Fisherman missing in Goa waters

first_imgPANAJI: A 23-year-old fisherman from Chhattisgarh on board a fishing boat went missing on Sunday after accidentally falling into the water around 100 m from the shore off Baina in South Goa on Sunday.The boat carrying eight fishermen was returning to the shore in the morning. Lifeguards of Drishti Lifesaving Services manning the beach were informed about the accident, and were told the fisherman was not wearing a life jacket and didn’t know to swim. The search operation continued throughout the day, said a statement form Drishti on Sunday evening.last_img

Past haunts Dera chief Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh

first_imgFacing allegations of rape from one of his followers, Dera Sacha Sauda chief Gurmeet Ram Rahim Singh, who succeeded Shah Satnam as Dera head in September 1990, is not new to the controversies. Besides the rape case in which the verdict is to be pronounced on Friday, Mr. Singh, 50, also faces allegations of two murders, including that of a journalist, and had also courted controversy for dressing up as Guru Gobind Singh in 2007 leading to widespread protests in Punjab.Mr. Singh, who has directed, produced and acted in five movies over the past two years and composed several albums, first courted controversy in May 2002 when one of his followers levelled allegations of rape against him in an anonymous letter to the then Prime Minister and also sent a copy of the letter to Chief Justice of Punjab and Haryana High Court. Less than two months later, Ranjit Kumar, a former Dera Sacha Sauda management committee member, was murdered on July 10, with the needle of suspicion pointing at the Dera. As Ranjit’s sister was a follower of Dera Sacha Sauda and stayed at its premises, the Dera managers reportedly suspected Ranjit to have prompted his sister to write the anonymous letter.Exactly a month after a CBI investigation was ordered into the allegations made in the anonymous letter on September 24, 2002, Ramchander Chhatrapati, the editor of evening newspaper “Poora Sach”, was shot five times outside his house. The incident led to large-scale protests by media persons across the State and protests were held against Dera Sacha Sauda.Not satisfied with the police investigation, the family of Mr. Chhatrapati and Ranjit’s father moved the Punjab and Haryana High Court seeking a CBI investigation into the two cases and accused the Dera chief of murders. The court clubbed the hearing in the two murder cases and ordered the CBI to register FIRs on November 10, 2003.Violent clashesMr. Singh, who has Z+ security cover, again courted controversy when he dressed himself up as Guru Gobind Singh at a dera in Bhatinda in Punjab in May 2007, leading to violent clashes between his followers and members of the Sikh community across North India.In 2010, former Dera worker Sadhu Ram Kumar Bishnoi moved the High Court seeking CBI probe into mysterious disappearance of Dera’s former manager Fakir Chand. It led to violent protests and arson by Dera followers. The CBI later filed a closure report in the case, but Mr. Bishnoi later challenged the closure report in the court.Hansraj Chauhan, a resident of Tohana, also filed a petition in High Court on July 17, 2012 accusing the Dera chief of castration of 400 sadhus in the Dera and also produced a list of 166 such sadhus.last_img read more

Be more humane, Minister urges J&K police

first_imgLauding the role of the Jammu and Kashmir police in meeting various challenges, Revenue and Relief Minister Abdul Rehman Veeri on Saturday asked the force to adopt a more humanitarian approach while dealing with people.Addressing the Police Commemoration Day Parade function here, Mr. Veeri said the police force was “one of the best” in the country. “You have taken on many roles successfully and people have a lot of expectation from you. You should adopt a [more] humanitarian approach when dealing with common people,” he said at the function skipped by Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti.Mr. Veeri, chief guest at the parade, said Ms. Mufti could not attend as she was not well. Deputy Speaker of Legislative Assembly Nazir Ahmad Gurezi, former Chief Minister Omar Abdullah, Minister of State Mir Zahoor, civil administration and police officers attended the parade.Mr. Veeri recalled the role of the police in disaster management, saying their rescue operations during the 2014 floods were “appreciated by one and all”.DGP S.P. Vaid said the police force was always ready to meet any challenge. Later, they paid floral tributes to the fallen personnel at the police martyrs’ memorial.last_img read more

Invite to Brahma Kumaris draws criticism

first_imgThe government’s decision to invite a member of the Prajapita Brahmakumari to conduct a talk inside the legislative building has come under criticism. Brahma Kumari Shivani, member of the Brahmakumaris World Spiritual University, is scheduled to deliver a ‘motivational speech’ at the Central Hall on Tuesday. The Bramha Kumaris claim to be a worldwide spiritual movement dedicated to personal transformation.Finance Minister Sudhir Mungantiwar said it is a “motivational speech” and should be seen in a positive manner.However, Nationalist Congress Party leader and former deputy chief minister Chhagan Bhujbal questioned it’s purpose. “If it is a religious function, then you will have to allow other religions to hold similar functions,” he said.Calling the legislature building a ‘temple of democracy,’ All India Majlis-e-Ittehadul Muslimeen MLA Imtiaz Jaleel said it should not be used for religious speeches.“The House should be used for formulating laws and rules. Should a Muslim moulavi be called to preach? asked Mr. Jaleel. While announcing his decision to not attend the program, Samajwadi Party MLA Abu Azmi said the move is “unconstitutional and unacceptable”. In 2016, two Jain monks addressed lawmakers inside the Assembly building in Harayana and Madhya Pradesh. The latter was then ruled by the BJP.last_img read more

ScienceShot: Spider Sex Depends on a Third Set of Legs

first_imgSpiders may not have what some men crassly refer to as their third leg, but they can’t get by without the real thing. New research reveals that, without a third set of legs, the male road tarantula (Eupalaestrus weijenberghi) can’t score a mate. The hairy South American spiders use their legs to create vibrations that can be irresistible to females, which live for a decade in contrast to his 60-day lifespan. But it turns out that all of his eight legs aren’t created equal. The third pair from the front is key to completing courtship, apparently because it is perfectly positioned to produce critical vibrations, researchers report in the August issue of the Journal of Arachnology. When they immobilized his third pair by tying it up with a bit of thread, she just wasn’t interested. The bondage experiment marks the first time that scientists have been able to document this leg of the tarantula’s sex life, they note.last_img read more

Problems Mount for Novartis’s Hypertension Drug in Japan

first_imgAn investigative committee under Japan’s ministry of health has confirmed that data in scientific papers resulting from clinical trials of Novartis’s blockbuster hypertension drug Diovan were manipulated, several media outlets have reported today. In its interim report, the committee also called for further investigation to determine if Novartis’s use of the data to promote the drug constitutes false advertising that is prohibited by Japan’s pharmaceutical laws, according to NHK, the quasi-national broadcaster.The ministry of health launched its investigation in August after Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, in Kyoto, and Jikei University School of Medicine, in Tokyo, reported finding evidence of data fabrication in papers reporting the results of clinical trials of Diovan, known generically as valsartan, conducted after it received marketing approval in Japan in 2000 for controlling hypertension. Those clinical trials sought to study whether the drug also helped prevent angina and stroke. Both of the investigations found that a former Novartis employee helped the two universities’ research teams with data analysis, though that person’s link to the company was not disclosed in the papers. The investigations led to the retraction of several papers related to the trials. The lead researcher at the Kyoto school resigned; the Jikei team leader was disciplined. Three other universities that hosted Diovan trials have ongoing investigations.As in the previous probes, the health ministry panel could not conclude who bears ultimate responsibility for the data fabrication. Officials of Novartis, based in Basel, Switzerland, and Novartis Pharma KK, the Japanese subsidiary, have apologized and pledged their cooperation in the continuing investigation.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Dredging up the sea floor kills corals

first_imgToo little food and too much work can stress out corals and leave them vulnerable to disease. The most pervasive family of diseases, called white syndromes, strips corals to mere skeletons of their former vibrancy (as in the image above). A paper published this week in PLOS ONE shows that dredging, the act of shoveling tons of sediment from the sea floor to maintain beaches and build new land, contributes to the spread of diseases like white syndromes by placing corals under intense stress. Researchers used satellite images to study the effects of the Gorgon Project, which dredged about 7.6 million tons of sediment to clear a shipping channel. Corals that were exposed to sediment plumes from 296 to 347 days showed twice as much disease than corals that suffered little to no exposure. Dredging muddied the water, increasing turbidity and blocking out sunlight. Without sunlight, the corals’ symbiotic algae could not photosynthesize to provide the coral with essential nutrients. Sediment that blanketed corals also prevented them from suspension feeding and forced corals to expend energy on sloughing off the muck. Under these stressful conditions, the corals were more susceptible to disease. The researchers hope to further study exactly how diseases like white syndromes latch on to corals as coastal development continues.last_img read more

U.S. agency says 20 coral species are threatened

first_imgWhile protecting five Caribbean and 15 Indo-Pacific corals “marks an important acknowledgement that corals are in trouble,” said CBD’s Miyoko Sakashita, it falls short of what the environmental group had wanted. “There is a little bit of a mixed reaction because there were some corals that we felt deserved protection that didn’t ultimately get it.” According to Melanie Rowland, a retired NOAA attorney and ESA expert not involved in the listing decision, it’s not unusual for an agency to change its mind between its initial proposal and its final decision, especially when there is new research.Now that 20 corals are listed, the question is how to arrest their decline. Threatened status does not automatically restrict activities like fishing or coastal development. However, other federal agencies undertaking projects that could harm corals, such as building ports, must now consult with NOAA first. “Those bigger threats [from] climate change have bigger impacts and harder solutions,” said Mike Tosatto, NOAA’s fisheries administrator for the Pacific Islands. “Land-based impacts of fishing and land-based pollution are generally lesser threats overall, but [they are] something that we might be able to more effectively address.”The agency already has a coral reef conservation program, and it will continue to study climate change impacts to corals while trying to reduce overfishing of reef ecosystems and reduce polluting runoff from land that can cause coral disease. But many scientists fear those steps, by themselves, won’t be enough to save corals. “Without reducing carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere, no amount of good management of these ecosystems is going to save coral reefs,” said Katharine Ricke, a climate scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Palo Alto, California, who has modeled large-scale climate impacts to corals. *Clarification, 10 September, 2:35 p.m.: David Bernhart’s NOAA position has been clarified. Ocean acidification, warming waters, and disease could lead 20 species of Caribbean and Pacific corals to be at risk for extinction by 2100. That argument formed the basis for a decision Wednesday by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to add them to the list of threatened corals under the Endangered Species Act (ESA).   “I don’t think we can make any decision anymore about ESA listings without taking into account the reality that the planet is warming, that the ocean is changing, and will continue to change,” said Russell Brainard, NOAA’s Coral Reef Ecosystem Division chief, in explaining the agency’s action. Two coral species are already listed as threatened, a less protective category than endangered. The agency must now decide how to reduce the stress of those changes on coral species, some of which have declined by 90%.            In 2009, the Center for Biological Diversity (CBD) asked NOAA to list 83 species under the federal law, arguing that each one had declined by at least 30% in 30 years. In 2012, NOAA proposed listing 66 of those petitioned corals as threatened and moving the two species already on the list, the Caribbean elkhorn and staghorn corals (Acropora palmata and Acropora cervicornis), to the most protective category of endangered. David Bernhart, the protected resources chief for NOAA Fisheries’ Southeast region, told reporters yesterday that new information about the abundance of each coral species, their location, and how they respond to threats like pollution and ocean warming led to fewer listings than had been anticipated.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Italian physicist to lead world’s leading particle physics lab

first_imgFabiola Gianotti, an Italian physicist who garnered global attention 2 years ago when she and another physicist announced the discovery of the Higgs boson, has been named the next director-general of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, where that momentous discovery was made. Gianotti will take over for current director-general Rolf-Dieter Heuer on 1 January 2016, the laboratory announced today.CERN boasts the world’s biggest atom smasher, the 27-kilometer-long Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and an annual budget equal to $1.1 billion, making it the de facto global center of particle physics. Gianotti will be the 16th director-general in the laboratory’s 60-year history. She will also be the first woman, which has some leading female particle physicists cheering.”I just sent her a note saying it was the best news I’d ever heard,” says Melissa Franklin of Harvard University. “It makes me proud to be a physicist.” Gianotti’s appointment “is really going to change the feel of CERN for some people,” Franklin predicts. Young-Kee Kim, of the University of Chicago in Illinois, says Gianotti’s appointment is “huge.” “Scientifically, intellectually, and even politically, this is a powerful position,” she says. “This is a fantastic thing.”Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)A staff member at CERN since 1994, Gianotti, 52, has been in the spotlight before. From March 2009 to February 2013 she served as spokeswoman for the 3000 researchers working with ATLAS, one of four gargantuan particle detectors fed by the LHC. In that elected position, she participated in the biggest event in particle physics in decades. On 4 July 2012, she and the representative for the rival detector, CMS, reported at CERN that the two teams had independently discovered the long-sought Higgs boson. That year, Time magazine named Gianotti a runner-up in its annual “Person of the Year” issue.Gianotti’s peers say she’s a first-rank physicist and leader. “Her style is to be incredibly well prepared for everything,” says Franklin, who is a member of the ATLAS team. “And she does it in a very firm but gentle way.” Kim, who also works on ATLAS, notes that Gianotti was involved in the design of the detector from the beginning. “She’s very hands-on,” Kim says.Gianotti has also served on an advisory panel that recently laid out a new road map for particle physics in the United States, Kim notes. So she has a deep understanding of the global enterprise, which should serve her well in charting the lab’s future, says Kim, who served as deputy director of the U.S. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, from 2006 to 2013.One obvious issue that Gianotti will face will be a planned upgrade to the LHC and its detectors around 2022 to 2024, Kim says. That may sound like a long way away, but given the size and complexity of the task, CERN researchers are planning for that project now, she says. Gianotti may also have to lead the lab through the decision on what to do after the $5.5 billion LHC stops running in 2030, Franklin says. That will depend on what, if anything, beside the Higgs boson the LHC produces, she says. Again, given the size and expense of the next great collider, physicists may have to start planning for it relatively soon, Franklin says.In fact, Gianotti seems likely to lead CERN through the most critical period not only in the lab’s history, but also in the history of particle physics. The Higgs boson is the key to physicists’ explanation of how all other fundamental particles get their mass. And it provided the last piece to physicists’ standard model, a mathematical theory of the known particles that is completely self-contained and self-consistent, but which leaves many big questions unanswered—such as, what is the mysterious dark matter whose gravity appears to bind the galaxies?Physicists are hopeful that the LHC—which has been down for repairs since February 2013 and won’t start up again until next spring—will blast out some new, unexpected particle that will point them to a deeper understanding of matter and the universe. But if it doesn’t, then the discovery of the Higgs could mark not a new beginning, but rather the end of the road for accelerator-based particle physics.It all depends on what nature has in store. Which is something that neither Gianotti nor any other physicist can control.last_img read more

As IPCC chair exits, focus moves to who comes next

first_imgThe resignation of Rajendra Pachauri, the chair of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), has focused new attention on the question of who will become the next head of the global body. Pachauri stepped down today amid allegations of sexual harassment by a female colleague, The Guardian reports. Pachauri, who had led the IPCC since 2002, had announced plans to step down this fall, The Daily Climate notes, after the group’s annual meeting in October. A new IPCC chair will be elected at that meeting by the panel’s 195 member nations, which nominate candidates.Among the already declared candidates for the job are Swiss climate scientist Thomas Stocker of the University of Bern and Belgian researcher Jean-Pascal van Ypersele of the Catholic University of Louvain. Potential candidates, The Guardian reports, include Stanford University climate scientist Christopher Field, economist Hoesung Lee of the Korea University Graduate School of Energy and Environment in Seoul, energy economist Nebojsa Nakicenovic of the Vienna University of Technology, and economist Ottmar Edenhofer of the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany. Vice Chair Ismail El Gizouli will be acting IPCC chair until Pachauri’s replacement is elected.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Any new chair will take over IPCC as it considers whether to change its traditional operating style, which involves churning out massive reports written by hundreds of scientists every few years. Some have called for moving to a more nimble, less onerous process.last_img read more

IBM’s Second Home, Half a World Away

first_imgIBM dominated the early decades of computing with inventions such as the mainframe and the diskette. Its offices and factories, stretching from upstate New York to Silicon Valley, were hubs of U.S. innovation long before Microsoft or Google came along.But over the past decade, IBM has shifted its center of gravity halfway around the world to India, making it a high-tech example of the globalization trends that the Trump administration has railed against.The company employs 130,000 people in India — about one-third of its total workforce, and more than in any other country. Their work spans the gamut of IBM’s businesses, from managing the computing needs of global giants like AT&T and Shell to performing cutting-edge research in fields such as visual search, artificial intelligence and computer vision for self-driving cars. One team is even working with the producers of “Sesame Street” to teach vocabulary to kindergartners in Atlanta.“IBM India, in the truest sense, is a microcosm of the IBM company,” Vanitha Narayanan, chairman of the company’s Indian operations, said in an interview at IBM’s main campus in Bangalore, where the office towers are named after U.S. golf courses like Peachtree and Pebble Beach.People wait in the reception area at a Manipal Hospital, a chain working with IBM to develop the Watson artificial intelligence platform for use in diagnosing and treating cancers, in Bangalore. Photo: Philippe Calia/The New York TimesThe work in India has been vital to keeping down costs at IBM, which has posted 21 consecutive quarters of revenue declines as it has struggled to refashion its main business of supplying tech services to corporations and governments.The tech industry has been shifting jobs overseas for decades, and other big U.S. companies like Oracle and Dell also employ a majority of their workers outside the United States.But IBM is unusual because it employs more people in a single foreign country than it does at home. The company’s employment in India has nearly doubled since 2007, even as its workforce in the United States has shrunk through waves of layoffs and buyouts. Although IBM refuses to disclose exact numbers, outsiders estimate that it employs well under 100,000 people at its U.S. offices, down from 130,000 in 2007. Depending on the job, the salaries paid to Indian workers are one-half to one-fifth of those paid to Americans, according to data posted by the research firm Glassdoor.Ronil Hira, an associate professor of public policy at Howard University who studies globalization and immigration, said the range of work done by IBM in India shows that offshoring threatens even the best-paying U.S. tech jobs.“The elites in both parties have had this Apple iPhone narrative, which is, look, it’s OK if we offshore the lower-level stuff because we’re just going to move up,” he said. “This is a wake-up call. It’s not just low-level jobs but high-level jobs that are leaving.”While other technology titans have also established huge satellite campuses in India, IBM has caught the attention of President Donald Trump. At a campaign rally in Minneapolis just before the November election, he accused the company of laying off 500 Minnesotans and moving their jobs to India and other countries, a claim IBM denied.Although he has not singled out the company for criticism since, Trump has tried to curb what he viewed as too many foreigners taking tech jobs from Americans. In April, he signed an executive order discouraging the granting of H-1B temporary work visas for lower-paid tech workers, most of whom come from India. IBM was the sixth-largest recipient of such visas in 2016, according to federal data.The IBM offices at the Manyata Tech Park in Bangalore. Photo: Philippe Calia/The New York TimesIBM, which is based in Armonk, New York, is sensitive to the perception that Americans are losing jobs to Indians. After Trump won the election, IBM’s chief executive, Ginni Rometty, pledged to create 25,000 new U.S. jobs. Rometty, who helped carry out the Indian expansion strategy when she was the head of IBM’s global services division, also has discussed with the new administration plans to modernize government technology and expand tech training for people without four-year college degrees. She also joined one of Trump’s now-defunct business advisory councils.IBM declined to make Rometty or another top executive available for an interview. But the company noted that it is investing in the United States, including committing $1 billion to training programs and opening new offices.Narayanan, who spent 12 years working at IBM in the United States and China before moving to India in 2009, said the company decided where to put jobs based on where it could find enough qualified workers and the customer’s budget. “It’s not as if someone says, ‘Oh, jeez, let me just take these jobs from here and put them there,’” she said.William Lazonick, a professor of economics at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, who has studied the globalization of business, said IBM and other tech companies had benefited greatly from the emergence of a low-cost, technically skilled English-speaking workforce in India.“IBM didn’t create this,” he said. “But IBM would be a totally different company if it wasn’t for India.”IBM, which opened its first Indian offices in Mumbai and Delhi in 1951, is spread across the country, including Bangalore, Pune, Kolkata, Hyderabad and Chennai.Most of the Indian employees work in IBM’s core business: helping companies like AT&T and Airbus manage the technical sides of their operations. Indians perform consulting services, write software and monitor cloud-based computer systems for many of the world’s banks, phone companies and governments.But researchers here also try out new ideas. Looking to build a new system for searching with images instead of words, a team in Bangalore turned to Watson to index 600,000 photos from the world’s top fashion shows and Bollywood movies. In spring, a major Indian fashion house, Falguni Shane Peacock, tried the tool, which helps designers avoid direct copies or even do a riff on an old look, and generated new patterns for three dresses.“It has the capability of doing research in a couple of seconds that would take a long time,” Shane Peacock, who runs the Mumbai firm with his wife, said in an interview.IBM even has a Bangalore “garage” full of app designers who build corporate iPhone and iPad apps to simplify tasks such as helping airline agents rebook passengers, bankers make loans and doctors update patient files.IBM India employees in the company’s offices at the Manyata Tech Park in Bangalore. Photo: Philippe Calia/The New York TimesDuring a recent visit, Ramya Karyampudi, a user experience designer, was at the whiteboard sketching out an app for a smart refrigerator that would solve the universal problem of what to make for dinner.Starting with a drawing of a husband trying to plan a surprise meal for his wife, Karyampudi depicted the internet-connected refrigerator looking at what food was inside, sending over relevant recipes, telling him what extra ingredients he needed to pick up, and playing a video showing him how to cook it all. IBM’s outsize presence in India is all the more striking given that it left the country entirely in 1978 after a dispute with the government about foreign ownership rules.IBM re-entered the country through a joint venture with Tata in 1993, initially intending to assemble and sell personal computers. IBM’s leaders soon decided that India’s potential was far bigger — both as a market and as a base from which to serve customers around the world. The company took full control of the venture, established an Indian branch of its famed research labs, and in 2004, landed a landmark 10-year, $750 million contract from Bharti Airtel, one of India’s biggest phone companies, which remains a major customer.IBM’s chief executive at the time, Samuel J. Palmisano, was so proud of his India initiative that he rented out the grounds of the Bangalore Palace in June 2006, flew out the board, and told a crowd of 10,000 that IBM would invest $6 billion in India over the next three years.India does not just deliver services to IBM’s global clients. It is also a crucial market and the center of IBM’s efforts to help businesses serve the next big slice of customers: the billions of poorer people who have been largely ignored by the tech revolution.For example, teams here have been applying IBM technology to process very small loans so that banks can make a profit on them.IBM has also been working with Manipal Hospitals, a chain based in Bangalore, to adapt Watson to help doctors treat certain cancers. Presented with a patient’s medical history, the system taps into a database that includes advice from doctors at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York to recommend the best treatments — including the price, a big consideration since most Indians lack health insurance.Dr. Ajay Bakshi, Manipal’s chief executive, said the biggest potential for the technology was in rural hospitals with few doctors. Manipal has just begun offering online “second opinions” from Watson for 2000 rupees, or about $31. “It never sleeps. It never forgets. It doesn’t get biased,” he said.IBM executives say projects like these represent the company’s future. “I am looking for India to be my hub for affordable innovation,” Narayanan said.© New York Times 2017 Related Itemslast_img read more

Reprieve for Gautam Navlakha: HC extends interim relief from arrest

first_imgThe Bombay High Court on Tuesday extended the interim relief from arrest till June 26 for activist Gautam Navlakha’s alleged involvement in the Bhima Koregaon violence.A division bench of Justices Ranjit More and Bharati Dangre was hearing a plea filed by Mr. Navlakha urging the court to quash the first information report registered against him by Pune police.In the previous hearing, the Bench was presented with some letters written to Mr. Navlakha by senior Maoist leaders. On perusing them, the court said, “There is nothing against him (Mr. Navlakha) in any of the letters. We are of the prima facie opinion that there is nothing against him based on the documents submitted to us.”Additional Public Prosecutor Aruna Kamat Pai had submitted additional documents seized from Mr. Navlakha’s laptop in a sealed envelope to the court and said they cannot be shared with Mr. Navlakha as the investigation against him in the case is still on.The Bench had remarked, “There is nothing secretive in these documents. We are of the prima facie opinion that these documents can be given to him.”On Wednesday, Ms. Pai said she cannot share the documents with Mr. Navlakha at this stage. The hearing has been adjourned to June 26.last_img read more

4,000 women tie rakhis to BJP MLA Vishvas Sarang

first_imgMore than 4,000 women on Saturday flocked to an open field to tie rakhis to local BJP MLA Vishvas Sarang.As Mr. Sarang entered the field in Subhash Nagar to the thumping beats of Yeh Desh Hai Veer Jawano Ka, waving at women and children with an arm dangling with rakhis, the host announced: “We’ll not call him an MLA today. He is our bhaiyya (elder brother).”Dhurwati Yadav, who has been attending the week-long event since 2009, when it began, said: “Since bhaiyya invited us, we had to come”.After waiting in line 15 minutes, she tied him a rakhi, bearing faces of Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Home Minister Amit Shah. In return, she received a gift — a wallet — and a free meal. Last year, each woman got an umbrella.For the past one week, about 100-150 women BJP workers knocked on each door of the area, part of the Narela constituency that Mr. Sarang represents, to invite women to the event. Mamata Goswami, a worker in-charge of one of the wards, said more than 6,000 invitation receipts were collected, each having the invitee’s name, address and phone number. The invitation read: “It is because of the love and blessings of you sisters that the path of progress undertaken by this brother has lit up”.Surrounded by boys feverishly dancing to the music, she said only women between 18 and 60 are allowed to tie rakhis to the MLA.last_img read more