Annual Homelessness Awareness Week starts Monday

first_imgStudents attend a Homelessness Awareness Week event last year. The annual week features events aimed at educating students while finding solutions to homelessness. (Photo courtesy of Faizus Amin)Undergraduate Student Government, Student Service Assembly and Share a Meal, among other organizations, are co-hosting the University’s annual Homelessness Awareness Week, which runs Nov. 12-15, to educate students on the prevalence of homelessness both on and off campus.“We’re trying to balance awareness to action,” said Alec Vandenberg, director of external affairs for USG and president of Share a Meal. “Not only to get people educated, but also [to] give them concrete tools to make a difference now and in the future.”The event starts Monday with a screening of “Invisible,” a documentary which depicts the struggles of low-income students, followed by a discussion with the film’s director, Justice Butler. Homelessness Awareness Week is focusing its efforts on campus hunger and homelessness, according to Vandenberg.“When we take into account factors such as the rising cost of college and tuition coupled with consistently skyrocketing rent, we know that it becomes harder and harder to be a low-income student, especially on this campus at a private university,” Vandenberg said. On Tuesday, Swipe out Hunger, an organization that focuses on food insecurity and homelessness, will host a hunger banquet. Participants will be sorted into varying socioeconomic classes with the purpose of simulating the income disparity and consequences of homelessness in Los Angeles. The week continues on Wednesday with a volunteer and resource fair, which provides students with concrete ways they can help out the USC and South L.A. community. On Thursday, the Fast-A-Thon, during which students pledge to fast for the day, is intended to show students what it’s like to experience food insecurity. It also gives them an opportunity to sponsor a meal for the homeless through the Ansar Service Partnership.The week ends with a public policy discussion titled “Getting Everyone in the Door,” where the Los Angeles Police Department, A Community of Friends and Abundant Housing representatives will discuss policy challenges toward ending homelessness. “We’re going to be inviting different public policy stakeholders from around L.A. to come and speak about their work and also the perspectives that they have on homelessness in L.A.,” said Mae Gates, who will moderate the panel. “We hope to take that discussion and relate it back to certain issues and things that we see here on USC’s campus.” Faizus Amin, the director of Campus Affairs for Student Service Assembly and moderator on the Swipe out Hunger panel, said engaging in Homelessness Awareness Week is an integral aspect of social responsibility in the South L.A. community.“By having this week, we’re educating ourselves as students on what causes homelessness, what homeless life can be like for some people and how we can contribute to ending the cycle of homelessness, which is running rampant through Los Angeles,” Gates said. Vandenberg said participation during Homelessness Awareness Week is a vital way students can help their community on campus. “Sometimes we delude ourselves by thinking that because we’re at a private university and because we have such generous financial aid, that that somehow precludes us from having students [in] need who fall through a lot of those safety nets,” he said. According to Vandenberg, It’s important to spread education and awareness about the consequences of homelessness continually, not just throughout the course of Homelessness Awareness Week.“We’re really trying to make sure that homelessness and addressing it is very interdisciplinary,” Vandenberg said. “Regardless of your background, everyone can and should make a difference.” Amin encouraged students to attend Homelessness Awareness Week events to learn about the nature of homelessness and to venture out beyond the USC community. “Through Hunger and Homelessness Week, we want students to realize that USC is definitely a bubble,” Amin said. “This is not the reality of South L.A. and we should do our part as a member of the South L.A. community and serve those around us.”last_img read more

Men’s basketball prepares for Arizona and Arizona State

first_imgThe USC men’s basketball team has gone 6-7 in its last 13 games after starting the season 13-2. With only three games to go in the regular season, the Trojans have a big test this week against Arizona and Arizona State. The Trojans, who are  11-2 at Galen Center, will be playing at home for the rest of the season. Likewise, veteran senior guard Jonah Mathews has been a leader for USC. The captain has had a strong season this year, scoring 360 points — the second most on the team — through an average of 31.8 minutes per game, more than any other Trojan. Mathews also has 22 more 3-pointers than any other Trojan at 60, and he will need to show up against Arizona after scoring just 6 points against the Wildcats in their last meeting.  Freshman forward Isaiah Mobley is shooting 47.6 % this season while averaging 20.4 minutes a game. (James Wolfe | Daily Trojan) USC hopes to avenge its losses this week as it aims to secure a top-four seed in the Pac-12. By doing so, they will receive a first-round bye in the Pac-12 Tournament. Furthermore, the end goal for the Trojans is to make the NCAA Tournament, an appearance that has eluded them in three years, and their recent loss to an underwhelming Utah team certainly didn’t help their odds.  “If we win those three games, then all will be well,” freshman guard Ethan Anderson told the L.A. Times. The Trojans will first face the Wildcats Thursday in a whiteout game for Trojan fans. The Wildcats will enter the showdown hot, having won six of their last eight games. Arizona nearly beat the No. 14 Oregon Ducks in a 73-72 overtime thriller Saturday. In their previous matchup earlier this month, the Wildcats beat the Trojans 85-80 in one of USC’s higher-scoring games after the Trojans rallied from a 20-point deficit. If the Trojans have any hope of beating the Wildcats this time around, they will have to do a better job of starting out strong. USC is now in sixth place in the Pac-12 standings after being as high as first earlier this season. With Arizona and Arizona State both ahead of the Trojans in the conference, USC will need to start making some noise down the stretch. One player the Trojans have to look out for is junior guard Remy Martin, who has led the Sun Devils in points this season with 517 and minutes with 902. In addition, he is third on the team in rebounds with 88.  Arizona freshman forward Zeke Nnaji has been one of the team’s most productive players this season. Scoring an average of 16.3 points per game and shooting over 50%, Nnaji has been a player that opponents have had difficulty containing.  USC will then take on the now-first-place Sun Devils in a game Saturday at 5 p.m. Though the Sun Devils have a 10-4 conference record, they are not nationally ranked.  Still, the Sun Devils have shocked many Pac-12 teams this year. Riding a seven-game winning streak, ASU has shown no signs of slowing down. The Trojans almost gave the Sun Devils their ninth loss of the season earlier this month but lost 66-64 after giving up a 13-point lead. While the Trojans have not played well as of late, head coach Andy Enfield is keeping the focus on his player’s health. Freshman guard Ethan Anderson will look to rebound after scoring 9 points during a loss to Utah last week. (James Wolfe | Daily Trojan) “It’s tough to reckon with,” Mobley told the L.A. Times on the Trojans’ latest woes. “But we just have to keep fighting. The season isn’t over yet.” “We were just worried about our guys and their health,” Enfield told the Los Angeles Times. “Obviously we want to make the tournament, but we were just worried about our guys. We weren’t thinking about [the tournament].” On the other hand, USC has its own share of high-flying freshmen. Forwards Onyeka Okongwu and Isaiah Mobley have put pressure on their opponents on both ends of the floor. Okongwu has averaged 16.7 points this season while Mobley has averaged more than five rebounds per game. The freshman duo has been a strong point for USC through almost every game they’ve played. Currently on the bubble, USC has gone back and forth between the first four in and first four out for the NCAA Tournament according to many experts. College basketball analyst Andy Katz has USC as the No. 10 seed in the East division in his latest bracket prediction. If the Trojans can steal impressive wins against Arizona and Arizona State and follow that with a win over crosstown rival UCLA, they could solidify their spot in March Madness. The Trojans will begin the crucial weekend against the Wildcats in a 7 p.m. tilt Thursday at Galen Center.last_img read more

Amid swirl of controversy, Lakers introduce Frank Vogel as head coach

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersIf nothing else, Vogel rolled in a surreal morning in which the excitement of the Lakers introducing the coach they hope can break a six-year playoff drought was dampened by dirty laundry airing from the previous season. The former Indiana Pacers and Orlando Magic coach, who has a 304-291 overall record on the sideline, did his best to steer the conversation from the difficult past to what he sees as a team with “tremendous promise.”Inheriting a roster with LeBron James, a number of recent first-round picks, and cap space for an additional star salary and the No. 4 pick in the next draft, Vogel said he was brimming with optimism. But he emphasized that while his success will ultimately be judged by the ability to get back to the postseason – which is an urgent issue for a franchise which has never been shut out from the playoffs for this long – his approach will be characterized by staying present and creating a strong work ethic within the Lakers organization.“We are going to be focused on the work: the day-to-day, stay in the moment,” he said. “How do we get better at practice? How do we win the next game? Focus on the task at hand, and then those accolades, those achievements, those results, they will come.”Among the many awkward questions for the Lakers at Monday’s press conference, General Manager Rob Pelinka was asked to account for how the team came to Vogel after a month-long search for Luke Walton’s replacement that had other favorites before Vogel. Notably, the Lakers were close to terms with Tyronn Lue, who had previously coached James to the 2016 championship with the Cleveland Cavaliers, when negotiations broke down over the length of his contract offer (reportedly just three years) as well as the Lakers desiring to place former Nets and Bucks coach Jason Kidd on his staff.Neither of those appeared to be problems for Vogel, who acknowledged Kidd’s role as one of his assistants and is reportedly on a three-year deal. But Pelinka said Vogel ended up standing out from the initial list of names for his detailed preparation, his outlined vision for the Lakers’ style of play, and his playoff success of reaching back-to-back Eastern Conference finals with the Pacers. Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers PreviousLos Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers player LeBron James watches as his new head coach Frank Vogel, foreground, conducts an interview after Vogel was introduced as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers player LeBron James watches from the back of the gym as Frank Vogel is introduced as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka, left, introduces Frank Vogel as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers player LeBron James wipes his brow as he watches from the back of the gym after Frank Vogel was introduced as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka, left, watches Frank Vogel talks about his role as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka, left, introduces Frank Vogel as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)New Los Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel, left, and general manager Rob Pelinka arrives for a press conference at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers senior basketball advisor Kurt Rambis arrives for the press conference announcing Frank Vogel as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 10Los Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)ExpandEL SEGUNDO — During the hiring process, the Lakers told Frank Vogel something that was immediately reinforced in his first week at work: This ain’t Indiana.That manifested in topsy-turvy fashion on Monday morning, as Vogel spent most of his 26-minute introductory press conference as head coach of the Lakers silently listening as his general manager handled accusations of backstabbing from the outgoing team president.It didn’t throw the 45-year-old New Jersey native off his message – that he’s here to instill a positive, forward-thinking culture to a franchise in need of one – but even Vogel acknowledged it was a little outside his normal operating procedure.“It’s a little different,” Vogel said. “Definitely different than I expected and different than I’ve ever been a part of. But I understand the line of questioning, in light of the events of this morning, so you just roll with the punches.” “Throughout the process, he just continued to emerge as someone that had those qualities I talked about at the beginning of this and we celebrate that,” he said. “He is the coach. He is the right guy for this job.”Vogel shares an agent with Lue and was initially excited to be an assistant on Lue’s staff in Los Angeles. But once Lue bowed out, the Lakers “moved quickly” to interview him for the top coaching job and make him an offer.“It’s very emotional and exciting,” he said from the dais. “I’m not gonna lie, it’s pretty cool to be up here right now.”Vogel’s belief that the future holds brighter things applies to his own coaching style, which he said has evolved since his days in Indiana. A disciple of Rick Pitino, Vogel built Indiana teams which won with defensive grit and just enough on the offensive end. But as the NBA has changed, so has he, he said, and in Orlando, he tried to grow a more 3-point-oriented style that he continued to study into his “sabbatical year” since he was fired from the Magic in 2018.Under his leadership, Vogel said the Lakers will aim to create an “outside-in” approach to offense which will rely on the threat of 3-point shooting to set up attacking the rim. It puts an impetus on the front office to add shooting in free agency to a team that finished 29th in 3-point percentage (33.3). On defense, Vogel will shoot for an inverse approach: a scheme predicated on protecting the rim and the paint first.“I’m really, really excited about the chance to instill my beliefs of how it’s going to look,” Vogel said.Kidd’s hire has incited speculation since it was first reported: As a former assistant coach who has a pre-existing relationship with James who has had sometimes turbulent relationships with coaches and management, outsiders have wondered if Kidd would function as an in-house replacement for Vogel if his tenure gets off to a rough start.Vogel literally laughed at the suggestion.“You can’t worry about looking over your shoulder,” he said. “You gotta worry about getting good damn coaches. That’s how I feel about this hire.”Vogel said he had extensive conversations with Kidd, whose hire has not been officially announced by the organization, and that he believed Kidd would be “an incredible asset” in what he hopes will be a collaborative coaching staff.Asked about Kidd’s history of domestic violence (he pled guilty to spousal abuse in 2000 as a player), Vogel said it did initially concern him, but he and Kidd had spoken about it: “This was something that was in the past and he’s sort of spoken upon it and moved on from it. I believe he’s in a very different place than back then.”Related Articles How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years center_img Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions The introduction was attended by most of the Lakers’ front office staff and several players, most notably James who stood in the wings of the team’s practice facility and did not speak publicly to reporters. Vogel’s Pacers teams twice clashed in the conference finals with James’ Miami Heat teams, once pushing them to seven games before the Heat prevailed. Vogel said his conversations with James had been “very positive,” and he sounded hopeful that the culture he built in Indiana would help inform their future relationship and buy in his investment.He didn’t see a clash of ideology trying to coach a young group along with a veteran of James’ stature: “Every player I’ve ever been around that’s, quite frankly, worth a damn wants to be challenged and wants to be pushed and wants to be coached hard and wants to be held accountable.”Vogel is the latest in an unsteady chain of coaches: He’s the fifth coach the Lakers have hired since Phil Jackson left in 2011. None have lasted longer than Walton, who coached for three years without bringing the Lakers back to the postseason, finishing his final campaign with a 37-45 record marred by injuries.Even on a day when the baggage of the last era was still front and center, Vogel remained undaunted – and promised that true change is forthcoming.“There’s a positive vibe happening with our team right now,” he said. “There really is. OK? And it’s just one of those things where you’re going to have to wait and see, but you’re going to be happy with the product that we put on the floor this year and where we’re going as an organization. You really are.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more