A.  He knew little about baseball when he arrived but soon became intrigued by the Pacific Coast League, the best L.A. had at the time.When Walter O’Malley brought the Dodgers to town in 1958, Jarrín was the news and sports director of radio station KWKW. The station reached an agreement to do the games in Spanish, Jarrín was given a year to prepare, and in 1959 he started a job that has captivated him all these years.He ticked off three reasons for his longevity:• He still sincerely loves the game. “I can do two games every day, seven days a week,” he said. “I love what I do. I take advantage of the fact I have the best seat in the stadium.”• His wife has been amazingly supportive. And one of his sons, Jorge, is now his partner in the booth.Jorge handles the statistical analysis, while Jaime provides the stories and the historical perspective. If that sounds like Scully … well, for the first eight years KWKW aired the games, before the Spanish broadcasters were allowed to travel, Jarrin would do recreations off of the English broadcasts of Scully and Jerry Doggett. He readily admits he picked up some good habits along the way.• The third reason? “I landed with the Dodgers, an organization that really, really respects my community,” he said.Related Articles LOS ANGELES — There are two ways to measure the impact of Jaime Jarrín, the Spanish language Voice of the Dodgers, on the community that has followed his broadcasts for the last six decades.One is word of mouth.“The best compliment that I have gotten,” he said this week, “is that when I am walking on the streets, when I go into a restaurant, when I am going shopping, people approach me and they tell me, ‘Mr. Jarrín, my grandfather used to hear you every single day. My mother followed the Dodgers thanks to you.’ Then I (say), ‘Well, we grew up together then.’ That hits me very deeply and I am so thankful I had the opportunity to do that.”The other measure? Look at the composition of the crowds in the ballpark. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Walda ‘Granda’ Eaton, 70, Wellington: January 22, 1943 – May 7, 2013

first_imgWanda EatonWanda “Granda” Eaton, of Wellington, died Tuesday, May 7, 2013 at in Wellington at the age of 70.Wanda was born the daughter of Thelma Maye (White) and Robert Eaton on  January 22, 1943 in Wichita.Survivors include daughter, Tonya Acosta of Wellington, sister, Linda Smith and her husband Carl of Wellington, grandson, Tomas Ruben Acosta and his companion Elaine Rausch of Haysville, great- grandchildren, Isahia Acosta and Sophia Marie Acosta both of Haysville, numerous nieces, nephews, great nieces and nephews and numerous loved ones.She was preceded in death by her parents, sister Lydia Bollock, children Jimmy Dale Rodgers and Lottie Mae Abernathy.Wanda was a loving mother, friend and giver. She was a professional dog groomer and was notable women in Texas for dog grooming. She made one of a kind handcrafted wind chimes.Memorial services for Wanda will take place at 2:00 pm. Tuesday May, 14, 2013 in the Day Funeral Home chapel, 1030 Mission Rd. Wellington.Memorials have been established in her loving memory with Wellington Humane Society, Box 494, Wellington 67152. Contributions can be mailed or left with the funeral home.To share a memory or leave condolences, please visit www.dayfuneralhome.info.Arrangements are by Day Funeral Home & Crematory, Wellington.last_img read more

No longer will we be ‘one people’ or ‘one nation’

first_imgDear Editor,Recent events in our nation have brought Jean Jacques Rousseau’s famous quote “When the people shall have nothing more to eat, they will eat the rich” sharply to mind, for we are entering that period in our history where it is happening before our eyes. The Guyana of my youth was characterised by friendships that crossed social, ethnic and economic barriers; parents did not interfere with these relationships and being ‘rich’ or ‘poor’ was never an issue, integrity of character was the only benchmark applied. I fear that this is already under threat and two recent events show that the divide has gotten wider and is almost beyond repair.The murder of young Patrick Fraser, who was simply hanging out with friends, with no thought that anyone viewed him as any different and the shooting of Kristian Jeffery, who thought it would be acceptable to walk in the company of friends through Agricola after the Buju Banton concert are harbingers of things to come. Parents of the ‘haves’ will now be securing the gates; building the high fences, both physical and mental, to secure their offspring and friendships outside of the socio-economic circle will not be encouraged and eventually forbidden. The rich will retreat into security compounds and gated communities (already a feature) and the poor will be further isolated in ever growing pockets of despair.Inequality will always exist in non-utopian societies, but democracy, the equal power of one vote, is a check to the politicians and parties that form Governments, or so it should be. Merton’s Strain Theory states that society puts pressure on individuals to achieve socially accepted goals though they lack the means. The responsibility lies with Government to bridge this gap, unfortunately, our nation is being administered by a cabal of the most uncaring. In four short years, they have exacerbated the gap between the rich and poor to the brink of the unthinkable; they would rather destroy democracy and the balance it brings than give up the power and perks of office. The strain is being evidenced by the sharp rise in violent crime. It cannot be solved by the sponsoring of entertainment and sharing of tickets, that story of “bread and circus” has played out its usefulness aeons ago.Editor, change is upon us, the expatriate community is growing daily, their salaries far exceed even the dreams of our large middle class. They will begin by renting homes but as the history of oil development shows, they will inevitably build their secure compounds, travel in heavily armoured convoys, employ armed services to escort them and live separate from the ‘locals’. The strain will be felt by those outside those compound walls, our children will not form these bonds of friendship that enrich lives and last lifetimes; the rich will live on the hills and the poor in the valleys of despair. No longer will we be “one people” or “one nation”. The poor have started eating and Granger has put us on the menu. The only hope for all Guyanese lies in that equality promised at the ballot box on Election Day.Respectfully,Robin Singhlast_img read more