“Azalea Lace Bugs”

first_imgAs another winter turns to spring, bears aren’t the only things coming out of hibernation. Azalea lace bugs are waking up, too, and will soon damage prized azaleas if homeowners don’t take action. Azalea lace bugs are the main pests of landscape azaleas, say University of Georgia entomologists. The insect with the beautiful, lacy wings can cause ugly damage to azalea foliage. Lace bugs feed on the underside of leaves and extract the contents of the upper layer of cells. This causes the azalea leaves to appear bleached or mottled. Braman said a properly scheduled insecticide application will get rid of these nymphs before they mature and have time to lay eggs.”If you don’t kill them before May, they will have laid eggs, and you’ll have to spray several times,” she said. If not controlled, azalea lace bugs can produce four generations from spring to fall. “If you kill this first generation,” she said, “you may not have to spray again.” UGA entomologists urge homeowners to use less toxic insecticides to save the good bugs in the landscape. “Using less toxic insecticides allows you to conserve beneficial insects like the parasitic wasps and spiders that feed on lace bugs,” Braman said. “Horticultural oils and insecticidal soaps have been around a long time,” she said. “People are using them more now. But you need to remember that these are strictly contact insecticides.” Contact insecticides must be sprayed on the insects. They work best on soft-bodied bugs like aphids and lace bugs. “They have no residual activity on the leaves,” Braman said, “So beneficial insects can walk on that leaf surface, after the fact, and not be killed. Good contact with lace bugs on the underside of the leaves is important for good control.” Download the grayscale .TIF — 1.63 M If homeowners don’t spray for azalea lace bugs, Braman said, young plants will suffer the most damage.”In our research,” she said, “we have observed that older plants, those that have been in the landscape for several years, can withstand more lace bug damage. They can tolerate some damage because they have well-established root systems and are not already under stress like a newly transplanted azalea.” Braman said this is one reason homeowners keep replacing young plants year after year. Kris Braman, an entomologist with the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, said early spring is the perfect time to check plants for azalea lace bugs. Controlling them now, while they’re young, is the key, she said.”The azalea lace bug spends the winter as an egg inside your azaleas’ leaves,” Braman said. “Now that the temperatures are warming, the eggs are beginning to hatch. And newly emerged nymphs are beginning to feed.” Download the color .TIF — 6.54 M. “If you wait too long to spray, the nymphs will become egg-laying adults. And you will have to fight all stages of lace bugs,” she said. “Unfortunately, the egg stage is not affected by insecticides.” Download the color .TIF — 5.58 M. Download the grayscale .TIF — 1.40 M.last_img read more

Indonesia brings graft fugitive Djoko Tjandra back from Malaysia

first_imgThe National Police has brought Djoko Soegiarto Tjandra, a fugitive and graft convict who had been on the run for 11 years, back to Indonesia after arresting him in Malaysia on Thursday.Guarded by personnel of the police’s Criminal Investigation Unit (Bareskrim), Djoko landed at Halim Perdanakusuma International Airport in East Jakarta on Thursday evening.Bareskrim head Comr. Gen. Listyo Sigit Prabowo said the arrest had been made possible through cooperation between Indonesian police and their Malaysian counterparts. Djoko was first arrested in September 1999 for his involvement in the high-profile Bank Bali corruption case. He was acquitted by the South Jakarta District Court in 2000.After the AGO filed a request for review, the Supreme Court sentenced Djoko to two years of imprisonment in 2009 and ordered him to pay Rp 546 billion (US$54 million) in restitution. However, Djoko fled to Papua New Guinea a day before the court ruling and had remained at large ever since.Djoko recently made headlines as he managed to return to the country undetected and request a case review over his conviction with the South Jakarta District Court in early June. He reportedly filed his plea after obtaining a new electronic ID card and passport, in addition to having his Interpol red notice status lifted.The court, however, dropped his case review plea on Tuesday after Djoko, who was reported to be residing in Malaysia, failed to show up for the hearing four times. Djoko’s legal team said that the fugitive was not able to attend trial due to his poor health.Topics : “The National Police chief sent a letter to the Malaysian police to help with searching the fugitive and, Alhamdulillah [thank God], we managed to locate him [on Thursday] afternoon,” he said in a televised statement after arriving at the airport.“This is also the answer to public doubts as to whether the police could catch [the fugitive], and today we have [delivered on] our commitment to arrest Djoko Tjandra,” Listyo said as he thanked the Malaysian police for cooperating with the arrest.Read also: Cop accused of issuing travel letters for fugitive Djoko Tjandra faces multiple chargesFollowing his arrival, Djoko was immediately taken to the Bareskrim headquarters for further questioning.last_img read more

IMCA Speedway Motors Weekly Racing National Point Standings Through July 25

first_imgIMCA Modifieds – 1. Jordan Grabouski, Beatrice, Neb., 1,173; 2. Cory Sample, Winnemucca, Nev., 1,160; 3. Chaz Baca, Mesa, Ariz., 1,133; 4. Kelly Shryock, Fertile, Iowa, 1,119; 5. Jeffrey Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 1,111; 6. Jay Noteboom, Hinton, Iowa, 1,101; 7. William Gould, Calera, Okla., 1,080; 8. Bryce Garnhart, Shannon, Ill., 1,075; 9. Matt Guillaume, Haslet, Texas, 1,073; 10. Drew Armstrong, Alexander, Ark., 1,070; 11. Troy Cordes, Dunkerton, Iowa, 1,054; 12. Colin Deming, Hobbs, N.M., 1,051; 13. Rob Slott, New Waverly, Texas, 1,044; 14. Tim Ward, Chandler, Ariz., 1,040; 15. Josh McGaha, Abilene, Texas, 1,033; 16. Bricen James, Albany, Ore., 1,009; 17. Chris Morris, Taylor, Texas, 1,006; 18. Kelsie Foley, Tucson, Ariz., 1,003; 19. Shane DeMey, Denison, Iowa, 998; 20. Nick Meyer, Whittemore, Iowa, 996.IMCA Late Models – 1. Matt Ryan, Davenport, Iowa, 781; 2. Jeremiah Hurst, Dubuque, Iowa, 777; 3. Todd Cooney, Pleasant Hill, Iowa, 776; 4. Andy Nezworski, Buffalo, Iowa, 769; 5. Rob Toland, Colona, Ill., 746; 6. Ryan Dolan, Lisbon, Iowa, 709; 7. Joe Zrostlik, Long Grove, Iowa, 663; 8. Chuck Hanna, Port Byron, Ill., 662; 9. Chad Holladay, Muscatine, Iowa, 623; 10. Eric Sanders, Sherrard, Ill., 615; 11. Joe Ross, Thomson, Ill., 594; 12. Darrel DeFrance, Marshalltown, Iowa, 583; 13. Curt Schroeder, Newton, Iowa, 580; 14. Gary Webb, Blue Grass, Iowa, 577; 15. Shawn Cooney, Bondurant, Iowa, 550; 16. Nick Marolf, Moscow, Iowa, 543; 17. Tim Simpson, Iowa City, Iowa, 523; 18. Chad Coyne, Orion, Ill., 511; 19. Terry Neal, Ely, Iowa, 492; 20. B.J. Jackson, Clinton, Iowa, 481.IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars – 1. Kevin Ramey, Fort Worth, Texas, 787; 2. Tyler Drueke, Eagle, Neb., 753; 3. Matt Richards, Lincoln, Neb., 735; 4. Austin Mundie, Carrollton, Texas, 727; 5. Mike Houseman, Des Moines, Iowa, 681; 6. Robert Vetter, Wolfe City, Texas, 669; 7. Colin Smith, Sheldon, Iowa, 644; 8. Casey Burkham, Combine, Texas, 633; 9. Zach Blurton, Quinter, Kan., 630; 10. Jason Martin, Lincoln, Neb., 625; 11. Kenneth Duke, Selinsgrove, Pa., and Chip Graham, Lewisville, Texas, both 618; 13. Tucker Doughty, Sunnyvale, Texas, 612; 14. Steve McMackin, Greenville, Texas, 596; 15. Kyle A. Ganoe, Thompsontown, Pa., 587; 16. Elliot Amdahl, Flandreau, S.D., 561; 17. Stuart Snyder, Lincoln, Neb., 560; 18. Zach Newlin, Millerstown, Pa., 552; 19. Toby Chapman, Panama, Neb., 546; 20. Andy Shouse, Oklahoma City, Okla., 544.IMCA Sunoco Stock Cars – 1. Mike Nichols, Harlan, Iowa, 1,200; 2. John Oliver Jr., Danville, Iowa, 1,160; 3. Damon Murty, Chelsea, Iowa, 1,119; 4. Mark Adams, Fort Worth, Texas, 1,101; 5. Westin Abbey, Comanche, Texas, 1,085; 6. Andy Roller, Waco, Texas, 1,077; 7. Troy Burkhart, Hays, Kan., 1,076; 8. Damon Hammond, Burleson, Texas, 1,065; 9. Bryce Pritchett, Combine, Texas, 1,055; 10. Dan Mackenthun, Hamburg, Minn., 1,031; 11. Colin Heim, Hoxie, Kan., 991; 12. Calvin Lange, Humboldt, Iowa, 986; 13. Jason Rogers, Selden, Kan., and Tyler Pickett, Boxholm, Iowa, both 970; 15. Shelby Williams, Bonham, Texas, 965; 16. Jay Schmidt, Tama, Iowa, 959; 17. Aaron Corley, Meadow, Texas, 957; 18. Kevin Opheim, Mason City, Iowa, 954; 19. Chris Heim, Hoxie, Kan., 935; 20. Troy Jerovetz, Webster City, Iowa, 914.IMCA Sunoco Hobby Stocks – 1. Shannon Anderson, New Virginia, Iowa, 1,195; 2. Leah Wroten, Independence, Iowa, 1,151; 3. Jeff Ware, Columbus, Neb., 1,137; 4. Tathan Burkhart, Hays, Kan., 1,118; 5. Cody Williams, Minneapolis, Kan., 1,100; 6. Brady Bencken, Oakley, Kan., 1,060; 7. Justin Wacha, Vinton, Iowa, 1,041; 8. Adam Goff, Minot, N.D., 1,026; 9. Bryce Sommerfeld, Fort Dodge, Iowa, 1,024; 10. Cory Probst, Brewster, Minn., 975; 11. Adam Ayers, Adair, Iowa, 955; 12. Drew Barglof, Sioux Rapids, Iowa, 942; 13. Brooke Russell, Hays, Kan., 931; 14. Cameron Wilkinson, Neligh, Neb., 928; 15. Allyn Myers, Berwyn, Neb., 925; 16. Colby Kaspar, Columbus, Neb., 913; 17. Tim Gonska, Brainerd, Minn., 908; 18. Brandon Nielsen, Spencer, Iowa, 887; 19. Luke Wassom, Broken Bow, Neb., 883; 20. Roy Armstrong, Beatrice, Neb., 863.Karl Chevrolet Northern SportMods – 1. Chase Alves, Chandler, Ariz., 1,164; 2. Jason George, Laveen, Ariz., 1,150; 3. Tyler Soppe, Sherrill, Iowa, 1,145; 4. Cody Thompson, Sioux City, Iowa, 1,121; 5. Dakota Sproul, Hays, Kan., 1,120; 6. Tony Olson, Cedar Rapids, Iowa, 1,115; 7. Ethan Braaksma, Newton, Iowa, 1,106; 8. Colby Fett, Algona, Iowa, 1,103; 9. Austin Howes, Memphis, Mo., 1,095; 10. Matthew Looft, Swea City, Iowa, 1,090; 11. Austen Becerra, Carthage, Ill., 1,089; 12. Brandon Setser, Davenport, Iowa, 1,083; 13. Jake McBirnie, Boone, Iowa, 1,071; 14. Austin Svoboda, David City, Neb., and Arie Schouten, Blair, Neb., both 1,036; 16. Johnathon D. Logue, Boone, Iowa, 1,032; 17. Austin Luellen, Minburn, Iowa, 1,031; 18. Tyler Watts, Beloit, Kan., 1,030; 19. Lucas Lamberies, Clintonville, Wis., 980; 20. Justin Svoboda, David City, Neb., 973.Smiley’s Racing Products Southern SportMods – 1. Gabe Tucker, Carbon, Texas, 1,165; 2. Rodney White, Ector, Texas, 1,144; 3. Jake Upchurch, Grand Prairie, Texas, 1,113; 4. Tyler Bragg, Springtown, Texas, 1,090; 5. Trevor Raney, Sherman, Texas, 1,089; 6. Taylor Florio, Copperas Cove, Texas, 1,064; 7. Kyle Wilkins, Italy, Texas, 980; 8. Dustin Robinson, Post, Texas, 961; 9. James Skinner, Burleson, Texas, 800; 10. Cory Williams, Slaton, Texas, 745; 11. Hayden Wade, Waco, Texas, 718; 12. J.P. Vasquez Jr., Lubbock, Texas, Justin Nabors, Kemp, Texas, James Hanusch, Belton, Texas, and Ryan Thomas, Lubbock, Texas, each 705; 16. Chris Cogburn, Robinson, Texas, 695; 17. Edward Grmela Jr., Hewitt, Texas, 688; 18. Nick Clinkenbeard, Weatherford, Texas, 673; 19. Chase Vineyard, Davis, Okla., 664; 20. Brayden Wyatt, Wichita Falls, Texas, 660.Mach-1 Sport Compacts – 1. Bubba Brown Jr., Jackson, Minn., 1,124; 2. Oliver Monson, Clear Lake, Iowa, 1,064; 3. Howard Watson, Weatherford, Texas, 1,051; 4. Julia Childs, Weatherford, Texas, 1,050; 5. Dustin Virkus, Clarkfield, Minn., 1,039; 6. Ramsey Meyer, Pierce, Neb., 1,021; 7. Scott Newbury, Rhome, Texas, 1,015; 8. Andrew Harris, South Sioux City, Neb., 1,011; 9. Curtis Miller, Lewis, Iowa, and Alex Dostal, Glencoe, Minn., both 1,008; 11. Jay DeVries, Spencer, Iowa, 986; 12. Barry Taft, Argyle, Iowa, 981; 13. Shawn Hein, Beatrice, Neb., 977; 14. Kaytee DeVries, Spencer, Iowa, 934; 15. Terry Tritt, York, Neb., 808; 16. Jeff Klinkefus, Golden, Colo., 774; 17. Brian Bagent, Killeen, Texas, 772; 18. Clifton Whisenant, Proctor, Texas, 771; 19. John Martinez, Beatrice, Neb., 764; 20. Harold Clifton, Stephenville, Texas, 758.last_img read more

Felix Pena, Ryan Yarbrough show pitching in bulk can be a winner

first_imgYarbrough is glad to be part of the organization that was first out of the gate.”Like we saw last year, everyone was like, ‘This is ridiculous, outrageous,’ and then obviously you see a lot of teams starting to use it this year because they see how successful it has been, so, just kind of being in the forefront of all that is really great,” he told SN. “They’re just trying to put us in great position to win ballgames, and that’s really all you can ask for from a front office.”This article has been updated with quotes from Ryan Yarbrough, who spoke with SN’s Joe Rivera at Yankee Stadium. Felix Pena typically leaves the game in the middle innings when he pitches, but Friday was not a typical night.First, the memory of Pena’s late Angels teammate Tyler Skaggs was pushing him to succeed; second, he was pitching hitless ball, and the pitcher who preceded him, Taylor Cole, had done the same.  After Pena’s fourth inning of work — the top of the sixth — a no-hitter watch was on. Would LA manager Brad Ausmus decide that Pena had done enough and then turn the game over to his late-inning relief crew? MORE: Watch ‘ChangeUp,’ a new MLB live whiparound show on DAZNAusums decided to go old-school — as old-school as a combined no-no can be, anyway. He kept sending Pena to the mound, and Pena kept working hitless frames. Ausmus gave Pena the ninth.On his 81st pitch of the game, Pena retired the Mariners’ Mallex Smith on a grounder to second. The combined no-hitter was complete. So was the greatest opener game in the year-plus history of the strategy. Cole and Pena’s reign almost ended two days later.Sunday in Baltimore, Rays left-hander Ryan Yarbrough was three outs away from finishing the first combined perfect game in baseball history. His regular tag-team partner, Ryne Stanek, set the stage by retiring the first six Orioles batters. Like Pena, Yarbrough was in his seventh inning of work. Unlike Pena, he could not finish. He allowed hits to the first two hitters in the ninth and left one batter later. Tampa Bay couldn’t preserve the shutout, either, as the O’s pushed across a run.The Rays will take the eventual 4-1 victory just the same, and though they failed to make history, they did draw more attention to the strategy they introduced last year and that other teams are adopting — slowly — this year.♦♦♦The opener attracts heat from players, pundits and fans who believe that giving the ball to a horse who can work into the late innings is still a better plan. Those critics probably dismiss the idea that the pitcher who follows the opener can also get the game to the setup man and closer, or, in Pena’s case last weekend, finish the job.Pena had several factors working in his favor Friday night: He was given a big lead early and he was throwing too well, in Ausmus’ estimation, to be lifted. His seven innings pitched tied a season high. Still, Pena has worked into the seventh or later five times in 13 bulk outings.Yarbrough definitely knows how to pitch in bulk. He threw 6 1/3 innings of one-run ball in the first opener game, May 19, 2018, in Anaheim, and he has combined with Rays openers to go seven or more innings in eight of his 25 career bulk appearances. He had not worked into the ninth until Sunday, but with a perfecto on the line and with his pitch count modest (76 through six), Rays skipper Kevin Cash stuck with him.Those performances are on the extreme high end for opener games, though. On average, opener-bulk tandems max out around the sixth inning, just as today’s regular starters do. SN has indentified 99 opener-bulk games, or 3.5 percent of all MLB game starts, this season through July 15. The chart below shows just how closely the tandems’ stats track with the average results of the other 96.5 percent of game starts.STATOP+BULKAVG SPIP/game5.555.42BF/game23.6123.10ERA4.414.47WHIP1.3111.308K/97.938.50League average begins to look really good when a team — the Angels, say — doesn’t have enough quality starting pitching. LA used an opener-bulk tandem 18 times through July 14, about the same number of turns as a mid-rotation starter. The comparison to the team’s non-opener starters is striking: STATOP+BULKLAA SPIP/game5.834.97BF/game24.2221.51ERA4.715.46WHIP1.1811.356K/99.008.56The Rays, on the other hand, have been excellent in both settings this year. Their tandems put together a 2.42 ERA and 1.06 WHIP in an MLB-most 29 games (5.51 innings per game) through July 15, while the traditional starters had a 3.09 ERA and a 1.04 WHIP in 67 games (5.79 innings per game).♦♦♦The Angels moved Pena into a bulk role in April after he made four starts to begin the season. Even though Friday was unusual for many reasons, it was also a typical night, for these reasons:— He began with a clean inning after replacing Cole. Pena has not entered a game mid-inning as a bulk reliever.— His first batter was the Mariners’ No. 7 hitter, Tom Murphy, rather than the leadoff man, Smith. Pena has faced the No. 5 hitter or lower first in 10 of his 13 bulk outings; the other three appearances began with the No. 4 hitter. — He faced 22 batters in all, just two over his season average as a bulk reliever. The only batting order spots he faced a third time were seventh, eighth, ninth and first.Those last two points go to the heart of what teams try to do with bulk relievers: keep them away from the top of the order in the first inning, when the most runs historically are scored, and the third time through, when slash-line averages spike.MORE: White Sox will limit Dylan Cease, who plans to become a workhorseIt seems clear from the numbers that the Angels are most interested in giving Pena an easier “start” by having him follow an opener. He has a career 6.00 first-inning ERA and .815 first-inning opponents’ OPS; only his ninth innings (7.41 ERA, .936 OPS) have been worse. His third-time-through numbers as a starter are excellent (.580 OPS in 81 plate appearances).The Rays, as originators of the opener strategy, are more nuanced in using Yarbrough and their other primary bulk relievers, Jalen Beeks and Yonny Chirinos.— They set up Yarbrough, a left-hander who doesn’t throw hard, to follow the flamethrowing right-hander Stanek.— Yarbrough can enter the game anywhere from the first to the third, depending on matchups, and Cash will hook him quickly if necessary. As evidence, Yarbrough’s bulk innings this year range from two to 6 1/3.— Yarbrough has faced batters a third time in just two outings, and for only eight batters total. He faced 21 hitters Sunday, well above his 14.6 season average for bulk games. In contrast, he’s averaging seven innings and 27.75 hitters in his four starts.Yarbrough’s focus, naturally, is just on getting outs. “It’s basically the exact the same,” he told SN on Tuesday of bulk relieving and starting. “The only difference is I’m coming in in the second or third inning; that’s the only difference. I’m throwing bullpens in between, just like a starter would. I’m coming to the field later, like a starter would. It’s just a matter of coming in later in the game, not starting the game.”♦♦♦There is one other similarity between Pena and Yarbrough, and they share it with the bulk of this year’s bulk relievers: They don’t have a lot of major league service time. Pena was at one year, 79 days coming into the season, while Yarbrough accrued a full season as a rookie last year.Of the 36 bulk relievers who pitched in games through July 15, 30 had less than three years’ service time prior to 2019. The exceptions: Edwin Jackson, Wade LeBlanc, Tommy Milone, Drew Smyly and Angels hurlers Trevor Cahill and Nick Tropeano.Using less-experienced (and mostly less-hyped) pitchers increases the likelihood of buy-in into this innovative plan. Stanek (one year, 38 days prior to 2019) told reporters last year that he’d rather be opening in the majors than pitching in Triple-A. There’s also a monetary benefit to teams that go that route. Pitchers working in these roles don’t get to accumulate large counting numbers other than wins (Yarbrough had 16 last year as a swingman), and wins are supposedly passe among the fancy-stats folks who are running clubs. Those pitchers won’t, in theory, be able to make strong cases when they reach salary arbitration.♦♦♦Sixteen MLB teams, more than half the 30 clubs, used an opener through July 15, per SN’s research. They’ve treated opener games mostly as tandem starts rather than as advancements in bullpenning. Four teams — the Rays, Angels, Mariners and Yankees — accounted for more than two-thirds of all opener games (67 total).That’s why it was said at the beginning of this article that the strategy is catching on slowly, but maybe teams should speed things up. Those four clubs are a combined 42-25 (.627 winning percentage) when an opener goes — and when a bulk reliever follows.last_img read more