U.S. Utility Execs Concede Need for More Innovation (or Better Messaging)

first_imgU.S. Utility Execs Concede Need for More Innovation (or Better Messaging) FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Glen Boshart for SNL:Top officials with the Edison Electric Institute wrapped up the group’s annual convention June 15 in Chicago by discussing what they must do to prosper in a rapidly changing industry environment.Tom Fanning, EEI’s newly elected chairman who also serves as chairman, president & CEO of Southern Co.: “We are innovative, we are in the customer interest, we are constantly looking for ways to create the future,” Fanning maintained, suggesting that the problem has been more one of messaging.Christopher Crane, president and CEO of Exelon Corp. and EEI vice chairman sees storage as something utilities need to embrace by working with the labs and universities “to help advance that along.”But the officials acknowledged that the traditional utility culture may be holding them back. Patricia Vincent-Collawn, chairman, president & CEO of PNM Resources Inc. and EEI vice chairman, stressed the need for utilities to hire people from the younger generation who are more adept at using new technologies in innovative ways.“You have to walk the talk, you have to bring in people from the outside, you have to protect them from the internal immune system of the utility” that wants to quickly “kill off anything that’s different,” Vincent-Collawn said.Picking up on that theme, Fanning noted that the culture and employees at his company can be represented by a pie chart, only a tiny slice of which is composed of “the revolutionaries, the creative disruptors.”“The people in the big pie slice want to murder the people in the little pie slice,” Fanning acknowledged. Thus, he said companies need to keep from living on their past successes and instead embrace innovation and new technology.Full article ($): EI officials debate how to keep up with rapidly changing timeslast_img read more

Rock Glossary

first_imgLearn these common climbing terms and you just might avoid an embarrassing situation if you’re asked to “flash.”AreteAn outside corner on a rock face, like corners of a pyramid.ButtressA rock formation that projects out from the main face or cliff.ChimneyA wide crack usually big enough to fit the climber’s entire body inside.CruxThe most difficult portion of a climb. Usually, the crux is a single move or a short sequence of moves.DihedralWhere two walls meet to form an inside corner.FlashTo successfully send a route the first time without practicing itLeadingSending a sport or trad route first, either placing protection as you go or clipping in to existing bolts. The level of risk is higher when leading, as you’re not automatically anchored to the rock.PitchThe distance climbed with one length of rope. Climbs can be single-pitch or multi-pitch. Table Rock, N.C. is famous for its multi-pitch routes (600 feet long), whereas Sunset Rock, Tenn., is known for its single-pitch routes (less than 80 feet).ProblemA bouldering term, meaning the path the climber takes to complete the climb. A bouldering problem is the equivalent of a climbing route.SendTo successfully complete, or “ascend,” a route.last_img read more

Russia aims to produce ‘millions’ of virus doses by 2021

first_imgRussia said Monday it aims to launch mass production of a coronavirus vaccine next month and turn out “several million” doses per month by next year.The country is pushing ahead with several vaccine prototypes and one prepared at the Gamaleya institute in Moscow has reached advanced stages of development.”We are very much counting on starting mass production in September,” industry minister Denis Manturov said in an interview published by TASS news agency. Gamaleya’s vaccine employs the adenovirus, a similar technology to the coronavirus vaccine prototype developed by China’s CanSino, currently in the advanced stage of clinical trials.The Gamaleya institute came under fire after researchers and directors injected themselves with the prototype months ago, with specialists criticizing the move as an unorthodox and rushed way of starting human trials. Scientists have told AFP that Russia will struggle to adapt the vaccine to mass production because the country lacks raw materials, adequate facilities and experience, particularly with advanced technology like viral vector.Some Russian officials have boasted that the country will be the first to come up with the vaccine, even comparing it to the space race to produce the first satellite in the Soviet era.Moscow has dismissed allegations from the UK, the United States and Canada that a hacking group linked to Russian intelligence services tried to steal information about a coronavirus vaccine from labs in the West.Russia’s coronavirus caseload is currently fourth in the world after the United States, Brazil and India. “We will be able to ensure production volumes of several hundred thousand a month, with an eventual increase to several million by the start of next year,” he said, adding that one developer is preparing production technology at three locations in central Russia.Health Minister Mikhail Murashko on Saturday said the Gamaleya vaccine had “completed clinical trials” and that documents were being prepared to register it with the state.Another vaccine, developed by Siberia-based Vektor lab, is currently undergoing clinical trials and two more will begin human testing within the next two months, Murashko said.Gamaleya’s vaccine is a so-called viral vector vaccine, meaning it employs another virus to carry the DNA encoding of the needed immune response into cells.center_img Topics :last_img read more