Gov. Wolf: Pennsylvania Reduced Prison Population by Record-Setting 3,471 since March 1

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 22, 2020 Criminal Justice Reform,  Press Release,  Prison Reform Governor Tom Wolf announced today that since March 1, the population of those in state correctional facilities has been reduced by 3,471 individuals, the largest multiple-month decrease ever experienced by the Department of Corrections and one that likely helped the department reduce the number of COVID-19 cases in facilities.“When COVID-19 arrived, the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections met the challenge of keeping the general public safe while protecting its inmate population from this easily transmissible disease,” Gov. Wolf said. “The department has been successful at keeping COVID-19 from spreading widely in the congregate settings of correctional facilities.”In the three-plus months since COVID-19 was first identified in Pennsylvania, less than 1 percent of the state prison population has tested positive. Ultimately, the inmates inside state correctional institutions have proven so far to be more secure from COVID-19 than the general population, where the mortality rate is 90% higher than it is in the state’s correctional facilities as of today.The population reduction includes furloughing paroled individuals from centers to home plans; working with the parole board to maximize parole releases; reviewing parole detainers for those in county jails and state prisons; expediting the release process for anyone with a pending approved home plan; reviewing and releasing inmates who are beyond their minimum sentences; and implementing the temporary reprieve program that has allowed Gov. Wolf to issue reprieves to 159 inmates during the pandemic.These releases are in addition to preexisting criminal justice reform efforts that have reduced Pennsylvania’s prison population from 48,881 inmates when Gov. Wolf entered office at the beginning of January 2015 to 41,738 inmates today. That 7,143 decrease in population in under five years has allowed the state to reduce taxpayer costs by closing facilities while enabling more Pennsylvanians to resume their lives – all without an increase in the state’s crime rate.“The Department of Corrections takes pride in its ability to keep inmates safe and will continue to prioritize health and wellness during the COVID-19 crisis,” DOC Sec. John Wetzel said. “We will continue to seek improvements in our criminal justice system that minimizes the number of incarcerated individuals while providing the highest degree of safety to every Pennsylvanian.”Pennsylvania has taken a bipartisan approach to criminal justice reform and in recent years has:Passed Justice Reinvestment 2 addressing the high cost of incarceration in the state, strengthening support for county probation programs and fixing inadequate sentencing guidelines, and reforming the post-trial criminal justice system.Created a Fair-Chance hiring policy for state agencies that removes the criminal conviction question, otherwise known as “banning the box,” from non-civil service employment applications for agencies under the governor’s jurisdiction.Signed the “Clean Slate” bill, the first of its kind in the nation, to help those who have committed low-level offenses and have paid their penalty get back on the path to a blemish-free record, removing potential roadblocks to jobs, housing, health care, and education.Signed Act 95 of 2018, eliminating driver’s license suspensions for non-driving infractions.Signed Act 146 of 2018, extending the time a convicted individual has to file a post-conviction relief action to one year, from what was 60 days under current law.Signed Act 147 of 2018, updating Pennsylvania’s DNA testing law to reflect significant advances in technology and the lessons learned by criminal justice professionals since 2002. The legislation removes the supervision requirement that only people serving a sentence can apply for DNA testing.Signed Act 148 of 2018, a victim protection bill regarding housing options and emergency transfers.Find more information on Pennsylvania’s response to COVID-19.Find more information on Gov. Wolf’s Process to Reopen PA.Ver esta página en español.center_img Gov. Wolf: Pennsylvania Reduced Prison Population by Record-Setting 3,471 since March 1last_img read more

Sergio Aguero ready to return to his best, promises Pellegrini

first_img Pellegrini is aware of this, and knows the rewards are worth waiting for from a player who scored five against Newcastle in a stunning performance in October and plundered 31 goals from 42 appearances last season. The City manager said: “As we know with Sergio, always when he comes back from an injury he needs three or four games to return to his normal performance. “That’s why I never give him 90 minutes in a game. I think it’s better to play him for less minutes but with more intensity. “But I am sure in the second part of the season we are going to see the real Sergio without injuries.” Asked when Aguero might be ready to play a full game, Pellegrini said: “I hope on Saturday and he scores two or three goals.” City travel to Watford on Saturday looking for their first away win in seven. City’s other senior striker Wilfried Bony has struggled to impose himself in Aguero’s absences – which also include a spell out in autumn with a hamstring injury – and has been criticised by fans. But the Ivorian, who has also been hampered by injuries and a bout of malaria since his £28million move from Swansea last January, is determined to turn the situation around. Bony said: “Obviously I’ve had problems with injuries and I was ill, but this is football. For five years I haven’t been in this position, but sometimes you can’t control what’s happening. I just try to do my best every game. My hopes for 2016 are to be fit for the whole season and to win a trophy for City.” Bony has scored in four of his last seven appearances, and has eight for the campaign, but has also spurned a host of other chances. The 27-year-old said: “Scoring goals is most important for getting the confidence back. I know what I can do. Your first enemy is yourself so I just think about doing better and trying very hard to do my best in every game.” Press Association Manuel Pellegrini is convinced star striker Sergio Aguero will soon be firing for Manchester City. Aguero has produced two largely ineffectual performances for City since returning from a heel injury. But this is not surprising, with history suggesting it often takes the Argentinian a number of games to get back up to full speed following a lay-off. last_img read more

Clippers’ Sindarius Thornwell celebrates a daughter, mourns a father and chases his hoop dreams

first_imgHis lap bar down and secured, Sindarius Thornwell is on one heck of a roller coaster ride, determined to keep it moving.He’s getting after it at Clippers training camp, which tipped off Tuesday at the University of Hawaii exactly one week after Thornwell’s father, Gregory Wade, died in his sleep, the victim of a heart attack at age 46.Five days before he lost his dad, Thornwell’s daughter, Skyla-Love, was born.Thornwell arrived in Honolulu, where he’s competing for a job, thinking about them. “I’ve been up and down the last month or so, but it’s life,” Thornwell said by phone from Hawaii following the team’s first official practice. “Today was fun. It’s easy to come out and practice because that’s what my dad would have wanted; it was his dream to see me play (in the NBA) and have success in basketball. That’s my motivation – to keep making him proud, you know?”Sign up for Home Turf and get exclusive stories every SoCal sports fan must read, sent daily. Subscribe here.Thornwell, 23, enters his second NBA season as one of 17 players fighting for 15 spots on the Clippers’ roster. He’s among the team’s nine listed guards, though Coach Doc Rivers seems open-minded about it, having indicated that the 6-foot-5 Thornwell, “whatever he is,” could also be useful as a small forward.In 15.8 minutes per game last season, Thornwell averaged 3.9 points, 1.9 rebounds and 0.9 assists. He also collected nine “Did Not Plays,” including seven in nine games in February. The appearances he made on the floor in that span lasted 32 and 33 seconds, respectively.At media day, he spoke openly about how much that stung, what a reality check it proved to be, and how it led to important professional development.“When I was getting those DNPs … I knew I was in a hole and Doc wasn’t calling on me, so I came in every day and treated my workouts like games,” Thornwell said. “My worst experience ever was in Phoenix, we were up 30 the whole game and I didn’t get in the game until like the last 10 seconds. I never wanted to feel like that (again), so I took everything more seriously, I came in and started to act like a pro. And it translated when I got my shot again, and I finished the year pretty strong.” For Lakers’ LeBron James, Jacob Blake’s shooting is bigger issue than a big Game 4 victory Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Clippers vs. Mavericks Game 5 playoff updates from NBA beat reporters After playing in only three games the previous month, Thornwell played every game in March, starting seven of them.Ups and downs, you know?Thornwell also lost his uncle, Dajuan Thornwell, with whom he was especially close, just before the 2015 basketball season, on Sept. 17 – three years and a day before Wade’s death last week.Sindarius Thornwell was a junior at South Carolina then, and he went on to make the SEC All-Defensive Team that season, foreshadowing for the following year when he threw college hoops for a loop, leading the seventh-seeded Gamecocks to a second-round upset of second-seeded Duke and then all the way to the Final Four.For his efforts, Thornwell became South Carolina’s first player in 11 years to be drafted into the NBA, selected 48th by the Milwaukee Bucks and traded to the Clippers for cash considerations.Last week, Thornwell posted footage from the celebration that followed his selection on social media. Wade is at the center of it, glowing, telling people how proud he is.“He was the light in the room,” Thornwell said of his dad, who loved motorcycles and the Dallas Cowboys. “He was the guy who came in and made everybody laugh. If you were in a bad mood, he’d bring a smile to your face – that’s what you saw on Instagram in the video.”Thornwell said he’s doing all right, and that his family is doing OK, too.“We have each other’s back and we’re holding each other up,” Thornwell said. “We can’t bring him back, so we’re just taking it one day at a time.”On the court, Thornwell said that means getting to work, having fun “just coming in and trying to mix it up a little and stay active.”“It’s like nothing matters when you’re on the court but basketball,” he added. “Whatever problems or whatever’s happening, when you’re able to step onto the court, you’re able to separate from it, you know?”Related Articles What the Clippers are saying the day after Luka Doncic’s game-winner tied series, 2-2 Clippers hope they can play to their capabilities, quell Mavericks’ momentum Kristaps Porzingis ruled out as Clippers, Mavericks set for Game 5; Follow for game updates last_img read more

Farmers get weather break but crops remain behind schedule

first_imgDES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Farmers in Iowa finally got a break in the weather last week to catch up on planting, but the U.S. Department of Agriculture says the state remains significantly behind average seasons in crop development.The USDA reported Monday that Iowa farmers have now planted 93% of the corn crop, about three weeks behind the five-year average.For soybeans, the Iowa crop is 70% planted, about 17 days behind the average for this time of year.last_img

Wildfires pop up near Chisana and Tanana

first_imgA photo of the Red Hill Fire taken Saturday evening. The fire, estimated at 1 acre, is approximately 100 miles northeast of Glennallen and 1.8 miles northeast of Chisana. (Luke Wassick/National Park Service)Recent warm, dry weather in the interior has resulted in two late season wildfires. State Forestry reports sending fire fighters last night to a one-acre blaze, located about a hundred miles northeast of Glennallen, near Chisana.Listen nowThe department said the fire, burning in Wrangle St. Elias National Park and Preserve, was observed to be creeping and smoldering with light rain falling on it last night. Forestry said the fire is not accessible by road, and weather prevented firefighters from getting to it last night.The other new fire was reported last week by a boater along the Tanana River, on a Native land allotment about 15 miles downstream from Nenana. The Alaska Fire Service said two firefighters went to the site Friday to work the fire, which was estimated at less than an acre, with activity again described as smoldering and creeping.Both fires are suspected to be human-caused. State and federal agencies say Alaska has minimal staff on hand to fight fires in Alaska right now, as most are deployed to the battle major blazes in the western Lower 48.The AFS says nearly 653,000 acres have burned in Alaska so far this year, well below the normal average of one to two million acres.last_img read more