MBU to face sanctions

first_imgMontego Bay United FC (MBU) will face sanctions for their absence from yesterday’s Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) weekly press conference at Red Stripe Hospitality Lounge, Spanish Town Road. The finalists, Portmore United FC and MBU, were invited, but only Portmore’s representatives turned up. Chairman of MBU Orville Powell is holding firm that his club will not contest Sunday’s final if the Professional Football Association of Jamaica (PFAJ) continues to insist that the game will kick-off at 4 p.m. “We continue to protest. We are protesting. They (the PFAJ) continue to disrespect people. We are also stakeholders as clubs. I will not take the field on Sunday at 4 p.m. If they don’t compromise, we won’t compromise,” Powell told The Gleaner when contacted yesterday morning. General manager of the Premier League Clubs’ Association (PLCA) Andrew Price said yesterday that MBU would be sanctioned for not attending the weekly press conference. “This is a part of the rules and regulations of the body … so if a club is not here, they will be sanctioned,” Price said during the press conference. The PFAJ is responsible for taking decisions on match dates and kick-off times. The RSPL final will be aired live on TVJ and SportsMax. It will also be on CNTV in America and Canada.last_img read more

Platypus Genome Surprises Evolutionists

first_imgThanks to more efficient sequencing techniques, genomes of more and more animals are coming to light.  The latest is from one of the most unusual animals in nature: the duck-billed platypus of Australia.  The long and short of it: if evolutionists were confused about the phenotype (outward appearance) of this creature, they are just as confused by the genotype (the DNA).    Nature,1 which published the genome as its cover story, also printed a news summary with illustrations on its Nature News site.  Other science sites quickly printed articles about it but varied on their spin: New Scientist (“platypus genome is as weird as it looks”); Science Daily (“Platypus Genome Explains Animal’s Peculiar Features; Holds Clues To Evolution Of Mammals”); Live Science (“World’s Strangest Creature?  Part Mammal, Part Reptile”); and National Geographic (“Platypus Genome Reveals Secrets of Mammal Evolution”).  Science Daily began its coverage, “The duck-billed platypus: part bird, part reptile, part mammal – and the genome to prove it.”    Among the oddities in the genes: the platypus has 52 chromosomes, including 10 sex chromosomes (but its X and Y are not sex chromosomes).  The animal has genes for lactation and egg-laying.  Scientists cannot seem to figure out whether it is closer to reptiles or to mammals.  Its webbed feet, duck bill, venomous spurs, electric sensory organ, fur, egg-laying and beaver tail make it an incongruous mosaic of features.  The first scientists to examine one thought it was a hoax, as if some practical-joking taxidermist sewed a duck bill on a beaver.    The Nature article, while claiming that this new genome supports evolution, stated clearly that the confusion of traits in the platypus extends right down to the genetic level:Since its initial description, the platypus has stood out as a species with a blend of reptilian and mammalian features, which is a characteristic that penetrates to the level of the genome sequence.  The density and distribution of repetitive sequence, for example, reflects this fact.  The high frequency of interspersed repeats in the platypus genome, although typical for mammalian genomes, is in contrast with the observed mean microsatellite coverage, which appears more reptilian.  Additionally, the correlation of parent-of-origin-specific expression patterns in regions of reduced interspersed repeats in the platypus suggests that the evolution of imprinting in therians is linked to the accumulation of repetitive elements.They only made suggestions about platypus evolution.  None of the explanation sounds clear and unambiguous.  Calling certain characters “reptilian” in an animal with fur that lactates seems to confuse rather than elucidate the relationship.  They called the male platypus’s ability to produce venom reptilian, for instance.  But snakes strike with their fangs, and the male platypus strikes with its heel.  How many mutations did it take to move the venom apparatus from one end of the ancestor to the other end of the descendent?  Why did it happen?  Where are the missing links?  In fact, they had to admit that there is no relationship: “Convergent evolution has thus clearly occurred during the independent evolution of reptilian and monotreme venom,” they said.  This only doubles the mystery of the origin of venom.  Furthermore, the platypus venom was found to be a cocktail with at least 19 complex compounds, each one requiring specific genes for its manufacture.  They claimed some of these genes had arisen by duplication of genes with other functions.  There are difficulties with this class of explanation, however (see CMI).    A fossil monotreme found last year, said to be 112 million years old, stunned evolutionists ( (11/27/2007, 01/21/2008, bullet 2).  Timothy Rowe commented, “It’s really, really old for a monotreme.”  No clear fossil sequence connects the earliest monotreme with the modern platypus or echidna.    Meanwhile, the platypus seems unconcerned with all this genealogical hubbub.  It swims along with its happy duckbilled grin, its sleek fur and sensory organs perfectly adapted for its unique habitat. 1.  Genome consortium, “Genome analysis of the platypus reveals unique signatures of evolution,” Nature 453, 175-183 (8 May 2008) | doi:10.1038/nature06936.It’s kind of funny to see the Darwinists squirm.  Do they really need to conjure up a mythical tree to hang this wonderful animal on?  Maybe that’s a very misguided quest for a scientist.  Why not just study the living animal and understand how it is put together, so we can learn some practical things that might improve our lives?  Did Galileo have to study the ancestry of the rocks he dropped from the tower?  Did Faraday have to ponder the ancestry of magnetism to build a motor and generator?  Did Carver have to ponder the phylogeny of the peanut to make 300 products with it?  What is this obsession with genealogies?  Are Darwinists in the worldview business perhaps?    The Apostle Paul cautioned against “foolish disputes, genealogies, contentions, and strivings about the law; for they are unprofitable and useless” (Titus 3:9).  This does not say that scientific research into genomes is useless.  Deciphering genomes helps us understand how organisms function in the present.  Comparisons between animals also illuminates the way genomes produce adult animals that are adapted to various ecological niches.  The useless genealogies begin with questions about who begat whom.  Notice that we only observe live platypi (pardon the Greek).  We do not see them 112 million years ago.  (Fossils exist in the present, not in the past.)  Animals are what they are.  They have what they have.  They do what they do.  They do it well.  That’s about all that can be investigated with any confidence using the limited methods of science.  For information about unobservable prehistories, one needs a different source of information.Exercise:  Defend or refute the proposition, “God created the platypus to confound evolutionary theories.”  Provide evidence to support your position.(Visited 16 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Federer on verge of Wimbledon immortality

first_imgVictory over Croatian giant Marin Cilic will also give him a 19th career Grand Slam title and second in three majors this year after sweeping to a fifth Australian Open in January following a six-month absence.“I was hoping to be in good shape when the grass court season came around,” said Federer who, for good measure, also pocketed back-to-back Masters at Indian Wells and Miami as well as a ninth Halle grass court crown.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“The first three, four months were just like a dream really. So this is something I was working towards, you know, Wimbledon, to be in good shape. I’m happy it’s paying off here now.”Federer admits his form in 2017 has surprised even himself after he shut down his 2016 season to rest a knee injury in the aftermath of his brutal five-set semi-final loss at Wimbledon to Milos Raonic. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ While ‘Big Four’ rivals Murray, Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal failed to even make the semi-finals, Federer has been reborn.He came into Wimbledon having radically pruned his playing schedule, skipping the entire clay court season.Wimbledon is just his seventh event of the year; 28-year-old Cilic is in his 15th.Federer, reveling in the spotlight of having played all his matches on Centre Court, has hardly been troubled on his way to the final.He has lost serve just four times and spent four and a half hours less on court than Cilic.Federer also boasts a 6-1 career record over Cilic, the 2014 US Open champion who has made his first Wimbledon final at the 11th attempt.However, Cilic’s game is made for grass and 12 months ago he led Federer by two sets to love and held three match points in an epic quarter-final which the Swiss superstar eventually claimed. ‘Roger’s home court’When Cilic won his only Slam in New York three years ago, he demolished Federer in straight sets in the semi-finals.“I don’t want to say it’s more relaxed going into it because I have a good head-to-head record against Marin, even though the matches were extremely close,” said Federer.“But it’s not like we’ve played against each other 30 times. You feel like you have to reinvent the wheel.  Harden intent on winning title in wake of new deal Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet View comments National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress LATEST STORIES MOST READ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’center_img This combination of pictures created on January 29, 2017 shows Switzerland’s tennis player Roger Federer holding up his 18 Grand Slam titles. 1st row, from left : Australian Open 2017, Wimbledon 2012, Australian Open 2010, Wimbledon 2009, Roland Garros 2009, US Open 2008. 2nd row, from left : US Open 2007, Wimbledon 2007, Australian Open 2007, US Open 2006, Wimbledon 2006, Australian Open 2006. 3rd row, from left : US Open 2005, Wimbledon 2005, US Open 2004, Wimbledon 2004, Australian Open 2004, Wimbledon 2003. / AFP PHOTO / STFFive years after his last Wimbledon triumph, Roger Federer can capture a record eighth All England Club title Sunday and become the tournament’s oldest men’s champion of the modern era.With his 36th birthday fast approaching, the evergreen Swiss will comfortably succeed Arthur Ashe, who was almost 32 when he won in 1975, as Wimbledon’s most senior champion.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “It’s more straightforward, in my opinion. I think that’s nice in some ways. It’s a nice change, but it doesn’t make things easier.”Cilic is only the second Croatian man to reach the Wimbledon final after Goran Ivanisevic, his former coach, who swept to a memorable title victory in 2001.A win on Sunday would also make him the first Wimbledon champion outside of Federer, Murray, Djokovic and Nadal since Lleyton Hewitt triumphed in 2002.However, he has only won one of his last 12 matches against a top five player at the Slams, even if that was over Federer in New York three years ago.Cilic has fired 130 aces at Wimbledon this year and dropped just 10 service games.“This is Roger’s home court, the place where he feels the best and knows that he can play the best game,” said Cilic.“Obviously I’m going to look back, 12 months ago I was one point away from winning a match against him here. But it’s still a big mountain to climb.”Federer’s defeated semi-final opponent Tomas Berdych sees only one winner on Sunday.“I don’t see anything that would indicate Roger is getting older. He’s just proving his greatness in our sport,” said the Czech. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games He has 30 wins and just two losses this year and he has reached his 11th Wimbledon final without dropping a set.‘Unbelievably excited’Sunday’s match will be his 102nd at the tournament and his 29th final at the majors.“It makes me really happy, making history here at Wimbledon. It’s a big deal. I love this tournament,” said Federer, who has been tied with Pete Sampras on seven Wimbledon titles since beating Andy Murray in the 2012 final.“All my dreams came true here as a player. To have another chance to go for number eight now, be kind of so close now at this stage, is a great feeling. “Yeah, unbelievably excited. I hope I can play one more good match. 11 finals here, all these records, it’s great. I’m so close now.”ADVERTISEMENT El Nido residents told to vacate beach homeslast_img read more