New inductees into property Hall of Fame

first_imgKersley Lane by AVJenningsFrank Charnock arrived in Australia in 1961 at a time when the nation’s property investment industry was non-existent.Ms Lloyd-Hurwitz described Mr Charnock “as a seasoned professional with a razorsharp business brain, an uncanny ability to pick emerging markets and property cycles, and a passion for people”.When Mr Charnock later left Australian shores three decades later, the long-time CEO of Jones Lang Wootton, now JLL, had professionalised an entire industry, she said. “Frank championed cross-border investment and spearheaded a new way of thinking aboutcommercial property in Australia,” Ms Lloyd-Hurwitz said.“His advice to institutional investors and developers helped to shape the skylines of Australia’scities, and he unlocked the flow of institutional wealth into property that helped build prosperity for generations of Australians.” Creekwood by AVJenningsTHE founder of one of the nation’s biggest residential development companies and a man who pioneered commercial real estate have been inducted in to the Australian Property Hall of Fame.Sir Albert Victor ‘AV’ Jennings, who passed away in 1993, and Frank Charnock will be honoured at an industry event in Canberra tonight. Sir Albert Jennings, founder of AVJennings, has been inducted in to the Australian Hall of Fame for his contribution to the property sector.Property Council of Australia national president Susan Lloyd-Hurwitz said both men were chosen by the board for their sustained and visionary leadership, and for their enduring contributions to the property industry and Australia.“Property is our nation’s largest industry, and the Australian Property Hall of Fame honours the leaders who have shaped the future of our cities and helped build the communities for people to work, live and enjoy their lives,” Ms Lloyd-Hurwitz said.“The Property Council is proud to honour the legacies of these property pioneers, and toshowcase the property industry’s central role in nation building.”Sir Albert Jennings was a struggling real estate agent during the Great Depression when he recognised a gap in the market for good quality homes. In 1932, he mortgaged his family home and formed the AV Jennings Construction Co, embarking on new housing projects and selling off-the-plan contracts — a strategy that became a hallmark of his business.“Building houses for Australians drove Sir Albert’s career,” Ms Lloyd-Hurwitz said.“Sir Albert’s story is one of calculated risks, understanding the industry at its best, but also at its worst.More from newsNew apartments released at idyllic retirement community Samford Grove Presented by Parks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus18 hours ago“Sir Albert’s belief in the Great Australian Dream never wavered.”AVJennings Limited CEO Peter Summers said the Hall of Fame induction was a fitting tribute to Sir Albert who laid the foundation for the residential property industry.“He was the instigator of high volume housing that offered Australians quality affordable homes and responsible for many industry innovations used today such as display homes and cul-de-sacs,” Mr Summers said.The award will be accepted by Sir Albert’s grandson Dr Iain Jennings.The company, which still bears its founders name, has seven residential communities currently under construction in Queensland.last_img read more

Scott Shafer hopes to have Eric Dungey back this week

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on September 26, 2015 at 5:19 pm Contact Matt: mcschnei@syr.edu | @matt_schneidman Scott Shafer hopes to get freshman quarterback Eric Dungey back in the beginning or middle of the upcoming week, the head coach said following Syracuse’s 34-24 loss to No. 8 LSU (3-0, 2-0 Southeastern) on Saturday.In Dungey’s place, sophomore walk-on Zack Mahoney went 16-of-38 for 154 yards passing and three touchdowns. He did throw an interception and fumbled on the first drive after being sacked, but his second-half performance allowed SU (3-1, 1-0 Atlantic Coast) to stay within striking distance until late in the fourth.The freshman, who suffered an upper-body injury after a helmet-to-helmet hit from Central Michigan defensive lineman Mitch Stanitzek, will be evaluated again tomorrow.“I can tell you he’s doing well,” Shafer said. “Hopefully we get Eric back here pretty quick, we’ll follow the whole protocol and make sure he’s in good shape.”Shafer added it’s going to take a few days to be sure Dungey is ready to return, but Syracuse’s bye week certainly doesn’t hurt. The Orange returns to action against South Florida on Oct. 10 in Tampa, Florida.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more

The NHL’s Winter Classic and All-Star Game still matter

first_imgCBS Sports’ Chris Bengel reported on Jan. 3 that the 2020 NHL Winter Classic between the Nashville Predators and host Dallas Stars at the Cotton Bowl drew the smallest television ratings since the game’s inauguration in 2008.For the first time, the Winter Classic failed to draw two million viewers, as this year’s event managed around 1.97-million. It’s the fifth straight year the game drew less than three million viewers. The novelty of outdoor games such as the Winter Classic may be waning on a national level, and the quality of play at the All-Star Game remains a mockery of good hockey. Cynics dismiss the Winter Classic and the All-Star Game as nothing more than an annual cash grab by the league.But as long as interest in both events remain strong at the local level, no one should fault the NHL for capitalizing on it. Professional hockey is a business, and part of it is stoking fan support at every level.The Winter Classic or the All-Star Game might not matter to the average NHL fan when viewed from afar. But when one of those events is staged in that fan’s hometown, they’ll happily pony up whatever the league wants to attend those games. MORE: What the 2020 Winter Classic meant to the NHL, Dallas and the southern hockey fanBengel suggested one reason for this year’s decline is the Winter Classic went up against two college football bowl games. He also pointed out it’s no longer the only outdoor game staged annually by the league — the Los Angeles Kings and Colorado Avalanche will play an outdoor game on Feb. 15 as part of the NHL’s Stadium Series.Some observers might attribute the decline to this year’s Winter Classic participants — the Dallas Stars and Nashville Predators — not coming from traditional hockey markets. Both clubs do lack a recognizable superstar on the level of Pittsburgh’s Sidney Crosby or Washington’s Alex Ovechkin.While the Winter Classic may have been a dud in the national American ratings, the Dallas Morning News’ Matthew DeFranks reported that the game set records in Dallas and Nashville as the most-watched regular-season contest for both clubs.For the host Stars, the Winter Classic was a smashing success. DeFranks noted the game drew 85,630 fans, making it the second most-attended game in NHL history. The demand for tickets forced the league to open up more seating. He also pointed out the Stars ordered more Winter Classic jerseys than any previous club. Those jerseys sold out within two days. Around 20,000 Predators fans also attended the game.How the game fares in its host market explains why the annual Winter Classic still matters even if its luster has faded on the national level. It helps sell the game, especially in so-called ‘non-traditional’ markets, and generates excitement among the local fan base. It opens those supporters to a unique game-watching experience they otherwise might never get to see.Winter Classic 2020: A recap of the Stars’ New Year’s Day win over NashvilleThe same can be said for the league’s annual All-Star Game. Some observers believe the event is no longer a worthy showcase for the game’s elite talent and call for its abolishment. The game’s quality of play, admittedly, is a joke: players want to avoid injury from participating in a glorified exhibition contest so they refrain from physical contact, turning the game into an offensive free-for-all.However, while the All-Star Game struggles in national television ratings, it draws well in the host cities. Fans get to watch the league’s best talent all play in one place, enjoy their efforts in the skills competitions and provide plenty of support during the game itself.The St. Louis Business Journal reports the upcoming All-Star Game in St. Louis could bring an estimated $20 million economic impact to the local community. The whole weekend annually serves as a boon to the host NHL city during the post-Christmas period when travel and tourism are down.last_img read more