Bold with beauty

first_img“It makes you want to watch more,” Aliyah said. “[Seeing them] painting their face in the best way possible makes you want to sit down with a cup of coffee and watch them do their work.”  When Davis is not experimenting and creating different makeup looks or working on photography, they can be found writing in their journal, filming videos or participating in student organizations, like the Black Student Assembly’s Creative Experience, all of which are key passions in their life. “There are a lot of really helpful resources on there for learning the basics of filming and editing. Every time I’m not too sure about something, I just look up a YouTube tutorial, and those definitely help out a lot,” Davis said. “For makeup, I’d say you’ve just got to practice a lot. So I would literally just do makeup at like 3 in the morning.”  Glam, glitter and bold lashes — since the first moment makeup artist and photographer Avery Davis laid eyes on the dramatic painted faces and elongated winged eyeliner integral to drag queen makeup, they have always been attracted to a bold and colorful aesthetic. From both their professional work and personal creative endeavors on YouTube and Instagram, Davis is an icon on campus known for their dark and beautiful works of art, be it through makeup or photography. In the beginning stages of their makeup journey, Davis said that their favorite beauty influencer was Michelle Phan, a pioneer of the YouTube beauty community, who arguably invented the concept of a beauty guru. Some of their favorite content creators on the YouTube platform include Jackie Aina and Miles Jai, both of whom are YouTubers who produce videos, such as wig reviews and foundation range tests, that cater specifically to the Black community’s experience in beauty.  Their makeup rates range from $45 to $60, totaling $80 to $100 if a photoshoot is included, Davis said. When Davis first began delving into makeup, Davis’ family and friends were greatly supportive of their interest in the art form and their self-starter attitude. Gaining rising popularity on their YouTube channel, Davis also eagerly shares their enthusiasm for makeup artistry online through storytimes and “Get Ready With Me” style videos. One of Davis’ goals as an influencer is to be an active role model, encouraging others to disregard hateful opinions and freely express themselves. Photo courtesy of Avery Davis Davis’ self-confidence has allowed them to pursue bold and transformative looks, featuring dramatic eyelashes, reflective glitter and colorful rhinestones. Some of these looks include drag and pride makeup, and tutorials for them can be found on Davis’ YouTube channel. Davis said they are interested in pursuing YouTube as a career if it takes off in the future, but as of now, they use it as a creative outlet to share their passion for makeup and explore content creation. Described by USC alumna Kenya Aliyah, a close friend of Davis, their YouTube videos are almost like ASMR.  Their online presence on Instagram and YouTube has also been met with positive engagement, and  Davis hopes to grow their following to be an inspiration for more makeup enthusiasts.  Aliyah, who has modeled for Davis several times, described the photoshoot process as very professional, yet fun and collaborative. Though Aliyah was new to modeling when she worked with Davis for the first time, they shared creative freedom in order for Davis’ characteristic dark and beautiful aesthetic to shine through. “Sometimes I’ll be like, ‘I want something really smoky,’ or ‘I want the base makeup and face to look really shiny,’ and just go off of that,” Davis said. “But  I don’t have a set goal or look in mind.”   “I did experience having some people who would make unnecessary comments when I was in high school, but also, I didn’t really care, so I was like, ‘Oh, OK,’” Davis said. “But I was also reaching a place where I … stopped listening and caring about what other people think.”  When creating looks, Davis normally waits for some inspiration or chooses to highlight a certain facial feature such as a cut crease eyeshadow look or a glossy lip. “I have a couple goals. One of them would be to almost be on the same level as Pat McGrath [self-made billionare], where it’s like I’m able to participate in runway makeup,” they said. “And even just having a makeup look get published by a really highly established publication … or to just be published in a Hollywood publication — that would be really nice.”center_img One of Davis’ favorite looks is more avant garde.  “Most times I’ll let them take creative freedom because I really trust their judgment,” Evins said. “All issues always come out really amazing, so I plan to just let them do their thing and like come up with their own ideas, because it never fails, honestly.” For aspiring makeup artists and beginner photographers, Davis recommends checking out YouTube.  “I don’t have an audience yet, and [it’s] just people commenting so that’s nice,” Davis said.  As a professional, one of Davis’ most memorable jobs was doing makeup for UMI for her music video, “High School,” released in 2019. For those interested in hiring Davis for freelance makeup and photography work, Davis said they are flexible with monetizing their creativity, prioritizing the art form itself.  A senior majoring in cinema and media studies, Davis serves and centers bold and daring looks on their Instagram, @stayservinglooks. Davis grew up in Compton and has been practicing makeup for about six years. Like many aspiring makeup artists, their journey began out of simple curiosity coupled with the need for a creative outlet to balance the stress of school and express their sense of identity.  “I have no brows, and it’s more of a blue look. And I just really like that one because I think my eyeliner looked really good that day,” Davis said, laughing.   “It was easier for my family to support me because like all of the makeup I had, I bought myself,” Davis said.  Discovering popular beauty gurus on YouTube to learn skills and find inspiration helped Davis gain increasing confidence in their makeup looks. They later decided to dive into the field of photography to capture and share the beauty of their makeup artistry. Branching off into photography inspired Davis to practice professionally and help others in the creative process of sharing their art. USC alumna Ryan Evins has also worked with Davis on album art for her music career and is eager to keep working with them in the future.  “[Davis’ aesthetic] is bold and colorful and has a message behind it — something that you’ve never seen before,” Giná said. “[There’s an] idea and thought behind it, like [each photo] based on the persona that they’re trying to recreate. They love glam, they love lashes, they love glitter, so they’re very expressive.” A future project Davis has in mind is with USC alumna Tiah Giná in a futuristic Afro-centric photoshoot. According to Giná, Davis’ strong suit is their expressiveness and boldness with painting colors and shapes on the face.  “I feel like the beauty of the muse and the photograph [always shines in] every photo I see,” Aliyah said. “I feel like you can really see the person and there’s always like a story behind it.”  Despite the familial support and online encouragement of their 1,501 followers on Instagram, Davis has also encountered some negativity along the way, but it has failed to faze them.last_img read more

Scott Shafer hopes to have Eric Dungey back this week

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 26, 2015 at 5:19 pm Contact Matt: mcschnei@syr.edu | @matt_schneidman Scott Shafer hopes to get freshman quarterback Eric Dungey back in the beginning or middle of the upcoming week, the head coach said following Syracuse’s 34-24 loss to No. 8 LSU (3-0, 2-0 Southeastern) on Saturday.In Dungey’s place, sophomore walk-on Zack Mahoney went 16-of-38 for 154 yards passing and three touchdowns. He did throw an interception and fumbled on the first drive after being sacked, but his second-half performance allowed SU (3-1, 1-0 Atlantic Coast) to stay within striking distance until late in the fourth.The freshman, who suffered an upper-body injury after a helmet-to-helmet hit from Central Michigan defensive lineman Mitch Stanitzek, will be evaluated again tomorrow.“I can tell you he’s doing well,” Shafer said. “Hopefully we get Eric back here pretty quick, we’ll follow the whole protocol and make sure he’s in good shape.”Shafer added it’s going to take a few days to be sure Dungey is ready to return, but Syracuse’s bye week certainly doesn’t hurt. The Orange returns to action against South Florida on Oct. 10 in Tampa, Florida.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more

On deck: Reds at Dodgers, Sunday, 1:10 p.m.

first_imgTV: SportsNet LA (where available)Where: Dodger StadiumTHE PITCHERS Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error LHP HYUN-JIN RYU (2-6, 4.08 ERA)Vs. Reds: 2-1, 3.54 ERAAt Dodger Stadium: 13-10, 3.23 ERAcenter_img Hates to face: Arismendy Alcantara, 3 for 4 (.750), 1 doubleLoves to face: Zack Cozart, 0 for 7, 4 strikeoutsRHP TIM ADLEMAN (4-2, 4.42 ERA)Vs. Dodgers: 1-0, 0.00 ERAAt Dodger Stadium: Has never pitched there beforeHates to face: Adrian Gonzalez, 1 for 3 (.333), 1 doubleLoves to face: Yasmani Grandal, 0 for 2last_img

Amid swirl of controversy, Lakers introduce Frank Vogel as head coach

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREUCLA alum Kenny Clark signs four-year contract extension with PackersIf nothing else, Vogel rolled in a surreal morning in which the excitement of the Lakers introducing the coach they hope can break a six-year playoff drought was dampened by dirty laundry airing from the previous season. The former Indiana Pacers and Orlando Magic coach, who has a 304-291 overall record on the sideline, did his best to steer the conversation from the difficult past to what he sees as a team with “tremendous promise.”Inheriting a roster with LeBron James, a number of recent first-round picks, and cap space for an additional star salary and the No. 4 pick in the next draft, Vogel said he was brimming with optimism. But he emphasized that while his success will ultimately be judged by the ability to get back to the postseason – which is an urgent issue for a franchise which has never been shut out from the playoffs for this long – his approach will be characterized by staying present and creating a strong work ethic within the Lakers organization.“We are going to be focused on the work: the day-to-day, stay in the moment,” he said. “How do we get better at practice? How do we win the next game? Focus on the task at hand, and then those accolades, those achievements, those results, they will come.”Among the many awkward questions for the Lakers at Monday’s press conference, General Manager Rob Pelinka was asked to account for how the team came to Vogel after a month-long search for Luke Walton’s replacement that had other favorites before Vogel. Notably, the Lakers were close to terms with Tyronn Lue, who had previously coached James to the 2016 championship with the Cleveland Cavaliers, when negotiations broke down over the length of his contract offer (reportedly just three years) as well as the Lakers desiring to place former Nets and Bucks coach Jason Kidd on his staff.Neither of those appeared to be problems for Vogel, who acknowledged Kidd’s role as one of his assistants and is reportedly on a three-year deal. But Pelinka said Vogel ended up standing out from the initial list of names for his detailed preparation, his outlined vision for the Lakers’ style of play, and his playoff success of reaching back-to-back Eastern Conference finals with the Pacers. Lakers, Clippers schedules set for first round of NBA playoffs Trail Blazers beat Grizzlies in play-in, earn first-round series with the Lakers PreviousLos Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers player LeBron James watches as his new head coach Frank Vogel, foreground, conducts an interview after Vogel was introduced as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsLos Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers player LeBron James watches from the back of the gym as Frank Vogel is introduced as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka, left, introduces Frank Vogel as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers player LeBron James wipes his brow as he watches from the back of the gym after Frank Vogel was introduced as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka, left, watches Frank Vogel talks about his role as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka, left, introduces Frank Vogel as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)New Los Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel, left, and general manager Rob Pelinka arrives for a press conference at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers senior basketball advisor Kurt Rambis arrives for the press conference announcing Frank Vogel as the Lakers new head coach at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)Los Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)NextShow Caption1 of 10Los Angeles Lakers head coach Frank Vogel conducts an interview at their training facility in El Segundo on Monday, May 20, 2019. Vogel was most recently the head coach at the Orlando Magic. (Photo by Scott Varley, Daily Breeze/SCNG)ExpandEL SEGUNDO — During the hiring process, the Lakers told Frank Vogel something that was immediately reinforced in his first week at work: This ain’t Indiana.That manifested in topsy-turvy fashion on Monday morning, as Vogel spent most of his 26-minute introductory press conference as head coach of the Lakers silently listening as his general manager handled accusations of backstabbing from the outgoing team president.It didn’t throw the 45-year-old New Jersey native off his message – that he’s here to instill a positive, forward-thinking culture to a franchise in need of one – but even Vogel acknowledged it was a little outside his normal operating procedure.“It’s a little different,” Vogel said. “Definitely different than I expected and different than I’ve ever been a part of. But I understand the line of questioning, in light of the events of this morning, so you just roll with the punches.” “Throughout the process, he just continued to emerge as someone that had those qualities I talked about at the beginning of this and we celebrate that,” he said. “He is the coach. He is the right guy for this job.”Vogel shares an agent with Lue and was initially excited to be an assistant on Lue’s staff in Los Angeles. But once Lue bowed out, the Lakers “moved quickly” to interview him for the top coaching job and make him an offer.“It’s very emotional and exciting,” he said from the dais. “I’m not gonna lie, it’s pretty cool to be up here right now.”Vogel’s belief that the future holds brighter things applies to his own coaching style, which he said has evolved since his days in Indiana. A disciple of Rick Pitino, Vogel built Indiana teams which won with defensive grit and just enough on the offensive end. But as the NBA has changed, so has he, he said, and in Orlando, he tried to grow a more 3-point-oriented style that he continued to study into his “sabbatical year” since he was fired from the Magic in 2018.Under his leadership, Vogel said the Lakers will aim to create an “outside-in” approach to offense which will rely on the threat of 3-point shooting to set up attacking the rim. It puts an impetus on the front office to add shooting in free agency to a team that finished 29th in 3-point percentage (33.3). On defense, Vogel will shoot for an inverse approach: a scheme predicated on protecting the rim and the paint first.“I’m really, really excited about the chance to instill my beliefs of how it’s going to look,” Vogel said.Kidd’s hire has incited speculation since it was first reported: As a former assistant coach who has a pre-existing relationship with James who has had sometimes turbulent relationships with coaches and management, outsiders have wondered if Kidd would function as an in-house replacement for Vogel if his tenure gets off to a rough start.Vogel literally laughed at the suggestion.“You can’t worry about looking over your shoulder,” he said. “You gotta worry about getting good damn coaches. That’s how I feel about this hire.”Vogel said he had extensive conversations with Kidd, whose hire has not been officially announced by the organization, and that he believed Kidd would be “an incredible asset” in what he hopes will be a collaborative coaching staff.Asked about Kidd’s history of domestic violence (he pled guilty to spousal abuse in 2000 as a player), Vogel said it did initially concern him, but he and Kidd had spoken about it: “This was something that was in the past and he’s sort of spoken upon it and moved on from it. I believe he’s in a very different place than back then.”Related Articles How athletes protesting the national anthem has evolved over 17 years center_img Trail Blazers, Grizzlies advance to NBA play-in game; Suns, Spurs see playoff dreams dashed Lakers practice early hoping to answer all questions The introduction was attended by most of the Lakers’ front office staff and several players, most notably James who stood in the wings of the team’s practice facility and did not speak publicly to reporters. Vogel’s Pacers teams twice clashed in the conference finals with James’ Miami Heat teams, once pushing them to seven games before the Heat prevailed. Vogel said his conversations with James had been “very positive,” and he sounded hopeful that the culture he built in Indiana would help inform their future relationship and buy in his investment.He didn’t see a clash of ideology trying to coach a young group along with a veteran of James’ stature: “Every player I’ve ever been around that’s, quite frankly, worth a damn wants to be challenged and wants to be pushed and wants to be coached hard and wants to be held accountable.”Vogel is the latest in an unsteady chain of coaches: He’s the fifth coach the Lakers have hired since Phil Jackson left in 2011. None have lasted longer than Walton, who coached for three years without bringing the Lakers back to the postseason, finishing his final campaign with a 37-45 record marred by injuries.Even on a day when the baggage of the last era was still front and center, Vogel remained undaunted – and promised that true change is forthcoming.“There’s a positive vibe happening with our team right now,” he said. “There really is. OK? And it’s just one of those things where you’re going to have to wait and see, but you’re going to be happy with the product that we put on the floor this year and where we’re going as an organization. You really are.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more