This Is Our Youth, Starring Michael Cera, is Broadway Bound

first_img Originally produced off-Broadway by The New Group, This Is Our Youth opened at the INTAR Theatre in October 1996. The play later opened at the Douglas Fairbanks Theatre in November 1998, starring Mark Ruffalo, Josh Hamilton and Missy Yager. The 2002 West End production of This Is Our Youth starred Hayden Christensen, Jake Gyllenhaal and Anna Paquin. Other actors to subsequently appear in the London version include Matt Damon, Casey Affleck, Summer Phoenix and Culkin. View Comments All three castmembers will be making their Broadway debuts. Cera and Culkin appeared in a different Australian production of This Is Our Youth in 2012. Cera’s screen credits include Arrested Development and Superbad, Culkin’s credits include Igby Goes Down and Gevinson, the 17-year-old brains behind fashion website Rookie, will be making her stage debut. Related Shows This Is Our Youth chronicles 48 hours in the lives of spoiled, drugged-out, rich kids living in Manhattan in the 1980s. Cera will play Warren, a depressed 19-year-old who has stolen $15,000 from his tycoon Dad, while Culkin will play his drug-dealer friend Dennis and Gevinson will appear as Jessica, a perceptive fashion student. The production will feature original music by Grammy winner Rostam Batmanglij and be staged in-the-round in Chicago, before being restaged for a proscenium theater on Broadway.center_img Kenneth Lonergan’s This Is Our Youth is Broadway bound, starring Michael Cera, Kieran Culkin and Tavi Gevinson. According to the Chicago Tribune, the show, directed by Anna D. Shapiro, will play at the Steppenwolf Upstairs Theatre in Chicago June 10 through June 27, with opening night set for June 18. The production will then transfer to Broadway’s Cort Theatre, with previews starting on August 18 and opening night scheduled for September 11. This Is Our Youth Show Closed This production ended its run on Jan. 4, 2015last_img read more

Syracuse men’s rugby off to best start in past 3 years

first_imgSyracuse club rugby is comprised of players from 10 countries, most of which come from different backgrounds — like junior Khang Tran.Tran moved from Vietnam to France with aspirations of being a chef, only to be told by his parents that he couldn’t make a career out of cooking. While studying in France, Tran found the sport of rugby. Tran carried the game with him to Syracuse, where it has tied him in with other players from varying backgrounds.With a team comprised of players from Australia, Bangladesh, England, France, Hong Kong, Spain, South Africa, the United States, and Wales, the sport serves as a link. This year, strong team cohesion has Syracuse men’s rugby 4-1 on the season and atop their league with three matches remaining.“This club is easily the tightest team I’ve been apart,” said sophomore Dillon Wall. “We’re all really good friends and we love to go out and play [the sport] with each other.”Head coach Rob Wilson, who has been with the program since its founding in 1969, admitted that it can be a challenge coaching such a diverse team because of the various styles of play and background experiences. Wilson tries to make the transition as seamless as possible.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“We are fairly consistent with our techniques,” Wilson said. “We focus a lot on basic techniques, so I don’t think it’s that difficult for a diverse group of players to understand what we’re trying to do as a team.”Susie Teuscher | Digital Design EditorAt practice, the players start with a game of touch, rugby’s equivalent of two-hand touch football. Assistant coach Dave DeSalvia says that touch is a nice way for the guys to warm up and have fun before their stretching exercises. Those exercises set the tone for the rest of practice. Captain Dallas Haskins, who played rugby for the under-20 national team in Hong Kong, urges his teammates to be precise with each exercise.The stretches are followed by a 4 on 4 game of toss. This drill is a condensed version of the game that allows players to focus on the complexity of the pass-catch situation. Though it appears simple, Wilson explains that it is crucial to success.Wilson breaks the drill down into three essential components: communication, alignment and awareness. Communication lets the passer know the direction and distance of their intended target. If the player is in proper alignment, it allows the passer to focus on the positioning of the defenders and make the best play.“All of it needs to get taken care of because the game gets pretty fast and furious,” Wilson said, “and if you don’t have all those details taken care of then you’re going to be losing possession. Giving the ball to the opposition isn’t a good strategy in most sports.”Wilson and SU have finished .500 or higher in each of the last five seasons. Prior to last year, Syracuse finished in the top two in consecutive seasons. Wilson attributed the 3rd place finish to a lot of inexperience paired with a lack of depth.Now a year older, the Hammerheads cite energy and cohesiveness as the driving forces behind their strong start. Wall, a sophomore scrum half from San Francisco, enjoys the camaraderie most.“The type of energy that you bring can’t be taught,” Haskins said. “And that’s really what’s driving the energy and focus that this team brings into games.” Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 9, 2018 at 10:19 pm Contact Tim: tnolan@syr.educenter_img Commentslast_img read more

Clippers coach Doc Rivers saw three key components in rout of Lakers

first_imgGood ball movement, proper spacing and defense. All were on display for the Clippers in their 114-89 rout of the Lakers on Wednesday night at Staples Center.Clippers coach Doc Rivers took notice.“The ball movement was fantastic,” said Rivers, whose team will play host to the Dallas Mavericks at 12:30 p.m. Saturday. “The opponent does not matter; you need to make shots. We had great spacing and ball movement.“We need that every night, but it was beautiful to watch. Our defensive intensity was also very high, and that is good to see.” Lakers coach Byron Scott before the game reiterated what he’s been saying since he took over the helm this season, that this is not yet a rivalry and that Los Angeles is still a “purple and gold” town.Rivers believes these games against each other do carry some kind of special meaning.“Both teams can say this game did not mean anything,” Rivers said. “Yes, it does not mean anything in the big scope of everything, but when you play people you know, those games are fun.“You always want to beat the guys that you will see all of the time. You could see the energy in the building.”No question, the Clippers were pumped. Part of it might have been because they were ticked at losing to the Atlanta Hawks on Monday. Part of it might have been the long-lasting effects of last season’s opening-night loss to the Lakers, Griffin suggested.“Last year, we still had a pretty bad taste in our mouth from losing that first game on opening night,” he said. “There has to be a little bit of pride, but at the same time, I don’t think we do anything different to get ready for this game than we do for any other game.”Matt Barnes, who scored 19 points and played solid defense on Kobe Bryant — Bryant scored just four points on 2-of-12 shooting — chimed in on the so-called rivalry games against the Lakers.“I think that any time — throwing their record out — (a game against the Lakers) is going to be good,” said Barnes, whose team has won nine of the past 10 against the Lakers dating to Nov. 2, 2012. “They are going to play a little better than they normally play, we are going to play a little better than we normally play.“The crowd is electric. The (blowout victory) is just what’s been happening lately.”After losing 116-103 on opening night of 2013-14, the Clippers beat the Lakers 123-87, 142-94 and 120-97 before winning 118-111 in the second game of this season.This and thatShooting guard Monta Ellis is leading Dallas in scoring with a 20.5 average and power forward Dirk Nowitzki is averaging 18.4 points and 5.9 rebounds. … The Mavericks are shooting 47.6 percent from the field, second in the NBA. The Clippers are fourth at 47.2 percent. … Clippers center DeAndre Jordan is leading the league in rebounding (13.6 average) and field-goal percentage (71.0).BREAKOUTAfter Saturday’s game against Dallas, the Clippers will host Miami (15-20) on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. Blake Griffin, who led the team with 27 points, said the team’s mind-set going into the game was all of the above.“Obviously, you have to execute,” Griffin said. “But that was what we talked about in shootaround and pregame amongst the players. I thought we came out and did everything we wanted to do.”With all that said, Griffin seemed happiest the Clippers did not let up on the Lakers. Lack of a killer instinct has been one of the team’s issues.“We said at halftime that we have to keep (pushing) the pedal, keep going and come out with energy and focus,” Griffin said. “We did just that.”Beating Lakers means somethingcenter_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Don Cherry fired from longtime ‘Hockey Night in Canada’ role following immigrant comments

first_imgDon Cherry has been fired by Sportsnet and will no longer appear on “Coach’s Corner” during “Hockey Night in Canada.””Sports brings people together — it unites us, not divides us. Following further discussions with Don Cherry after Saturday night’s broadcast, it has been decided it is the right time for him to immediately step down,” Sportsnet president Bart Yabsley said in a statement Monday afternoon. Statement from Sportsnet: pic.twitter.com/LRKrww0AQ1— Sportsnet PR (@SportsnetPR) November 11, 2019The decision came less than 48 hours after Cherry made insensitive comments about Canada’s immigrants when discussing poppies, the official symbol of remembrance for Canadian veterans and those who served during times of war. “You people love, they come here, whatever it is, you love our way of life, you love our milk and honey. The least you could pay [is] a couple of bucks for a poppy or something like that,” Cherry said on Saturday night. “These guys pay for your way of life that you enjoy in Canada. These guys pay the biggest price.”Sportsnet released a statement on Sunday, saying: “Don’s discriminatory comments are offensive and they do not represent our values and what we stand for as a network. We have spoken with Don about the severity of this issue and we sincerely apologize for these divisive remarks.”Later that night, Cherry’s longtime partner Ron MacLean issued an on-air apology for not condemning him during the segment.”Don Cherry made remarks which were hurtful, discriminatory, which were flat out wrong,” MacLean said. “We at Sportsnet have apologized. It certainly doesn’t stand for what Sportsnet or Rogers [Communications] represents. We know diversity is the strength of the country. We see it in travels with our show and with Hockey Night in Canada. I owe you an apology, too: that’s the big thing I want to emphasize. I sat there, did not catch it, did not respond.”Cherry responded to news of his firing in an interview with the Toronto Sun. He said he had “no problem” with Sportsnet’s decision, but refused to apologize for his remarks.“I know what I said and I meant it. Everybody in Canada should wear a poppy to honour our fallen soldiers,” Cherry said, via the Sun. “I speak the truth and I walk the walk. I have visited the bases of the troops, been to Afghanistan with our brave soldiers at Christmas, been to cemeteries of our fallen around the world and honoured our fallen troops on Coach’s Corner.”“To keep my job, I cannot be turned into a tamed robot,” Cherry added.Earlier Monday, the hashtag, #DonCherryIsRight was trending in Canada. NHL:“While we recognize Cherry’s 4 decades of service broadcasting NHL games, today’s decision was justifiable response to his comments on Saturday night. Opinions he expressed are in direct conflict with values of diversity/inclusion that we embrace as pillars of our sport”— Devin Heroux (@Devin_Heroux) November 11, 2019The firing ends a long-twisted road for the 85-year-old former NHL player and coach who became a polarizing figure in Canada for his controversial remarks for years, aimed at, among other things, European and French-Canadian players, women in the sports industry and the physicality of the sport.A week ago, Cherry laughed when discussing Scott Sabourin’s injury that left the Ottawa Senator forward hospitalized.Sportsnet has not said how or if it will replace Cherry’s “Coach’s Corner” segment moving forward.last_img read more