Gov. Wolf: Pennsylvania Reduced Prison Population by Record-Setting 3,471 since March 1

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 22, 2020 Criminal Justice Reform,  Press Release,  Prison Reform Governor Tom Wolf announced today that since March 1, the population of those in state correctional facilities has been reduced by 3,471 individuals, the largest multiple-month decrease ever experienced by the Department of Corrections and one that likely helped the department reduce the number of COVID-19 cases in facilities.“When COVID-19 arrived, the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections met the challenge of keeping the general public safe while protecting its inmate population from this easily transmissible disease,” Gov. Wolf said. “The department has been successful at keeping COVID-19 from spreading widely in the congregate settings of correctional facilities.”In the three-plus months since COVID-19 was first identified in Pennsylvania, less than 1 percent of the state prison population has tested positive. Ultimately, the inmates inside state correctional institutions have proven so far to be more secure from COVID-19 than the general population, where the mortality rate is 90% higher than it is in the state’s correctional facilities as of today.The population reduction includes furloughing paroled individuals from centers to home plans; working with the parole board to maximize parole releases; reviewing parole detainers for those in county jails and state prisons; expediting the release process for anyone with a pending approved home plan; reviewing and releasing inmates who are beyond their minimum sentences; and implementing the temporary reprieve program that has allowed Gov. Wolf to issue reprieves to 159 inmates during the pandemic.These releases are in addition to preexisting criminal justice reform efforts that have reduced Pennsylvania’s prison population from 48,881 inmates when Gov. Wolf entered office at the beginning of January 2015 to 41,738 inmates today. That 7,143 decrease in population in under five years has allowed the state to reduce taxpayer costs by closing facilities while enabling more Pennsylvanians to resume their lives – all without an increase in the state’s crime rate.“The Department of Corrections takes pride in its ability to keep inmates safe and will continue to prioritize health and wellness during the COVID-19 crisis,” DOC Sec. John Wetzel said. “We will continue to seek improvements in our criminal justice system that minimizes the number of incarcerated individuals while providing the highest degree of safety to every Pennsylvanian.”Pennsylvania has taken a bipartisan approach to criminal justice reform and in recent years has:Passed Justice Reinvestment 2 addressing the high cost of incarceration in the state, strengthening support for county probation programs and fixing inadequate sentencing guidelines, and reforming the post-trial criminal justice system.Created a Fair-Chance hiring policy for state agencies that removes the criminal conviction question, otherwise known as “banning the box,” from non-civil service employment applications for agencies under the governor’s jurisdiction.Signed the “Clean Slate” bill, the first of its kind in the nation, to help those who have committed low-level offenses and have paid their penalty get back on the path to a blemish-free record, removing potential roadblocks to jobs, housing, health care, and education.Signed Act 95 of 2018, eliminating driver’s license suspensions for non-driving infractions.Signed Act 146 of 2018, extending the time a convicted individual has to file a post-conviction relief action to one year, from what was 60 days under current law.Signed Act 147 of 2018, updating Pennsylvania’s DNA testing law to reflect significant advances in technology and the lessons learned by criminal justice professionals since 2002. The legislation removes the supervision requirement that only people serving a sentence can apply for DNA testing.Signed Act 148 of 2018, a victim protection bill regarding housing options and emergency transfers.Find more information on Pennsylvania’s response to COVID-19.Find more information on Gov. Wolf’s Process to Reopen PA.Ver esta página en español.center_img Gov. Wolf: Pennsylvania Reduced Prison Population by Record-Setting 3,471 since March 1last_img read more

Chelsea and Liverpool both chasing Ivorian star – report

first_imgChelsea and Liverpool both want Vitesse Arnhem’s Ivorian striker Wilfried Bony, according to The Sun.The player’ agent claims Liverpool have made an approach and there is a 50% chance that Bony – dubbed the new Didier Drogba – will be on the move in January.Meanwhile, Manchester City are keeping a close eye on Raheem Sterling’s contract negotiations at Liverpool, according to the Daily Mail.It is claimed the Harlesden teenager’s advisers, who say he has not actually been made a concrete offer, are becoming increasingly irritated with Anfield boss Brendan Rodgers and feel he is trying to railroad Sterling into signing a new deal.City are said to be monitoring the situation and apparently could consider launching a bid in January if his future is not resolved by then.The Daily Mirror have a similar story, saying ­the Sterling camp were amazed when Rodgers declared that the player should sign a new contract in what could be seen as an attempt to bully him into agreeing terms.And The Sun quote a source as saying: “How can Raheem hurry and sign when there isn’t anything to sign?”This page is regularly updated.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 Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Is Our World Natural?

first_imgAt first glance, the headline sounds absurd: is our world natural?  Of course the world is natural.  Nature is natural, isn’t it?  Often, though, we picture what humans do as unnatural – oil spills, landfills, pollution, nuclear waste, crime, war.  But if humans are a part of nature, then whatever they do is natural.  Some recent articles show that the definition of natural requires some reflection.Gulf oil spill:  The gulf oil spill, the worst environmental disaster the United States has ever faced, is finally in the cleanup stages.  To consider the impact on wildlife, jobs, and the economy is heart wrenching.  Who could not be moved by those news photos of pelicans drenched in oil, black goo infesting delicate wetlands, tarballs on white beaches?  It seems so unnatural.  Images of man-made machinery, complicated drill rigs and capping devices add to the contrast between natural and unnatural.  Few seem to be commenting on the fact that the oil is coming out of the earth.  If the earth is natural, any substance it exudes must also be natural.  “Natural” oil seeps have leaked crude into the gulf long before man decided to tap into the subsurface reservoirs (see BBC News, “Seepages near the leaking BP oil well ‘may be natural’”).  What’s more, bacteria are expected to break down the oil over time, and bacteria are natural.  Defining unnatural in this instance, therefore, needs to include situations of natural substances undergoing possibly unnatural processes, or concentrating in unnatural amounts where they are not usually found.  But if unnatural includes those situations, it also includes numerous unusual concentrations of natural substances (lava, radioactive elements, smoke, algal blooms) that had nothing to do with man’s intervention.Forest fires:  Fire season is coming to the western United States again.  One can only hope that the devastation of last year’s record fires will not be repeated.  For many years, the public learned from Smokey Bear that “Only you can prevent forest fires.”  Fire lookout towers were installed in vulnerable areas, and any puff of smoke in a national park or wilderness area set off a monumental effort at fire suppression, even if no structures were threatened– smoke jumpers dropped into the burn zone, water-dropping aircraft dropping water and flame retardant, firebreaks quickly carved through the wilderness.    A paradigm change occurred in the 1970s, however, as more park superintendents and ecologists considered the role of “natural” wildfires to the health of the forest.  Botanists realized many forest trees and herbaceous plants actually rely on fire for their propagation.  Fires began to be incorporated as a normal, “natural” part of the forest life cycle.  Parks adopted a “let burn” policy for wildfires set by lightning, even if the smoke drifted into Yosemite Valley and set the tourists coughing.  Only fires that threatened buildings were suppressed.    The 1988 Yellowstone fires, though, set by a backpacker’s campfire, set the ecologists talking about canopy fires – those exceptionally hot fires that burned not only the undergrowth but the tops of the trees, leaving a whole area devastated, unable to sustain wildlife and unable to restrict the damage of erosion.  Now, it seemed a new dividing line was being erected between natural and unnatural.  It’s doubtful, however, that the 1988 catastrophe was the first one.  How many were set in past centuries by lightning in exceptionally dry, hot years?  Perhaps the 1988 fire could be called unnatural because it was human caused.  But again, if humans are part of nature, like any other mammal, anything they do could arguably called natural.    Maybe a distinction could be drawn between human-caused fires that are intentional instead of accidental.  Arson fires have caused untold grief and loss, especially in Southern California where each year most of the worst brush fires are set by arsonists.  If anything seems unnatural, arson would surely qualify; but then is the firefighters’ response to be considered natural?  Perhaps self-preservation is natural, but self-destruction is unnatural.  PhysOrg says that prevention of human-caused wildfires pays big dividends.  Which action is natural, and which is not?    According to evolutionists, human ancestors first learned to use fire 800,000 years ago, and some of our ancestors set wildfires for hunting or warfare.  Such wildfires may have caused the extinction of other species.  At what point did hominid activities cross an imaginary line between natural behavior and unnatural behavior?Global warming:  One would have to be a Rip Van Winkle to miss all the talk about human-caused climate change.  Every week we are hearing about current and future threats to the planet if global warming is not mitigated: for instance, National Geographic warns that 2010 may be the hottest on record; PhysOrg says global warming will cause more smog in Los Angeles; Science Daily says climate change is making marmots fatter; and another National Geographic article claims that global warming will increase Mexican immigration.  The debate centers over what is natural climate change and what is unnatural—i.e., man-caused.  Nature announced on June 4 that not all of a glacier’s wane may be human-caused, but may be due to “natural climate variability.”  But if man is a part of nature, such distinctions are academic.Natural disasters:  TV programs about natural disasters always grab attention.  Every year the news fills our homes with images of tsunamis, earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, floods, and other tragedies.  PhysOrg discussed ways a scientist at Tel Aviv University is seeking to avoid the train wrecks caused by such events.  “Thousands of people around the world have died in train wrecks caused by natural disasters,” the article began; “In 2004, the tsunami in Southeast Asia derailed a Sri Lankan train, killing 1,700 people.”  That event pales in comparison to the 230,000 people who perished in the Haiti earthquake last January.    We call them natural disasters, but something in us cries out that things should not be this way; they seem somehow unnatural.  Unnatural in this sense might refer to events falling outside an expected or usual range.  We can’t blame humans for these events, except to the point where they failed to plan ahead, such as building a house on the sand instead of on a rock.  The death toll in Haiti might have been far less if people had not built unreinforced houses on slopes; but it would not have been zero.  And if a large meteor from space were to land on Manhattan, no amount of prevention would avoid monumental loss of life from that kind of “natural” disaster.    As long as one avoids natural disasters, spending time in “nature” is good for human health, announced PhysOrg.  A doctor in Finland said that most people “feel relaxed and good when they are out in nature.  But not many of us know that there is also scientific evidence about the healing effects of nature.”  But if humans are part of nature, aren’t they out in nature all the time?  He was thinking of forests and green settings, obviously, in contrast to being stuck in a cubicle or traffic jam.  But it might be healthier to be in a high-rise building than a forest when a natural disaster like a wildfire, lightning storm or flash flood strikes.    We often hear about man’s devastation of the Amazon rain forests.  But “nature” can pack a lot of devastation on its own.  This month, Nature News talked about a “once-in-a century drought” that struck the Amazon in 2005, reducing rainfall by 60-75% in some areas.  But that same year, according to Live Science, a storm ripped through the rain forest, toppling half a billion trees without the help of human chainsaws.  In some hard-hit areas, 80% of the trees were killed by the storm.These and other examples show that defining natural is complex and problematic.  Yet the word is important in origins debates.  Evolutionists, whether atheistic or theistic, often demand that science restrict its explanations to natural phenomena subject to natural laws.  Yet by using their human reason and intellect, they are, in a sense, acting “outside” nature by casting judgment on what nature entails and how it is to be understood.  Explanation by its very “nature” is not a natural phenomenon subject to natural laws.  And why is it that human beings are the only intelligent creatures on the planet thinking about these questions?    It shouldn’t be surprising, therefore, that this article began with a headline, “Is our world natural?”  Sean Carroll, a Caltech cosmologist, asked that question of the whole universe (see 05/11/2006).Materialists can’t have it both ways.  They cannot argue that only particles and natural laws exist, then turn around and blame humans for global warming, pollution, war, acid rain, extinction, or anything else.  Nature is what nature does.  If humans are a part of nature, whatever they do is only natural.  It’s doubtful that even Richard Dawkins could stomach calling his worst political nightmare, whatever he would pick (creationism? religion? Margaret Thatcher?) “natural.”  It’s also doubtful he would want the arguments in his books discounted as mere particles responding to natural laws.    The only perspective that permits natural/unnatural distinctions is the Judeo-Christian world view.  Sin is unnatural, because God is holy.  Death and disasters are unnatural, because God created a perfect world that was cursed because of sin.  Human beings stand between the natural and the supernatural by having the image of God implanted in their nonphysical souls.  These foundations allow for politics, economics, criminal law, and all the institutions that engage us, including science.    Materialists need to be challenged when they blindly refer to nature, natural, or unnatural.  They also need to be challenged when they disparage the “super”-natural.  “Super” is a prefix that means above.  But it doesn’t matter if something is above (super-), below (sub-), beyond (epi-), around (peri-), opposed (anti-), or not (non-, un-).  If it is outside the natural box, it is unnatural or super-natural by definition.  Naturalism wants to subsume everything in its definition of the universe.  If a naturalist wants to categorize anything as unnatural, whether creationism, pseudoscience, or conservative politics, he unmasks himself as a supernaturalist in spite of himself.    Christians may want to refer to a document at this site to learn how to unmask pseudo-naturalism, entitled, Naturalism and Supernaturalism: A False Dichotomy.  In addition to exploring the many meanings of natural, it exposes the impossibility of pure materialism.  If no one can avoid being a supernaturalist (and the materialist must be one to engage in argumentation using symbolic language, reason and logic), it changes the nature of the debate on origins.(Visited 11 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Cheaper internet for South Africa

first_imgSouth Africans are tipped to accessaffordable internet. Cell C’s Lars Reichelt said they aim toconnect all parts of South Africa. Vodacom has improved its infrastructurein Johannesburg. (Images: Bongani Nkosi)MEDIA CONTACTS• My Broadband+27 12 687 5159• Broadband InfracoFahim MohamedCompany Secretary+27 11 235 1760Bongani NkosiBroadband pundits are predicting internet connection rates in South Africa to drop by between 20% and 25% in the next 12 months.Most of the executives who spoke at the My Broadband conference in Midrand, north of Johannesburg, on 20 October forecast that prices will drop significantly in the next year, citing new infrastructure developments and escalating competition in the industry.Broadband wholesaler and network operator Neotel forecast price cuts of about 20%. Underwater cable operator Seacom’s Suveer Ramdhani said they expect international rates to drop by between 20% and 25%.South Africans who are connected to networks are now using more broadband, a trend that’s a plus to the growth of the young industry.  “You’ll see costs dropping in the next 12 months. People are using more bandwidth,” said communications company Telkom’s managing executive Steve Lewis.Since the introduction of the Eassy and Seacom fibre optic cables, rates are said to have come down by about 40%. Eassy came online this year, while Seacom has been operational since 2009.“It’s great to see that prices have come down,” said Ryan Sher of Eassy. “There’s now more competition,” he added.“As an industry we’ve been keen to bring down prices,” said Sameer Dave of mobile provider MTN.There has certainly been an upsurge of mobile internet usage across the country. More and more South Africans now have Facebook accounts. Thousands of youngsters use Mxit and other chat sites. This is a prevailing trend even in rural areas where broadband connectivity is limited, and is aided by a range of data packages offered by all of South Africa’s mobile networks.“Prices are coming down, it’s a continuous evolution,” said mobile operator Vodacom’s CEO Pieter Uys.A great number of South Africans are currently without access to broadband connectivity. Of the estimated population of 47-million, between one and four million are said to be connected. This is blamed on inaccessibility to fibre optic networks in many areas, and excessively high rates for both internet service providers and consumers.“Local tariffs are still high, they have to drop,” said Uys.Infrastructure being improved Mobile service provider Cell C has embarked on a campaign to broaden its HSPA+ 900 network across the country. It’s already covered most of Port Elizabeth, where it started in September, and is aiming to have 34% of the country on the network by the end of 2010, with 64% connectivity by 2011.“We’re really serious about bringing the internet to the 45-million have-nots,” said Cell C’s CEO Lars Reichelt.The provider’s services have become the fastest in South Africa at 5.23 Mbps, surpassing other internet service providers including Telkom, Mweb, Vodacom, MTN and Internet Solutions. “Cell C is number one in terms of speed,” said Reichelt.He predicts that South Africa’s broadband capacity will improve within the next 12 months. “The amount of fibre that we have coming up is unbelievable. It is good news and we have to be smart about embracing it.”The West Africa Cable System fibre optic infrastructure is scheduled to go live by mid-2011. The 14 000km-long submarine network is predicted to be the next most exciting broadband connectivity development for Africa.Vodacom’s Uys said the group has also improved its infrastructure, having replaced all their equipment in Johannesburg over the last 18 months.The state-owned Broadband Infraco will launch in the third week of November, opening its fibre optic network for usage by internet service providers, which include the likes of Vodacom, Cell C, iBurst, MTN and a range of others. Infraco is focused on widening connectivity to provinces that are currently underserved.DOC and Icasa urgedThe industry called on the Department of Communications and the Independent Communications Authority of South Africa to play more decisive roles in regulating the telecommunications industry. “We need a strong DoC and a strong Icasa,” said John Holdsworth, CEO of telecoms group ECN.Icasa “should stand up and take control” over the current 89 cents charged for interconnection between mobile networks, Holdsworth said. “The interconnection rate is too high.”Internet rates in South Africa remain high compared to that of many countries, despite recent industry developments.8.ta bringing competitionIntroduced on 18 October, Telkom’s new mobile network 8.ta promised to “disrupt” the telecommunications industry. 8.ta became the fourth mobile network operator in South Africa, thereby increasing competition.Like the three other network operators, MTN, Vodacom and Cell C, 8.ta is also offering data services. Industry analysts have predicted tough times ahead as the new network attempts to penetrate the market, given that Cell C, which became a third mobile network operator in 2001, is yet to reach its maximum customer base.Virgin Mobile relies completely on Cell C’s network, therefore isn’t considered a mobile network operator but a units reseller.Telkom is confident of the network’s prospects. “We really believe this will succeed,” said Lewis.The network already enjoys a nationwide connectivity through its 800 new base stations. Telkom also signed agreements with Vodacom and MTN’s to roam on their infrastructure. “We’re starting to disrupt the market,” Lewis said.He added that they want to make broadband more affordable.More competition is good for consumers, the experts agreed. “We embrace competition. It’s good for everybody, for us and the consumers,” said Uys.last_img read more

Iowa water quality challenges daunting in scope

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest In the land of deep topsoil and row-crops from horizon to horizon, water battles are being waged that share similarities and some real differences with other parts of the country. In this final story of a series focused on water quality challenges and solutions around the country, the focus is on Iowa.Among the differences in Iowa are the political climate and the logistical realities of managing water nutrient levels in a state where there are fewer than 4 million people and nearly 28 million agricultural acres. Ohio, by comparison, has nearly 12 million people and 13.6 million acres of total agricultural land.That important ratio is likely one reason why Iowa has thus far taken a decidedly voluntary approach to dealing with water quality issues in the heart of the nation when compared to the high level of mandates in California and the Chesapeake Bay water quality improvement measures. Ohio’s mandate levels are somewhere in the middle.That does not mean that there are no efforts to change things in Iowa. One of the most discussed examples happened last year when the Des Moines Water Works filed a lawsuit against Buena Vista, Calhoun and Sac County Boards of Supervisors in their roles as governing authorities for 10 drainage districts over nitrates in the water.“We are disappointed a public utility would choose to do this. I think we would prefer to work in partnership and collaboration with downstream interests. We are concerned about the precedent the lawsuit makes in terms of creating this antagonism. It has generated a lot more conversation, however,” said Roger Wolf, director of Environmental Programs and Services at the Iowa Soybean Association. “They have a nitrate removal plant in Des Moines and they are trying to make the case that the upstream community should be more accountable for the nitrate levels in the water. Des Moines Water Works will probably need to make some infrastructure upgrades over time. The reality is that the scope and scale of moving the needle in the river basin in terms of nitrates is enormous. It may be in the neighborhood $500 or $600 million to treat the problem in the basin compared with $1 million to treat the water downstream.”The agricultural community in Iowa, and around the country, will be closely watching this lawsuit as it unfolds in the coming months. But, for now, Iowa agriculture has firmly embraced a voluntary effort to address water quality issues including very aggressive phosphorus and nitrogen reduction goals.“The biggest issue right now in Iowa related to water quality is a focus on our state Nutrient Reduction Strategy — it addresses the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Plan. We border the Mississippi River and these new nutrient strategies are going to be where the action is for the foreseeable future with nutrient and water quality issues,” Wolf said. “Nitrogen is the bigger issue with hypoxia but we address nitrogen and phosphorus in the strategy. It is unique in that it put things in the perspective of both point source and nonpoint source and each type of stakeholder class has a dedicated set of actions where they are working for a combined 45% reduction of N and 45% reduction in P leaving the state of Iowa. Those are very aggressive numbers, but they parallel what the hypoxia plan is calling for.“It is a voluntary effort and it links to existing rules. Iowa did not pass a special law for this. It brings to bear some of the best evidence-based science we have from land grant universities on the performance of various strategies to do nutrient reduction in the landscape. It really aligns all of the agencies and partners to work in collaboration, which are features we think are very important.”Now in its third year, the strategy advocates the implementation of practices to reduce nitrogen and phosphorus loss. Practices include: the use of nitrogen inhibitors, cover crops, extending rotation, retiring land, drainage water management, wetland creation, bioreactors, buffers, and adapting nutrient application timing, source, and rate.“As we have launched this strategy, the state has provided money to start demonstrating technology. Right now we have 32 demonstration sites that are project areas based by watershed that support active implementation of technologies,” Wolf said. “Now we are beginning to implement the strategy and raise awareness of farmers so they can learn that these things can be an important aspect of their operation. These are on-the-ground projects where farmers can learn about experimenting with these things and look at on-farm research.”In addition, the Iowa Soybean Association operates a state-wide water-monitoring program to assess the impacts of land use decisions.“At ISA we are unique in that we have a water quality testing lab in house. The monitoring really helps us target key areas and gives farmers a good idea of the kind of nutrient levels coming out of tile lines. In some cases we find good opportunities to improve,” Wolf said. “I am part of the ISA research program with 25 staff working on crop production issues related to making sure we maintain productivity of crops, looking at the impacts of the business of raising crops, and then the impacts all of these things have on our natural resources. We bring a lot of data collection into this to help farmers make better decisions. There is a lot of learning taking place with farmers looking at how to fit these practices into their operations.”There has been good initial progress, Wolf feels, but the next steps are going to require significant funding. Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad has proposed a sales tax extension to generate $4.7 billion in funding for water quality improvements. The House and Senate in Iowa have considered other fund raising methods for this issue but all state legislative efforts, thus far, have failed to materialize.“The state department of agriculture provided $9.6 million last year for demonstration projects and farmers enrolling their land in conservation practices. We tried to leverage that funding with federal funding sources as well,” Wolf said. “Planting cover crops can cost $25 or $30 an acre. With low market prices, there is more than a little concern about how that practice can be paid for. Cost-share and financial assistance are going to be very important. We need dedicated and substantial financial support because we are talking about 26 million acres of corn and soybeans in Iowa.”last_img read more

Reprieve for Gautam Navlakha: HC extends interim relief from arrest

first_imgThe Bombay High Court on Tuesday extended the interim relief from arrest till June 26 for activist Gautam Navlakha’s alleged involvement in the Bhima Koregaon violence.A division bench of Justices Ranjit More and Bharati Dangre was hearing a plea filed by Mr. Navlakha urging the court to quash the first information report registered against him by Pune police.In the previous hearing, the Bench was presented with some letters written to Mr. Navlakha by senior Maoist leaders. On perusing them, the court said, “There is nothing against him (Mr. Navlakha) in any of the letters. We are of the prima facie opinion that there is nothing against him based on the documents submitted to us.”Additional Public Prosecutor Aruna Kamat Pai had submitted additional documents seized from Mr. Navlakha’s laptop in a sealed envelope to the court and said they cannot be shared with Mr. Navlakha as the investigation against him in the case is still on.The Bench had remarked, “There is nothing secretive in these documents. We are of the prima facie opinion that these documents can be given to him.”On Wednesday, Ms. Pai said she cannot share the documents with Mr. Navlakha at this stage. The hearing has been adjourned to June 26.last_img read more

Federer on verge of Wimbledon immortality

first_imgVictory over Croatian giant Marin Cilic will also give him a 19th career Grand Slam title and second in three majors this year after sweeping to a fifth Australian Open in January following a six-month absence.“I was hoping to be in good shape when the grass court season came around,” said Federer who, for good measure, also pocketed back-to-back Masters at Indian Wells and Miami as well as a ninth Halle grass court crown.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“The first three, four months were just like a dream really. So this is something I was working towards, you know, Wimbledon, to be in good shape. I’m happy it’s paying off here now.”Federer admits his form in 2017 has surprised even himself after he shut down his 2016 season to rest a knee injury in the aftermath of his brutal five-set semi-final loss at Wimbledon to Milos Raonic. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ While ‘Big Four’ rivals Murray, Novak Djokovic and Rafael Nadal failed to even make the semi-finals, Federer has been reborn.He came into Wimbledon having radically pruned his playing schedule, skipping the entire clay court season.Wimbledon is just his seventh event of the year; 28-year-old Cilic is in his 15th.Federer, reveling in the spotlight of having played all his matches on Centre Court, has hardly been troubled on his way to the final.He has lost serve just four times and spent four and a half hours less on court than Cilic.Federer also boasts a 6-1 career record over Cilic, the 2014 US Open champion who has made his first Wimbledon final at the 11th attempt.However, Cilic’s game is made for grass and 12 months ago he led Federer by two sets to love and held three match points in an epic quarter-final which the Swiss superstar eventually claimed. ‘Roger’s home court’When Cilic won his only Slam in New York three years ago, he demolished Federer in straight sets in the semi-finals.“I don’t want to say it’s more relaxed going into it because I have a good head-to-head record against Marin, even though the matches were extremely close,” said Federer.“But it’s not like we’ve played against each other 30 times. You feel like you have to reinvent the wheel.  Harden intent on winning title in wake of new deal Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet View comments National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress LATEST STORIES MOST READ Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’center_img This combination of pictures created on January 29, 2017 shows Switzerland’s tennis player Roger Federer holding up his 18 Grand Slam titles. 1st row, from left : Australian Open 2017, Wimbledon 2012, Australian Open 2010, Wimbledon 2009, Roland Garros 2009, US Open 2008. 2nd row, from left : US Open 2007, Wimbledon 2007, Australian Open 2007, US Open 2006, Wimbledon 2006, Australian Open 2006. 3rd row, from left : US Open 2005, Wimbledon 2005, US Open 2004, Wimbledon 2004, Australian Open 2004, Wimbledon 2003. / AFP PHOTO / STFFive years after his last Wimbledon triumph, Roger Federer can capture a record eighth All England Club title Sunday and become the tournament’s oldest men’s champion of the modern era.With his 36th birthday fast approaching, the evergreen Swiss will comfortably succeed Arthur Ashe, who was almost 32 when he won in 1975, as Wimbledon’s most senior champion.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “It’s more straightforward, in my opinion. I think that’s nice in some ways. It’s a nice change, but it doesn’t make things easier.”Cilic is only the second Croatian man to reach the Wimbledon final after Goran Ivanisevic, his former coach, who swept to a memorable title victory in 2001.A win on Sunday would also make him the first Wimbledon champion outside of Federer, Murray, Djokovic and Nadal since Lleyton Hewitt triumphed in 2002.However, he has only won one of his last 12 matches against a top five player at the Slams, even if that was over Federer in New York three years ago.Cilic has fired 130 aces at Wimbledon this year and dropped just 10 service games.“This is Roger’s home court, the place where he feels the best and knows that he can play the best game,” said Cilic.“Obviously I’m going to look back, 12 months ago I was one point away from winning a match against him here. But it’s still a big mountain to climb.”Federer’s defeated semi-final opponent Tomas Berdych sees only one winner on Sunday.“I don’t see anything that would indicate Roger is getting older. He’s just proving his greatness in our sport,” said the Czech. Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plant Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games He has 30 wins and just two losses this year and he has reached his 11th Wimbledon final without dropping a set.‘Unbelievably excited’Sunday’s match will be his 102nd at the tournament and his 29th final at the majors.“It makes me really happy, making history here at Wimbledon. It’s a big deal. I love this tournament,” said Federer, who has been tied with Pete Sampras on seven Wimbledon titles since beating Andy Murray in the 2012 final.“All my dreams came true here as a player. To have another chance to go for number eight now, be kind of so close now at this stage, is a great feeling. “Yeah, unbelievably excited. I hope I can play one more good match. 11 finals here, all these records, it’s great. I’m so close now.”ADVERTISEMENT El Nido residents told to vacate beach homeslast_img read more

Hedwig And The Angry Inch Partners With HetrickMartin Institute

first_imgProducers of Hedwig and the Angry Inch on Broadway have announced a charitable partnership with Hetrick-Martin Institute, “the nation’s oldest and largest organization helping gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, and questioning youth to reach their full potential.”Hedwig and the Angry Inch begins preview performances Saturday and opens April 22 at the Belasco Theatre with How I Met Your Mother’s Neil Patrick Harris starring as Hedwig, a fictional East German rock singer living as a female after a botched gender-reassignment operation.The musical will donate a portion from each ticket sale to Hetrick-Martin Institute, home of the Harvey Milk High School, a New York City public transfer school where at-risk youth can learn without fear of physical or emotional attacks. According to a press release, the partnership “will also utilize the resources of the production, including representatives from the show meeting with young people in an educational and mentoring capacity, and additional fundraising support.”“Hetrick-Martin Institute has always been a part of Hedwig’s DNA and I’m thrilled HMI is able to join Hedwig on her journey to Broadway,” writes producer David Binder in a statement. “Our cast, creative team, and my fellow producers have been overwhelming in their support of this initiative benefiting this inspiring and incredibly important organization.”Hetrick-Martin Institute CEO Thomas Krever adds, “HMI is deeply grateful to Neil Patrick Harris and the entire Hedwig and the Angry Inch production team for partnering with HMI to help us provide life-changing programs to LGBTQ youth. Hedwig’s message of being proud of who you are resonates deeply with the thousands of youth we serve each year.”Hedwig’s relationship with Hetrick-Martin Institute began with the 2003 tribute album Wig in a Box: Songs From and Inspired by Hedwig and The Angry Inch, which benefited HMI, and the 2006 film Follow My Voice, a documentary about the Harvey Milk High School and the making of Wig in a Box.For more information on the charitable partnership, visit HedwigBroadway.com/HMI.last_img read more