Oman Shipping Readies Further Ship Investments after DSME Order

first_imgFollowing last week‘s order for two very large crude carriers (VLCC) placed with South Korean shipyard Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering (DSME), Oman Shipping Company is set on growing its fleet further.“The new additions to OSC’s VLCC fleet will be among the most technically advanced in the world,” OSC’s CFO and acting CEO Michael Jorgensen said. “They will form a key part of our expansion plan over the coming years as we prepare for further investment in oil and product carriers in 2019/2020, particularly in the bulk and container market.”Jorgensen added that the key elements of the next generation design of the two VLCCs include highly-efficient engine and fuel-saving technologies. They will also be outfitted with open loop scrubbers addressing the new SOX, NOX environmental regulations effective from January 1, 2020.“The investment comes as OSC continues to report strong growth following long-term deals with local refineries and traders. Our crude oil and product vessel portfolio accounts for more than half of the company’s national fleet. The latest expansion is a further reflection of the significant upturn in liquid cargoes, including crude, refined petroleum fuels and petrochemicals, being generated by Oman’s largely hydrocarbon-centric economy,” Jorgensen continued.“Much of the recent growth has been underpinned by major industrial and petrochemical clusters established at Sohar, Salalah and Duqm. Recent investments in mega refining and petrochemicals schemes in these clusters well for the further growth of OSC’s shipping capacity.”OSC’s fleet of 49 vessels includes 16 VLCCs, 17 product tankers and 4 chemical carriers.Image Courtesy: Oman Shipping Company (OSC)last_img read more

Assistant coach Knight uses own flaws to instill coaching values at Syracuse

first_imgBrendon Knight didn’t have a team to play for.His junior hockey league team had just lost its final game, and there were no Division I college hockey offers waiting for him. So he drove over 2,000 miles across Canada to Calgary and lived with his uncle while working a dead-end job filling orders in a grocery store warehouse.“I just found myself surrounded by my coworkers that had been working at that job for like 15–20 years and I was looking at them saying to myself, ‘I don’t want to end up like these guys,’” Knight said.SUNY-Potsdam assistant coach Jay Green heard Knight wasn’t playing anywhere and called him. Desperate just to play again, Knight accepted the offer.Twenty years later, Knight is in his third season as an assistant with Syracuse. After playing for the Bears, and then for Isle of Wight Raiders in the England Premier League, Knight began his coaching career. At SU, Knight focuses on the forwards and special teams units, including an improved penalty kill unit that has killed off 86 percent of opponent’s power plays in the last six games.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textKnight teaches his players to not make the mistakes that he made when he played. Though he had trouble with listening to coaches when he was younger, as a coach he’s tried to connect with the players and show them they still have a lot to learn.“He does a good job of showing he knows the game and he’s a caring guy,” SU head coach Paul Flanagan said. “I know he’s created a very good bond with (the players) as a group.”Despite being talented, boasting soft hands and an accurate shot, Knight frustrated a lot of coaches.When Knight would slack off during games, his father, John Knight, would yell “hustle” from the stands. But because no one in Quebec knew what the word meant, they thought John Knight was calling his son an asshole.A stubborn Knight thought he knew more than those trying to help him — including his parents and coaches.“If you’re the biggest fish in the pond, you’re not the biggest fish in the ocean,” John Knight said. “But if you’re the biggest fish in the pond, it’s hard to convince the kid to grow.”Too small for the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League, which he was drafted into at 16, Knight wanted to play for a college in the United States.He received letters from D-I programs including Harvard, but unfamiliar with the NCAA recruiting system, Knight thought they were generic letters and he never followed up on the schools’ inquiries.“I wasn’t exactly the hardest worker off the ice,” Knight said. “I didn’t really put in a lot of time. I relied heavily on my so-called talent, I guess, and that only brought me so far.”At the age of 18, Knight wasn’t playing hockey in Calgary and felt that something was missing.So he had his dad shipped his hockey equipment to him and Knight started playing in a local men’s league. For the first time in his life, he started working out. After just nine months, he started playing for SUNY-Potsdam.Success with Potsdam soothed Knight’s relationship with the sport and after college he spent a year playing in England. For the first time in his career, he was put on the penalty kill and asked to be a two-way player, blocking shots for the first time.Knight was planning for another year in Europe when Potsdam called again about a coaching position. Wanting to extend his career with the sport that had consumed his life, Knight retired from playing in 2002 to start his career behind the bench.After three years coaching at Potsdam, then six at Hamilton, Knight made his way to Syracuse in 2012.Now, he tries to use his own strained relationship with coaches and hot shot mentality from his playing career as a cautionary tale to his current players.“I think that’s the biggest mistake with the young hockey players today, they think that they know it all,” Knight said. “And I’m here to tell them that we don’t … I don’t know if it works all the time but hopefully a couple of them understand that.” Comments Published on January 20, 2015 at 12:07 am Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettus Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Colin Kaepernick wanted $20M to play in AAF, report says

first_img AAF reportedly posts better ratings than top NBA matchup The Alliance of American Football reached out to quarterbacks Colin Kaepernick and Tim Tebow about playing in the spring league, co-founder Bill Polian told The Athletic this week.That’s big news, but Kaepernick’s purported response is eye-popping. Tebow declined to join the league, Polian said. The former NFL QB will be in the Mets’ MLB camp this spring as he pursues a career in baseball.A couple notes after talking to Bill Polian about AAF:1) CEO Charlie Ebersol reached out to Colin Kaepernick about interest in playing in the league. “I don’t know what transpired, but he’s obviously not playing,” Polian said. Polian personally spoke to Tim Tebow, who declined.— Lindsay Jones (@bylindsayhjones) February 14, 2019Kaepernick, the former 49ers quarterback, began kneeling during the national anthem to protest police brutality and racial injustice in 2016. The quarterback opted out of his contract with San Francisco in March 2017 and has not found work in the NFL since.He threw for 72 touchdowns with 30 interceptions during his six seasons with the 49ers. He also rushed for 13 scores and led the Niners to the Super Bowl after the 2012 NFL season. The former 49ers quarterback, 31, wanted $20 million or more to consider playing with the league that started play last weekend, The Associated Press reported, citing an unidentified person with knowledge of the conversation.Neither side has publicly acknowledged the discussions, but Kaepernick’s price tag clearly made him a non-starter — literally and figuratively. AAF players’ non-guaranteed contracts pay them $225,000 over three years, but they also are free beginning in May to pursue NFL careers. Related Newscenter_img Meanwhile, Tebow has been out of the NFL since 2012. The former Florida star, who won the Heisman Trophy in 2007, is currently playing minor league baseball in the Mets organization.Polian and Charlie Ebersol co-founded the AAF in 2018. The league’s inaugural games were last weekend. Former Jets QB Christian Hackenberg struggles in AAF debutlast_img read more