AFC extends condolences to City Councillor’s family

first_imgThe Alliance For Change (AFC) has extended its condolences to the family and colleagues of the late Councillor Junior Garrett.The party has particularly extended its deepest condolences to the A Partnership for National Unity (APNU) and the People’s National Congress (PNC) whom Garrett represented at the Georgetown municipal council.In a statement released on Sunday, the party noted that it stood in solidarity with its coalition political colleagues at this difficult time of mourning. The AFC also praised the contributions of Councillor Garrett and his professional work as a respected accountant.Councillor Garrett on Friday last collapsed and died at his place of business located at Urquhart Street, Georgetown. He had just returned from a meeting with fellow council members. The 64-year-old man was heralded for his professionalism and skill; he leaves to mourn seven children.last_img read more

Palmdale’s much-anticipated water park splashing to life

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2DryTown’s three water slides are named Rattler’s Revenge, The Wildcatter and Devil’s Punchbowl – the last of which lasts more than a minute, with riders swirling around a giant blue basin before plunging down the drain. Visitors can also float in inner tubes on the slow-moving current of a “river” called Big Rock River. The Little Miners Camp, for youngsters under age 12, has a rope bridge, slides and stairs standing in a foot of water and continually doused by fountains. Moms and dads can watch from lounge chairs under more than 50 umbrellas and shades set up around the park. A grill sells hamburgers, chicken and deli sandwiches, and an arcade has electronic games. Starting Saturday, the water park will be open 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. daily through Labor Day. From 6 to 9 p.m., the park will be available for rent – starting at $3,000 plus food – by businesses or organizations. PALMDALE – Three 35-foot-tall waterslides, a 925-foot-long “river,” nearly 2,000 innertubes and rafts, and a playground standing in a foot of water go to work this weekend keeping Palmdale residents cool. The city’s $15.4 million DryTown Water Park opens Saturday, after a month of training some 110 staffers and lifeguards, mostly college and high school students, and one summer later than originally hoped because of construction delays from 2005 storms. “People are always at the gate looking in: `When are you going to open?”‘ recreation supervisor Pete Casey said Tuesday, as the park was opened to local news media. “There seems to be lots of interest. There was a lot of positive feedback from folks on the weekend during our training.” The western-themed water park is in the 33-acre Oasis Park, on Avenue S at 40th Street East, one of two “superparks” financed with a special tax that Palmdale property owners approved in 2002. The other was an expanded Marie Kerr Park, which gained a swimming pool and an amphitheater. The water park has room for 3,000. About 1,000 season passes have been sold so far. Daily admission for patrons ages 9 and older will be $12 for Palmdale residents, $15 for nonresidents. Tickets for Palmdale children ages 3 to 8 cost $7, or $10 for nonresidents. Palmdale seniors age 62 or older pay $7, or $10 for nonresidents. Military personnel tickets cost $10, for both resident and nonresidents. Season passes cost $53 for Palmdale residents, $64 for nonresidents. A Family Pack of four season passes costs $180 for Palmdale residents, $218 for nonresidents; passes for additional family members are $50 for residents, $60 for nonresidents. The $27.5 million Oasis Park opened its recreation center in October, with the 25-yard by 25-meter swimming pool opening to the public this weekend. The 16,800-square-foot recreation center contains a gymnasium big enough for a regulation basketball court or two smaller courts, a dance and fitness studio with wood flooring, a youth game area, a lounge, a kitchen and a multipurpose hall that can be divided into three separate rooms. Operating the water park is expected to cost about $1 million per summer, city officials said. Officials hope to attract 125,000 visitors a summer and to have admission fees cover the costs. chuck.bostwick@dailynews.com (661) 267-5742160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img