Annenberg hosts Hack the Gender Gap for women

first_imgThe Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism in collaboration with MediaShift  — a virtual media company and online magazine that covers how traditional media is changing due to technologies like podcasting, blogs and social media — organized a women’s hackathon over the weekend in Wallis Annenberg Hall to provide opportunities and spaces for women to turn their ideas into viable businesses.The winner of the hackathon was the team with the idea for Habitat, an environmental news startup that uses virtual reality storytelling. Honorable mention was given to LikelyMedia, which would use virtual reality and real data to make projections about the future and VRacity Media, which would provide virtual reality journalism content via a subscription service and supported by sponsored content.“It’s really important for journalists to explore this area because it’s growing so rapidly; it’s a very powerful form of storytelling,” said Amara Aguilar, assistant professor of professional practice in digital journalism at USC Annenberg and one of the judges of the hackathon. “It’s especially important for women to be involved in this industry because women are greatly underrepresented in these industries, and we really need that diversity to lead and to tell powerful stories.”Publisher and founder of MediaShift Mark Glaser said Hack the Gender Gap came from West Virginia Reed College of Media, one of the sponsors of the event. Glaser worked with school to host a similar hackathon in October 2014. Glaser said he visited USC last January and discussed the possibility of hosting a hackathon at USC with Willow Bay, director of the school of journalism.“The idea is how can we give women and students a chance and space that they might not get and feel empowered to be in teams, creating things on their own, and having great support network,” he said. “The goal has always been [to] get women to do what they might not be able to do under circumstances and [to] give them a unique experience they wouldn’t get otherwise especially in schools where they don’t have things like this.”The hackathon, attended by 75 students and participants and 15 mentors from the fields of technology, marketing and media who served as facilitators, started Friday night with a panel discussion.The talk hosted female technology and business leaders that focused on how women in technology and media are achieving success, breaking down barriers and making a difference.The panel included Sara Christenson from the investment company Raptor Group; Alex Schaffert, managing director of digital strategy and innovation at KPCC: Carrie Southworth, cofounder of Twigtale, a platform for personalized children’s books; Potsie Rivera, former UI UX designer for dating app Grindr; and Jennifer de la Fuente, web designer and Annenberg adjunct professor.Bay, the moderator of the panel asked the panelists, “Is tech a boys’ club?” Schaffert answered.“The world is a boys’ club. But change is around the corner. There are free coding classes in libraries in Los Angeles. Girls are already going to the libraries,” she said. “We just have to make sure that these skills are available [and accessible] in public spaces.”Bay added that women are heavy users of social media and the key audience in that marketplace, yet companies are not hiring the majority of their user base.“That’s what our research has shown as well — the majority of users of social media are women,” said Jean Truelson, Annenberg alumna, CEO and founder of the San Francisco-based company Dogpatch and a mentor for the hackathon. “For me as founder, I want to be able to build enough of that space and support in social media. I know the majority of my potential users are women. I’m here to support them because I want to be able to hire them later, or support their company and future startups that are going to get out of this group.”Truelson said the best advice for women interested in entrepreneurship is to get started.“Don’t get too stuck in just doing research, or ‘I need more education,’” she said. “You can go and get an MBA if you want to work for a major company but if you want to learn how to start a company. Start a company. That’s when you really learn everything you need to do and make all the mistakes — it’s truly a good job training. If you have an idea, and you’re truly passionate about it, go and do it.”Students who attended this hackathon echoed this enthusiasm and interest. After the opening panel, the students formed teams to come up with startup ideas utilizing immersive journalism and virtual reality.“I like the opportunity to collaborate, and it’s an interesting environment where folks from across the country, with different skill sets, different years as well as experience, just to be able to work together and collaborate on a project is a really interesting proposition,” Monica Castillo, a graduate student in journalism said. “I don’t know much about [virtual reality], and I learned a lot already so far, whatever its limitations, whatever we can make [out of] it. This is kinda like a classroom.”Jordyn Holman, a senior majoring in print and digital journalism and a columnist for the Daily Trojan, said the hackathon challenged her team to think outside of the box because virtual reality is so different from traditional print and digital journalism.“Technology is the future,” she said. “You need to get these technical skills, but conferences like this shows you exactly what skills you need and exactly how they can be used for reporting specifically [with] virtual reality — which takes people right there — that’s kinda the whole point of journalism, to make people understand. Virtual reality is the biggest gift in making people understand what’s happening.”last_img read more

Year 2016: A year of big money sport deals

first_imgShare on: WhatsApp Paris, France | AFP | Money flooded into sport in 2016 faster than ever before and flooded out in the shape of fatter salaries for the stars who have become multi-million business brands.Paul Pogba’s world record transfer to Manchester United set the tone for a year of big money deals that handed the French 23-year-old wealth beyond the dreams of most of his Old Trafford fans.But even Pogba has got a long way to go to catch up with gold-plated stars like Barcelona’s Lionel Messi and his Real Madrid rival Cristiano Ronaldo, the world’s highest paid athlete according to Forbes, who banks just short of $1.7 million (1.6 million euros, £1.4 million) a week in salary and endorsements.Pogba’s five-year contract to join United may have raised eyebrows among football fans and critics but top-flight managers and sports business insiders had already priced-in mega transfer inflation.The explosion of TV rights made the Pogba contract possible, flooding the coffers of the English Premier League, making a mockery of economic austerity and the jobless queues.And the tide of high finance in sport did not stop there. TV income rose 40 percent for Germany’s Bundesliga while the US NBA enjoyed a vintage financial year and Formula One motor racing attracted a multi-billion dollar US takeover bid.Three years after Welshman Gareth Bale set a world record transfer figure of 101 million euros (around £80 million) for his move to Real Madrid, Pogba upped the ante with his 105 million-euro transfer to Manchester in August despite his failing to set sparks flying for France in Euro 2016.Former Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson told the Daily Mail that the moment the £8.3 billion ($10.75 billion, 9.6 billion euros) domestic TV deal covering 2016-2019 was signed between the Premier League and Sky Sports and BT Sport, “transfer values and salaries were going to go up.”– Star power – The result was not long in coming. Premier League clubs spent 1.38 billion euros during the 2016 summer transfer market window, 34 percent up on the previous year.The British game’s star power also spilled over into foreign markets, where broadcast rights sell to the highest bidder. The biggest deal to date was signed in November with Chinese video streaming service PPTV for 600 million euros.Elsewhere in Europe the Bundesliga cashed in hugely with a TV deal worth 3.48 billion euros over the next three years, a near 40 percent jump on the past year.If economic hardship tightened the purse strings somewhat in some other parts of Europe, the cash flowed thick and fast in basketball in the United States, where TV income tripled and the sport generated global revenue of $5.2 billion (4.8 billion euros) with operating profit of $900 million, a record, according to Forbes.At the same time, NBA clubs saw their value rise by an average 13 percent with the New York Knicks topping the financial league at $3 billion.With TV income up sharply since last year — and slightly higher than Premier League levels — NBA clubs are pushing up salaries, with LeBron James of the Cleveland Cavaliers seeing his $23 million dollar paycheck boosted to $30.9 million for the 2016/17 season.Formula One was also a big winner in the financial stakes. The sport deemed to be in severe decline still managed to attract the high rollers with US firm Liberty Media, run by billionaire John Malone, buying out F1’s parent company in a deal which values the sport at $8 billion.Formula One is gambling on gaining more exposure worldwide, including in the United States, hoping to generate an even wider revenue stream in the future. Logically, that will translate as even more money in the bank for the big stars.last_img read more

Aunt Becky Cites New Evidence that May Exonerate Her in College Cheating Scandal

first_imgThe evidence emerged in the case of another parent who’s being prosecuted. In notes taken from the phone of the scam’s mastermind, he suggests he told his clients they were paying donations to schools instead of bribes like prosecutors say. Evidence produced by prosecutors in the college admissions cheating scheme exonerates Lori Loughlin and her fashion designer husband, the couple’s attorneys said. https://t.co/i1DVtzCM1f— NBC News (@NBCNews) February 27, 2020 (Boston, MA) — New evidence in the college cheating scandal may exonerate Aunt Becky.As a result, actress Lori Loughlin is asking for a delay for setting a trial date over charges in the massive admissions cheating scandal.The “Full House” star and her husband fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli filed the motion after new evidence showed the ring leader of the admissions scam claiming federal investigators badgered him into “lying” about clients paying donations versus bribes.last_img read more

TRIPLE CROWN CHAMP VICTOR ESPINOZA TO ACCEPT 2016 SANTA ANITA GEORGE WOOLF MEMORIAL JOCKEY AWARD ON SUNDAY; MEXICO CITY NATIVE SELECTED BY A VOTE OF JOCKEYS NATIONWIDE

first_imgWOOLF AWARD TROPHY TO BE PRESENTED AFTER THE 6TH RACE SUNDAY AT SANTA ANITA ARCADIA, Calif. (March 10, 2016)–As America’s first Triple Crown Champion jockey in 37 years, Victor Espinoza helped Thoroughbred racing project a positive image far beyond the confines of the Thoroughbred industry throughout 2015, thus elevating the sport’s exposure and acceptance to a level perhaps not seen since the 1970s. Accordingly, Espinoza, a 43-year-old native of Mexico City, has been selected by a vote of jockeys nationwide as the winner of Santa Anita’s highly coveted 2016 George Woolf Memorial Jockey Award and he will accept the award in a Winner’s Circle ceremony following Sunday’s sixth race.“It’s quite an honor for any rider to be selected by his peers as the winner of such a prestigious award,” said Terry Meyocks, National Manager of the Jockeys’ Guild. “And I would like to congratulate Victor on this great achievement.”In addition to numerous national television appearances through the 2015 Triple Crown and last fall’s Breeders’ Cup World Championships, Espinoza also remained tireless in his efforts on behalf of cancer-stricken youth, donating 10 percent of his winnings to support pediatric cancer research at City of Hope, in nearby Duarte.With the Bob Baffert-trained American Pharoah providing the horsepower, Espinoza gleefully proclaimed himself “The luckiest Mexican on earth,” on national television following their win in the Belmont Stakes June 6.In addition to winning the Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont, Espinoza and Santa Anita-based American Pharoah won last year’s Grade II Rebel Stakes, Grade I Arkansas Derby, Grade I Haskell Invitational and, in a performance for the ages, the $5 million Breeders’ Cup Classic by 6 ½ lengths on Oct. 31–all the while elevating the profile of jockeys nationwide and generating tremendous ratings on a consistent basis.Born on a dairy farm near Mexico City, Espinoza is the 11th of 12 children. A three-time ESPY Award winner, Espinoza has three career Kentucky Derby wins, three Preakness victories, three Breeders’ Cup wins and he’s taken 11 Southern California riding titles.First presented by Santa Anita in 1950, Espinoza is the 67th winner of the Woolf Award, which seeks to honor riders whose careers and personal character earn esteem for the individual and Thoroughbred racing. The remaining four finalists for this year’s award, which can only be won once during a rider’s career, were Joe Bravo, Javier Castellano, Gerard Melancon and Joe Steiner.last_img read more