Feel the tranquillity in this Gold Coast property

first_imgWhat a pool! From the front. 55 Simpsons Rd, Elanora has hit the market.WELCOME to your own private oasis.Vendors Clint and Danielle Barends bought their slice of paradise in Elanora in 2010.“We moved from a small block in Palm Beach wanting space, privacy and quietness,” Mrs Barends said. The indoors flows outside to the deck and pool.“It’s like living in the bush as we look down to a nature reserve. It’s a big strip where we get all sorts of animals including koalas and wallabies.”Since owning it, the pair have completely modernised the house.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa18 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days ago“The house was only seven years old but it had terracotta and blue tiles everywhere,” the mother-of-three said.“It wasn’t rundown as such, it was a just brick house that we basically modernised.”These changes included partially renovating the bathrooms and kitchen and installing new carpet in the bedrooms. There’s plenty for the kids to do.Mrs Barends said the property was a great family home or entertainer’s haven.“Once you come down the driveway it is a really flat, single-storey residence,” she said.“We’ve retained the backyard, landscaped it and put plants in so it’s a very low-maintenance property. “You can really just live here and enjoy it.”Billy Jaz and Jason Monk, McGrath — Palm Beach are taking the property to auction on April 21. Relax in the lounge.Outside, the pair installed a spectacular pool and covered the entertaining area.“The outdoors is really brought inside in the way the kitchen, lounge and deck area all flow,” she said. “It’s a lovely easy layout to live in.”The pair also rendered the outside of the house and restored the roof and driveway.” The kitchen has been modernised.last_img read more

Campaigner’s support for Balotelli

first_img The text then read: “Be like Mario. He’s an Italian plumber, created by Japanese people, who speaks English and looks like a Mexican” and went on to describe a black man and a Jewish person. After people criticised the post, he deleted it before writing on his Twitter account that his mother was Jewish. And he issued a statement to apologise, explaining he was trying to be “anti-racist with humour”. Ged Grebby from Show Racism the Red Card (SRtRC), an educational charity which uses football to promote an anti-racism message, was encouraged by Balotelli’s immediate apology. That was in contrast to other senior figures in football who have been criticised for making racist remarks recently, but who had not fully apologised, he said. Mr Grebby, who is the campaign’s chief executive, said: “I think it says something about Mario that he had the decency to do that.” Mr Grebby said the charity condemned Balotelli’s deleted post, and said it could not be justified. But a major message of SRtRC was to get people to recognise their own racist behaviour, to admit it and then to change. “With Mario, almost immediately, he deleted the post he had done, recognised his mistake and said sorry,” Mr Grebby said. Controversial Liverpool striker Mario Balotelli has received the support of a leading anti-racism campaigner – because he immediately apologised for apparently making a racist and anti-Semitic post. The Italy forward has until 6pm on Friday to respond to the Football Association, which has asked him for an explanation, before a decision will be made whether to charge him. Balotelli, 24, had reposted an image from the computer game Super Mario on his Instagram page with the heading “Don’t be a racist”. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

Bold with beauty

first_img“It makes you want to watch more,” Aliyah said. “[Seeing them] painting their face in the best way possible makes you want to sit down with a cup of coffee and watch them do their work.”  When Davis is not experimenting and creating different makeup looks or working on photography, they can be found writing in their journal, filming videos or participating in student organizations, like the Black Student Assembly’s Creative Experience, all of which are key passions in their life. “There are a lot of really helpful resources on there for learning the basics of filming and editing. Every time I’m not too sure about something, I just look up a YouTube tutorial, and those definitely help out a lot,” Davis said. “For makeup, I’d say you’ve just got to practice a lot. So I would literally just do makeup at like 3 in the morning.”  Glam, glitter and bold lashes — since the first moment makeup artist and photographer Avery Davis laid eyes on the dramatic painted faces and elongated winged eyeliner integral to drag queen makeup, they have always been attracted to a bold and colorful aesthetic. From both their professional work and personal creative endeavors on YouTube and Instagram, Davis is an icon on campus known for their dark and beautiful works of art, be it through makeup or photography. In the beginning stages of their makeup journey, Davis said that their favorite beauty influencer was Michelle Phan, a pioneer of the YouTube beauty community, who arguably invented the concept of a beauty guru. Some of their favorite content creators on the YouTube platform include Jackie Aina and Miles Jai, both of whom are YouTubers who produce videos, such as wig reviews and foundation range tests, that cater specifically to the Black community’s experience in beauty.  Their makeup rates range from $45 to $60, totaling $80 to $100 if a photoshoot is included, Davis said. When Davis first began delving into makeup, Davis’ family and friends were greatly supportive of their interest in the art form and their self-starter attitude. Gaining rising popularity on their YouTube channel, Davis also eagerly shares their enthusiasm for makeup artistry online through storytimes and “Get Ready With Me” style videos. One of Davis’ goals as an influencer is to be an active role model, encouraging others to disregard hateful opinions and freely express themselves. Photo courtesy of Avery Davis Davis’ self-confidence has allowed them to pursue bold and transformative looks, featuring dramatic eyelashes, reflective glitter and colorful rhinestones. Some of these looks include drag and pride makeup, and tutorials for them can be found on Davis’ YouTube channel. Davis said they are interested in pursuing YouTube as a career if it takes off in the future, but as of now, they use it as a creative outlet to share their passion for makeup and explore content creation. Described by USC alumna Kenya Aliyah, a close friend of Davis, their YouTube videos are almost like ASMR.  Their online presence on Instagram and YouTube has also been met with positive engagement, and  Davis hopes to grow their following to be an inspiration for more makeup enthusiasts.  Aliyah, who has modeled for Davis several times, described the photoshoot process as very professional, yet fun and collaborative. Though Aliyah was new to modeling when she worked with Davis for the first time, they shared creative freedom in order for Davis’ characteristic dark and beautiful aesthetic to shine through. “Sometimes I’ll be like, ‘I want something really smoky,’ or ‘I want the base makeup and face to look really shiny,’ and just go off of that,” Davis said. “But  I don’t have a set goal or look in mind.”   “I did experience having some people who would make unnecessary comments when I was in high school, but also, I didn’t really care, so I was like, ‘Oh, OK,’” Davis said. “But I was also reaching a place where I … stopped listening and caring about what other people think.”  When creating looks, Davis normally waits for some inspiration or chooses to highlight a certain facial feature such as a cut crease eyeshadow look or a glossy lip. “I have a couple goals. One of them would be to almost be on the same level as Pat McGrath [self-made billionare], where it’s like I’m able to participate in runway makeup,” they said. “And even just having a makeup look get published by a really highly established publication … or to just be published in a Hollywood publication — that would be really nice.”center_img One of Davis’ favorite looks is more avant garde.  “Most times I’ll let them take creative freedom because I really trust their judgment,” Evins said. “All issues always come out really amazing, so I plan to just let them do their thing and like come up with their own ideas, because it never fails, honestly.” For aspiring makeup artists and beginner photographers, Davis recommends checking out YouTube.  “I don’t have an audience yet, and [it’s] just people commenting so that’s nice,” Davis said.  As a professional, one of Davis’ most memorable jobs was doing makeup for UMI for her music video, “High School,” released in 2019. For those interested in hiring Davis for freelance makeup and photography work, Davis said they are flexible with monetizing their creativity, prioritizing the art form itself.  A senior majoring in cinema and media studies, Davis serves and centers bold and daring looks on their Instagram, @stayservinglooks. Davis grew up in Compton and has been practicing makeup for about six years. Like many aspiring makeup artists, their journey began out of simple curiosity coupled with the need for a creative outlet to balance the stress of school and express their sense of identity.  “I have no brows, and it’s more of a blue look. And I just really like that one because I think my eyeliner looked really good that day,” Davis said, laughing.   “It was easier for my family to support me because like all of the makeup I had, I bought myself,” Davis said.  Discovering popular beauty gurus on YouTube to learn skills and find inspiration helped Davis gain increasing confidence in their makeup looks. They later decided to dive into the field of photography to capture and share the beauty of their makeup artistry. Branching off into photography inspired Davis to practice professionally and help others in the creative process of sharing their art. USC alumna Ryan Evins has also worked with Davis on album art for her music career and is eager to keep working with them in the future.  “[Davis’ aesthetic] is bold and colorful and has a message behind it — something that you’ve never seen before,” Giná said. “[There’s an] idea and thought behind it, like [each photo] based on the persona that they’re trying to recreate. They love glam, they love lashes, they love glitter, so they’re very expressive.” A future project Davis has in mind is with USC alumna Tiah Giná in a futuristic Afro-centric photoshoot. According to Giná, Davis’ strong suit is their expressiveness and boldness with painting colors and shapes on the face.  “I feel like the beauty of the muse and the photograph [always shines in] every photo I see,” Aliyah said. “I feel like you can really see the person and there’s always like a story behind it.”  Despite the familial support and online encouragement of their 1,501 followers on Instagram, Davis has also encountered some negativity along the way, but it has failed to faze them.last_img read more

Assistant coach Knight uses own flaws to instill coaching values at Syracuse

first_imgBrendon Knight didn’t have a team to play for.His junior hockey league team had just lost its final game, and there were no Division I college hockey offers waiting for him. So he drove over 2,000 miles across Canada to Calgary and lived with his uncle while working a dead-end job filling orders in a grocery store warehouse.“I just found myself surrounded by my coworkers that had been working at that job for like 15–20 years and I was looking at them saying to myself, ‘I don’t want to end up like these guys,’” Knight said.SUNY-Potsdam assistant coach Jay Green heard Knight wasn’t playing anywhere and called him. Desperate just to play again, Knight accepted the offer.Twenty years later, Knight is in his third season as an assistant with Syracuse. After playing for the Bears, and then for Isle of Wight Raiders in the England Premier League, Knight began his coaching career. At SU, Knight focuses on the forwards and special teams units, including an improved penalty kill unit that has killed off 86 percent of opponent’s power plays in the last six games.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textKnight teaches his players to not make the mistakes that he made when he played. Though he had trouble with listening to coaches when he was younger, as a coach he’s tried to connect with the players and show them they still have a lot to learn.“He does a good job of showing he knows the game and he’s a caring guy,” SU head coach Paul Flanagan said. “I know he’s created a very good bond with (the players) as a group.”Despite being talented, boasting soft hands and an accurate shot, Knight frustrated a lot of coaches.When Knight would slack off during games, his father, John Knight, would yell “hustle” from the stands. But because no one in Quebec knew what the word meant, they thought John Knight was calling his son an asshole.A stubborn Knight thought he knew more than those trying to help him — including his parents and coaches.“If you’re the biggest fish in the pond, you’re not the biggest fish in the ocean,” John Knight said. “But if you’re the biggest fish in the pond, it’s hard to convince the kid to grow.”Too small for the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League, which he was drafted into at 16, Knight wanted to play for a college in the United States.He received letters from D-I programs including Harvard, but unfamiliar with the NCAA recruiting system, Knight thought they were generic letters and he never followed up on the schools’ inquiries.“I wasn’t exactly the hardest worker off the ice,” Knight said. “I didn’t really put in a lot of time. I relied heavily on my so-called talent, I guess, and that only brought me so far.”At the age of 18, Knight wasn’t playing hockey in Calgary and felt that something was missing.So he had his dad shipped his hockey equipment to him and Knight started playing in a local men’s league. For the first time in his life, he started working out. After just nine months, he started playing for SUNY-Potsdam.Success with Potsdam soothed Knight’s relationship with the sport and after college he spent a year playing in England. For the first time in his career, he was put on the penalty kill and asked to be a two-way player, blocking shots for the first time.Knight was planning for another year in Europe when Potsdam called again about a coaching position. Wanting to extend his career with the sport that had consumed his life, Knight retired from playing in 2002 to start his career behind the bench.After three years coaching at Potsdam, then six at Hamilton, Knight made his way to Syracuse in 2012.Now, he tries to use his own strained relationship with coaches and hot shot mentality from his playing career as a cautionary tale to his current players.“I think that’s the biggest mistake with the young hockey players today, they think that they know it all,” Knight said. “And I’m here to tell them that we don’t … I don’t know if it works all the time but hopefully a couple of them understand that.” Comments Published on January 20, 2015 at 12:07 am Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettus Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Betty Zimmerman, 86, formerly from Wellington: January 1, 1929 – April 30, 2015

first_imgBetty L. Zimmerman, age 86, of Strong City, KS, died Thursday, April 30, 2015, at the Golden Living Center of Chase County in Cottonwood Falls, KS.  The daughter of Jack and Genevieve Haden, she was born January 1, 1929, in Appleton City, MO.  She graduated from Toledo Township High School in 1946.She was married to Jerry Mosby (deceased) of Wellington, KS, for 20 years and they were the parents of five children.  She and Robert Zimmerman were married December 13, 1969, in Tacoma, WA.  While they lived in Washington, they raised peacocks, geese, ducks, and hogs, plus had a pack burro to protect the other animals from bears.Betty enjoyed sewing, quilting, doing and teaching ceramics, and also owned craft stores in Wellington, Cottonwood Falls, and Strong City.  She crocheted many hats and blankets for premature infants through a program from hospitals.  She worked at Beverly Enterprises nursing home as a certified nurse aide and activity director.  She & Bob operated Fox Creek Ranch, then managed the motel both in Strong City.  They were gate attendants at Council Grove Reservoir for 22 years.  They enjoyed “RVing”.She is survived by her husband, Robert (Bob), of the home;  two sons:  Mike Mosby (Kay) of Haviland and Pat Mosby (Tonja) of Strong City; three daughters:  Sandy Brown of Strong City, Debbie Blasi (Bill) of Wellington; and Betty Page (Steve) of Lake Stevens, WA; a brother, Billy Haden (Ruth) of Wamego; 13 grandchildren:  Roy Brown of Strong City, Brian Brown of Wellington, Michelle Brownlee (Mark) of Wellington, Melissa Janzen of Wellington, Jason Blasi of Wellington, Jessica Mosby of Americus; Angela Mosby of Haviland, Marie Lester of Granite Falls, WA, Lori Hyvari (Steve) of Granite Falls, WA, Bill Lilgreen of Lake Stevens, WA, Kelli Armour (Tim) of Palestine, TX,  Derek Mosby of Emporia, KS, and Chris Mosby of Strong City; 21 great-grandchildren; six great-great-grandchildren; and three step-children:  Bobby Zimmerman, David Zimmerman, and Loree Deede all of WA.  She was preceded in death by her parents.A private family graveside service will be held at a later date in Hillcrest Cemetery at Toledo Township.  Memorial contributions to the Chase County Senior Center may be sent in care of Brown-Bennett-Alexander Funeral Home, 201 Cherry, Cottonwood Falls, KS 66845.  Condolence messages may be left at www.brown-bennett-alexander.com.last_img read more

WHY THEY’RE ACTIVE AND HAPPY IN BARNES

first_imgA big high 5 to St Francis’ National School, Barnesmore, which has been awarded its first Active School Flag for excellence in physical education by the Department of Education and Skills.At a flag raising ceremony in the school the significant contributions of various sections of the school community were duly acknowledged. These included the Board of Management, teachers, ancillary staff, parents and pupils, local clubs, the HSE, members of the school gardening committee and an Garda SíochánaThe extent of pupil engagement with the process was also noted. This included: • participation in sporting events (home and away),• performance (including rap, song and dance)• active school displays,• cross curricular projects, • logo competition• art exhibitionThe awarding of the flag culminated in a high octane Active School week, featuring the World Premiere of Happy at St Francis’ NS., a video recorded in and around the school by 6th class student, Emily Erskine.Fr Danny McBrearty blessed the flag and endorsed the school’s commitment to continued engagement in active projects for physical and mental health in the future. Students from the ASF committee then stepped forward to raise the flag.As it shimmied up the flagpole, the fingers of a gentle June breeze unfurled it tentatively to an approving sun. There was applause and final words of thanks which were drowned out by the growl of a passing tractor.It didn’t matter, however. For all present the raucous racket might just as well have been rockin’ to the Pharrell Williams’ Happy, adopted sound track of St Francis’ NS Active School Year 2013-2014.WHY THEY’RE ACTIVE AND HAPPY IN BARNES was last modified: July 4th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:BarnesmoredonegalSt Farnces NAtional Schoollast_img read more