Bereavement raises heart attack risk, says study

first_img Share Share Sharing is caring! HealthLifestyle Bereavement raises heart attack risk, says study by: – January 10, 2012 Sharecenter_img 15 Views   no discussions Tweet The first seven days following bereavement appear to be the most risky in terms of heart healthThe newly bereaved are at greatly increased risk of heart attack after the death of a close loved one, US researchers say.Heart attack risk is 21 times higher within the first day and six times higher than normal within the first week, a study in the Circulation journal of nearly 2,000 people shows. Symptoms to watch for include chest pain and shortness of breath.Experts say intense grief puts extra strain on the heart.The psychological stress associated with loss can raise heart rate, blood pressure and blood clotting, which, in turn, can increase the chance of a heart attack. A person’s sleep and appetite are also likely to be disrupted. Compound this with self-neglect – such as not bothering to take regular medication – and the result can be grave.The researchers say it is important for family and friends to be aware of these risks and to keep an eye out during such difficult times. EmotionalLead investigator Dr Murray Mittleman, of Harvard Medical School’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, said: “During situations of extreme grief and psychological distress, you still need to take care of yourself and seek medical attention for symptoms associated with a heart attack.“Caretakers, healthcare providers and the bereaved themselves need to recognise they are in a period of heightened risk in the days and weeks after hearing of someone close dying.”The researchers reached their estimates by studying 1,985 heart attack survivors and comparing how many of them had recently been bereaved.Among the study participants, 270 (13.6%) experienced the loss of a significant person in the prior six months, including 19 within one day of their heart attack.Heart attack risk went up significantly within the first week after the death of a close loved one. The risk was highest in the first seven days following bereavement and declined steadily thereafter. VulnerableThe elevated risk ranged from about one in 300 to less than one in 1,000 depending on the individual’s general heart health before bereavement. Those with a history of heart disease already fared worse.Prof Peter Weissberg of the British Heart Foundation said: “We’re already aware that, under exceptional circumstances, emotional stress can trigger a heart attack.“But we shouldn’t lose sight of the fact that heart attacks triggered by stress normally only happen in people with underlying heart disease. It’s very important that if you’re taking medication because you have, or are at high risk of, heart disease, don’t neglect taking it following a significant bereavement.”Past research has already shown that recently bereaved people have heart rhythm changes which may make some of them more vulnerable to health problems. And grieving spouses have higher long-term risks of dying, with heart disease and strokes accounting for around half of the deaths, findings suggest. By Michelle RobertsHealth reporter, BBC Newslast_img read more

Alexander: Celebrating, and hanging on to, Dodgers’ Spanish voice Jaime Jarrin

first_img Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies “The first thing Mr. Walter O’Malley did was to hire a helicopter and fly over Los Angeles and see the demographics of Southern California, and he said, ‘Jaime, I am going to give them something in their own language so they can really enjoy the game.’ And I have been fortunate to be the link, to be the spokesperson for the Dodgers and to reach the Hispanic community.”His philosophy is that his listeners work a long, hard day and deserve the enjoyment of a ballgame at its end. Beyond that, he has provided a connection, a way for immigrants to assimilate and an opportunity for a multi-faceted community, with people from many different Central and South American backgrounds, to connect through baseball.He has another role, too, a valuable one for us English-speakers who struggle with Español.“I understand in the Spanish classes at the universities and colleges here, the teachers used to tell them to listen to the Dodgers broadcast in Spanish,” Jarrín said. “Probably they still do.”If they respond to the flight of a home run with “Se va, se va, se va” … yes, that would be a tipoff.jalexander@scng.com@Jim_Alexander on TwitterDodger broadcaster Jaime Jarrin, back, works a game with Fernando Valenzuela. (AP Photo/Jerome T. Nakagawa) Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire center_img “When I started with the Dodgers in 1959 at the Coliseum, the Latinos coming to the ballgames were about eight percent,” he said. “Now, at Dodger Stadium, they tell me it’s around 46 percent Latinos. And if you go during a game and take a walk around the ballpark inside, you will hear as much Spanish as English.”Sign up for our Inside the Dodgers newsletter. Be the best Dodger fan you can be by getting daily intel on your favorite team. Subscribe here.And, as he noted, those fans no longer just sit in the pavilions or the general admission seats at the top of the park, but throughout the stadium.There have been a number of factors, of course, in the uptick in Latino support. The phenomenon that was Fernando Valenzuela made a difference (and Jarrín, as the pitcher’s interpreter to English-speaking audiences, had a part in that, too). A heritage of Spanish-speaking Dodger stars has helped, a list from Manny Mota to Kiké Hernández that includes such luminaries as Pedro Guerrero, Ramón Martínez, Adrián Beltré, Raúl Mondesí, César Izturis, Rafael Furcal and Adrián González.But Jarrín has been the constant in forging that link between the Dodgers and Southern California’s Spanish-speaking community. Thursday’s announcement of a two-year contract extension, meaning that he will continue to do games through at least 2020, and Friday’s Ring of Honor ceremony before the series opener against the Padres further reinforce his importance to the franchise.Is he the Spanish-speaking Vin Scully? Or was Scully the English-speaking Jaime Jarrín? Doesn’t matter. Both are Hall of Famers, dear friends, and indelibly linked with the Dodgers as the only baseball broadcasters to spend six decades with one team.And now Jarrín, at age 82 and blessed with good health, an elegant style and indefatigable enthusiasm, is working a Scully schedule. He skipped three road trips this year, the first time in all these years he’s taken more than a two-week break at midseason, and he will likely do so in future seasons as well.“It’s not that I don’t like traveling,” he said. “I enjoy traveling. I enjoy seeing my friends on the road, seeing my colleagues, talking to them, trying to grasp as much as possible from my colleagues. But leaving my family for such a long time alone, it’s tough. It is getting tougher. My wife, Blanca, she has been a champion. She is the one who really deserves all the accolades.”The backstory by now is familiar. Jarrín arrived in Southern California in 1955, a journey with Blanca that started by boat from Ecuador to Tampa, followed by a cross-country Greyhound trip to L.A.  He knew little about baseball when he arrived but soon became intrigued by the Pacific Coast League, the best L.A. had at the time.When Walter O’Malley brought the Dodgers to town in 1958, Jarrín was the news and sports director of radio station KWKW. The station reached an agreement to do the games in Spanish, Jarrín was given a year to prepare, and in 1959 he started a job that has captivated him all these years.He ticked off three reasons for his longevity:• He still sincerely loves the game. “I can do two games every day, seven days a week,” he said. “I love what I do. I take advantage of the fact I have the best seat in the stadium.”• His wife has been amazingly supportive. And one of his sons, Jorge, is now his partner in the booth.Jorge handles the statistical analysis, while Jaime provides the stories and the historical perspective. If that sounds like Scully … well, for the first eight years KWKW aired the games, before the Spanish broadcasters were allowed to travel, Jarrin would do recreations off of the English broadcasts of Scully and Jerry Doggett. He readily admits he picked up some good habits along the way.• The third reason? “I landed with the Dodgers, an organization that really, really respects my community,” he said.Related Articles LOS ANGELES — There are two ways to measure the impact of Jaime Jarrín, the Spanish language Voice of the Dodgers, on the community that has followed his broadcasts for the last six decades.One is word of mouth.“The best compliment that I have gotten,” he said this week, “is that when I am walking on the streets, when I go into a restaurant, when I am going shopping, people approach me and they tell me, ‘Mr. Jarrín, my grandfather used to hear you every single day. My mother followed the Dodgers thanks to you.’ Then I (say), ‘Well, we grew up together then.’ That hits me very deeply and I am so thankful I had the opportunity to do that.”The other measure? Look at the composition of the crowds in the ballpark. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Arsenal in search of Sanchez tonic at Stoke

first_imgStoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom | AFP | Arsenal head to Stoke City this weekend aiming to register a second victory of the season and divert attention away from continuing questions about the future of Alexis Sanchez.Arsene Wenger’s side kicked off the Premier League campaign in exciting, if not entirely convincing, fashion against Leicester City, coming from behind to register a 4-3 victory thanks to a late Olivier Giroud winner.Sanchez, currently sidelined by an abdominal injury, is out of contract at the end of the season, but despite interest in him from a number of clubs, Wenger would rather lose him for nothing next year than sell him now.“We have to make a choice between efficiency on the field and financial interest and most of the time if you can find a good compromise, it’s better,” said the Arsenal manager.“But in this case, I think I prioritise the fact that he will be useful on the sporting side.”The win over Leicester was the kind of performance that suggested the inconsistencies that dogged Arsenal last term have not gone away.Wenger will hope a repeat of last season’s victory at the bet365 stadium will make a more compelling case for his side to be considered strong title contenders.But their status among the leading clubs will not be confirmed until the transfer window has passed, with Mesut Ozil and Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain among the players who are also out of contract at the end of the season.And as far as Wenger is concerned, Sanchez, Ozil and Oxlade-Chamberlain will stay, even if that means they will be allowed to leave for free at the end of the campaign.For now, Wenger’s focus remains on the trip to Stoke, where Arsenal won for the first time in seven attempts last May. Alexis Sanchez– Jese debut –“We had a convincing win there and that should inspire us,” said the Frenchman.“I don’t believe in bogey teams too much. We had a good performance last season and we have to focus on that, just to deal with the same performance.“Stoke have a good record at home against many teams and I’m convinced that if we play our game, we have a good chance of winning.”Stoke began their testing early-season schedule with a 1-0 defeat at Everton last weekend.Saturday’s meeting with Arsenal is followed by a trip to West Bromwich Albion and a home game against Manchester United.Manager Mark Hughes can at least call upon new signing Jese Rodriguez this weekend after the Spanish striker completed a season-long loan move from Paris Saint-Germain.“I have never had an opportunity like this here so I am very happy to have the chance to show what I can do,” said Jese, who failed to impose himself at PSG after signing from Real Madrid last year.“I want to work hard and help the team. I have chosen Stoke because it is a team that wants to grow and evolve in the Premier League and to reach the European spots.“I feel we have got the right players to reach those objectives and to inspire the Stoke City fans.”Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

Rumson Financial Advisor Facing Investor Lawsuit, Complaints

first_img“(Howley) and his immediate family are among more than 230 investors who were victims of a sophisticated Ponzi scheme perpetrated to defraud investors nationwide of nearly $400 million,” Hansen said in a prepared statement to The Two River Times. A financial advisor with ties to Rumson is facing accusations of wrongdoing. Howley’s home on Rumson Road is currently for sale, listed at $4.5 million. The complaint continues that “Howley used the GCR investment as a selling point for the Guardian Life Insurance policy that earned (Howley) a large stream of commissions.” “My relationship with (Howley) is restricted to running and charitable work,” local restaurateur, philanthropist and Rumson-Fair Haven High School running coach Tim McLoone said in an Aug. 12 inter view. “(Howley) has always been good to our athletes and a supporter of our charitable efforts. There was never any inkling of anything like (these allegations). He’s always been a very, very positive influence on our community.” In 2016, John “Jack” Howley, a founding board member of Rumson’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade, was selected to be its Grand Marshal. Photo by The Two River Times Though five customer disputes are being arbitrated out of court by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, known as FINRA, a Two River-area couple filed a civil complaint in Monmouth County Superior Court in March. Though Howley was never charged by the SEC, the damages requested from complaints filed against him total more than $4.9 million. Howley chose not to comment for this story. But Mary P. Hansen, a partner with the Philadelphia law firm Drinker Biddle, is representing Howley during this legal process and said the allegations contained in the lawsuit “are without merit.” “Like other investors and sophisticated institutions, Mr. Howley placed his trust in Kevin Merrill, who in May admitted under taking the fraudulent Global Credit Recovery scheme, pled guilty to multiple federal criminal charges and is facing a lengthy prison sentence. At no time did Mr. Howley have knowledge of Kevin Merrill’s criminal enterprise or intent to defraud,” Hansen added. In May, GCR’s Kevin B. Merrill, 53, pleaded guilty to conspiracy and wire fraud. GCR operated from 2013 through September 2018. Co-defendants Cameron R. Jezierski, 28, and Jay B. Ledford, 55, pleaded guilty in September for their involvement in the scheme. A Sept. 9, 2018 lawsuit against GCR and Merrill was filed by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in the United States District Court in Maryland. The District Court indicted Merrill and two others Sept. 11, 2018 for conspiracy, identity theft, money laundering and wire fraud. Merrill and GCR’s assets were frozen two days later. According to former Rumson Mayor John Ekdahl, Howley is a “pay-it-forward, giving-back type of guy,” who served on the borough’s recreation committee. Howley also coached recreation and travel basketball and softball and was active in the local track and cross country community. The lawsuit alleges that over the next 15 months Howley recommended the purchase a $6 million life insurance policy from Guardian, a life insurance agency with which Howley has been an advisor since 1983. Howley also suggested an investment in Global Credit Recovery. Guardian could not be reached for comment. Hansen noted that Howley is hopeful the court-appointed arbitrator will soon begin distributing Merrill and GCR’s asset proceeds to investors who were harmed. Rumson resident John “Jack” C. Howley, 58, was discharged from the New York-based Park Avenue Securities Oct. 30, 2018 after failing to disclose private securities transactions and referring clients to investments not offered by the firm. Since the firm severed its ties with Howley, six customer complaints have been levied against him that are still pending decisions. The complaints stem from Howley’s alleged dealings with Global Credit Recovery (GCR), an investment offering the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) labeled a Ponzi scheme in September 2018. Despo’s complaint said that by December 2017 his clients invested a total of $1 million with GCR, an investment that “would be sufficient to pay the premium for the Guardian Insurance.” In 2016, Howley was named the Grand Marshal of the Rumson St. Patrick’s Day Parade, an event he helped found and for which he was a board of trustees member. The lawsuit seeks a total of $1 million in damages from Park Avenue Securities and Howley Financial Group, a financial services firm headed by Howley for 25 years. Its official website is not currently functional. Prior to the pending customer disputes against Howley, which date back to November 2018, the Rumson resident was an active part of the borough community and was celebrated professionally in May 2018 when he was inducted into the Guardian Life Insurance Hall of Fame. “We think we’ve been harmed, and I think we’ll be successful in what we’re seeking,” Despo said when reached by The Two River Times Aug. 5. Howley also organized the first Rumson Opening Day baseball/softball parade, a tradition that continues today. According to the civil complaint, which was submitted on behalf of the Two River-area couple by Rumson attorney William A. Despo, his clients first met with Howley in early 2017 for professional assistance with their investments, life insurance and retirement planning.last_img read more