Lasting damage to young minds left by online porn

first_imgDaily Mail (UK) 8 Sep 2012A leading neuroscientist has backed an opt-in system for online pornography, saying extreme images may cause long-term harm to children’s brains. Baroness Susan Greenfield urged ministers to respect parents’ concerns over uncontrolled internet access. The Oxford University professor said the developing brain was ‘vulnerable’ and that children needed to be protected from premature sexualisation. Already, she said, young people she had spoken to believed ‘relationships are for losers’ and that having multiple sexual partners would impress their friends. The Daily Mail is campaigning for an automatic block on online porn unless over-18s specifically ask their internet service providers to let them see such material, following strict age verification. Baroness Greenfield said: ‘If I had to choose between unfettered internet access, and having children potentially harmed psychologically or worse by porn sites, then for me the decision is an easy one. ‘This [opt in] seems to be the simplest and something simple is easiest for people to deal with. We know that the young brain, because it is still developing, is vulnerable. It is so easily influenced, exposing young people to extreme behaviours like that, might influence it in a way that could be long term.’ Baroness Greenfield said children’s brains may be vulnerable to pornography, as well as suicide and eating disorder sites, on the back of evidence from studies on drug use, video games and criminal behaviour, showing long-term effects from early exposure. On Thursday, a petition signed by 115,000 – including 140 MPs – was handed in to Downing Street, demanding that internet service providers block online porn.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2200103/Lasting-damage-young-minds-left-online-porn-Brain-expert-warns-children-protected-extreme-images.htmllast_img read more

New CYF complaints authority

first_imgNZ Herald 11 Oct 2012Complaints against social workers could be handled by a new independent authority by 2014.The change is one of the possible outcomes of a review into best practice that has been planned in the Government’s White Paper.At present, complainants can ask the Ministry of Social Development to take their complaints, made directly to the ministry, to an external advisory panel.The panel is meant to give an impartial review and report recommendations to the ministry’s chief executive.An independent body would receive and process complaints rather than going through the ministry.According to the White Paper, an independent review would recommend the best practice for handling complaints next year, to be put into place by the end of 2014.Social Development Minister Paula Bennett said the review would consider whether Child, Youth and Family needed something similar to the Independent Police Conduct Authority to consider complaints about it.The White Paper also sets out a goal to improve CYF’s workforce.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=10839713last_img read more

Heavy and Incompatible Drinking Can Increase the Chances of Divorce

first_imgScience Daily 5 Feb 2013High levels of drinking have repeatedly been shown to predict divorce. The most cited explanation for this is that excessive alcohol use disrupts daily tasks and functioning, and increases spousal conflicts. A study of the effects of drinking among husbands versus wives, and of similar versus dissimilar drinking in couples, has found that both level of drinking and compatibility in drinking can have an influence on divorce.Results will be published in the May 2013 issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research and are currently available at Early View. “On average, divorced people drink more than married people,” said Fartein Ask Torvik, a researcher at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health as well as corresponding author for the study. “To some extent, this is due to increased drinking after a divorce, but people who drink heavily also have a higher risk of experiencing a divorce, so heavy drinking likely interferes fundamentally with the quality of marriage.”…”Essentially, the more people drink, the higher is the risk of divorce,” said Torvik. “In addition, the risk of divorce is lowered if the spouses drink approximately the same amount of alcohol. This is not only true for those who drink excessively — there is also a reduced risk of divorce if both spouses abstain totally from alcohol. Also, we found heavy drinking among women to be more strongly associated with divorce than heavy drinking among men.””This latter finding is of major interest,” said Major. “For instance, the risk of divorce is estimated to be tripled when the husband’s level drinking is low and the wife’s drinking is heavy, compared with couples where both drink lightly.””There are several possible explanations for this,” said Torvik. “One of them is that women in general seem to be more strongly affected by heavy drinking than men are. Thus, heavy-drinking women may be more impaired than heavy-drinking men. It is, however, important to note that heavy drinking is much less common among women than among men.””Heavy drinking among women is also less acceptable than among men in our society,” said Major. “A wife’s heavy drinking probably also interferes more with general family life — that is, the caring role of the mother, upbringing of children, etc.http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/02/130205162519.htmlast_img read more

Bid to reopen bottle shop near school sparks anger

first_imgStuff.co 6 August 2013Opponents of a planned Porirua liquor store have told of the harm alcohol has caused in the area.Plans for a new bottle store across from Waitangirua’s Russell School – on the same site as a previous outlet – have unleashed a fresh wave of anger.About 100 people marched in Porirua yesterday against the proposal, before a Liquor Licensing Authority hearing.Empty cans were strewn about, vandalism was common, and children could not play barefoot because of the danger of broken glass, said Russell School board of trustees chairman Matt Crawshaw.“It has been an absolute injustice for our children to grow up with this liquor store across the road from their school.” Last year, his family’s pet chicken was killed by people who were drunk and hungry – “an example of the damage and harm we endured in our neighbourhood” before Thirsty Liquor closed at the end of April when the lease for its Fantame St store was terminated.Russell School principal Sose Annandale had concerns about the safety of students and staff. Abuse was common, as was graffiti, and they often found bottles with alcohol still in them.“This continued until April this year.”Porirua police alcohol harm reduction officer Senior Sergeant Steve Sargent said that since the previous store’s  hours were cut and it was closed, crime had dropped by 31 per cent in the Fantame St area.http://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/9005014/Bid-to-reopen-bottle-shop-near-school-sparks-angerlast_img read more

UK Parliament rejects ban on gendercide abortions

first_imgLifeSiteNews 24 February 2015Britain’s House of Commons rejected a bill aiming to ban sex-selective abortion on Monday in a vote of 292-201.The lower chamber passed the bill at first reading on November 4, but yesterday lawmakers instead approved a measure calling for an inquiry into the prevalence of gender-based abortion in Wales, England, and Northern Ireland.Tory MP Fiona Bruce’s landmark Abortion (Sex-Selection) Bill sought to clarify “that nothing in section one of the Abortion Act 1967 allows a pregnancy to be terminated on the grounds of the sex of the unborn child.”Bruce’s bill was strongly opposed by labor unions and some Labor Party politicians on the grounds that bill would “divide communities.”A letter circulated to Labor MPs by the Trade Union Congress (TUC) said that banning sex selective abortions might leave women “vulnerable to domestic abuse,” and that “the amendment does not attempt to address the root causes of deeply entrenched gender discrimination but rather has divided communities.”https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/uk-parliament-rejects-ban-on-gendercide-abortionslast_img read more

French woman wants to marry a robot as expert predicts sex robots to become preferable to humans

first_imgNZ Herald 24 December 2016Family First Comment: Just when you thought it couldn’t get wackier…“The “proud robosexual” said she always loved the voices of robots as a child but realised at 19 she was sexually attracted to them as well. Physical relationships with other men confirmed the matter.” But this quote from an ‘expert’ on robot / human love sums it up…. “The future has a habit of laughing at you. If you think love and sex with robots is not going to happen in your lifetime, I think you’re wrong.”No sir. The future will laugh at itself!!#thisismarriage’equality’On the surface, Lilly seems like a blushing young woman ready to marry the man of her dreams who makes her “totally happy.”Only her partner is 3D printed robot named Inmmovator who she designed herself, after realising she was attracted to “humanoid robots generally” rather than other people.“I’m really and totally happy,” she told news.com.au over email in her tentative English. “Our relationship will get better and better as technology evolves.”The “proud robosexual” said she always loved the voices of robots as a child but realised at 19 she was sexually attracted to them as well. Physical relationships with other men confirmed the matter.“I’m really and only attracted by the robots,” she said. “My only two relationships with men have confirmed my love orientation, because I dislike really physical contact with human flesh.”She has since built her own dream man with open-source technology from a French company, and has lived with him for one year. They are ‘engaged’ and plan to marry when robot-human marriage is legalised in France.READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=11772407Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

End of Life Choice Bill – 1st Reading – Simon O’Connor (National)

first_imgI believe this is a sad day for the House. We are here talking about the State sanctioning killing of New Zealanders. This bill suggests that suicide is a solution under certain circumstances, and I stand today to reject this.I spent two and a bit years chairing the Health Committee as over 21,000 Kiwis from across the spectrum spoke to us, and 80 percent, who had well considered it, said no. I’ve studied philosophy and human rights, I’ve been at hospital beds and hospices, I’ve seen more death and suffering than sometimes I care to remember, and, fundamentally, I do not believe doctors should be killing their patients.Members of the House, this bill is about killing in two ways. The first is called euthanasia. It’s where the doctor takes an injection, usually something like phenobarbital, and injects it into you—only after they’ve sedated you, of course; couldn’t have the inconvenience of twitching. The other is physician-assisted suicide, where, again, they give you a massive dose of drugs. You take that yourself, at your own choosing—and hope that the kids don’t find it in the medical cabinet at the time.This bill combines both of those. That’s almost unheard of in any other jurisdiction around the world. This bill before us tonight is the worst example of euthanasia legislation in the world. I say that as someone who has looked at every piece of legislation.Where it starts, really badly, is clause 4. We hear it a lot: it’s all about terminal illness, up to six months. But the doctors, the medical people, will tell you that six months is just an indication; it’s not a guarantee. And the doctors will tell you too that they misdiagnose all the time.They also talk in this bill about irremediable, grievous conditions. That’s incredibly broad, undefined. What is “irremediable”? What is “grievous”? Basically, it includes everyone, including those with disabilities.But the bill also, rather insidiously, talks about suffering that a person deems intolerable—what you deem intolerable. Sorry, Mr Speaker—what members may deem intolerable. This is a clear indication that it is the courts who will be making decisions and choices, not this Parliament and certainly not the person.In the debate in this space, I’ve often said, it’s between choice and public safety. Let’s be very clear: the current laws as they stand mean that no one will die against their will, but this proposed law that we consider tonight will make involuntary deaths possible. We know in this House we do not make things perfect, because changing this law will allow some to assist the suicide—well, sorry. People who choose to assist in suicide will put others at risk.We know that this law applies to everyone. It does not apply simply to the rational and articulate; it applies to the elderly, the disabled, the sick, the vulnerable—all of us. Not everyone is fortunate enough to live with a loving, caring family. Not everyone has a doctor fully in tune with them and their needs. This law will apply to the depressed, the lonely, those who feel a burden, the disabled, the fearful. I should point out that these are the same feelings of a 16-year-old who is keen to suicide, the 40-year-old who has lost their farm, or the 80-year-old on the deathbed.I repeat again, as I did a few months back, that you cannot stand in this House and decry the suicide of one group of people—say, the youth—and then encourage the suicide of another group—say, the sick. They are the same feelings that are there. And I don’t say it alone. It’s very easy for the media and others to attack, but, actually, this is the opinion of the major medical groups, the psychologists, and the youth workers. I add their voice tonight.There’s a lot of talk about choice. Let me say one thing about choice: the patient in this space never makes the choice. If they did, there wouldn’t need to be doctors and psychologists and boards and panels. The doctors make the choices. The family makes the choices.If you think I’m exaggerating, go and look up an example in the Netherlands recently. A woman with dementia who, yes, years ago, had said that she would like to die by assisted suicide, was held down after being sedated by her doctor and family—they put drugs in her tea. They sedated her, held her down as she screamed and yelled, and then they killed her. The doctor was able to report it, and they just said, “Oh, well, you acted in good faith, but she’s dead now.” So much for the choice and autonomy that she exercised.And I’d point out too that if it’s about choice and autonomy, we all have it. If it’s a human right, all humans have it. There is a slippery slope, and one only needs to turn to Canada, which has already been mentioned, which is already pushing the boundaries.There are no safeguards; there are just lots of criteria. Being 18 is not a safeguard. All the reporting comes after the fact. If you get it wrong, the person’s still dead.Doctors don’t want to be part of this. The few that do will make a business of it, and there will be doctor-shopping. The conscience rights in this bill are a nonsense. If you oppose, the doctor must hand that person over to someone who will.It’s a very, very poor bill, and, fundamentally—thousands of health professionals and others have argued in the recent public debate—this is an issue where the public safety will be put at risk. So I ask this House how many involuntary deaths and errors are we willing to accept through this law: one, five, 10—last_img read more

Children’s Minister Tracey Martin wants online pornography to be regulated

first_imgNZ Herald 10 August 2018Family First Comment: This is exactly what an expert panel on the harms of pornography would investigate. (But we’re still waiting on the politicians to respond !)www.PornInquiry.nzNew Zealand could follow the United Kingdom in bringing in age restrictions for online pornography and blocking websites which refuse to comply.Department of Internal Affairs Minister Tracey Martin, who also holds the children’s portfolio, says young people are being “bombarded” by internet pornography and she wants censorship laws to be strengthened.“This is a really, really big issue to New Zealand and we are going to have a serious conversation about it,” she told the Herald.“And I hope to make sure we have this conversation in this term of Government.”Martin supports the approach of the United Kingdom, which has ambitious – and controversial – plans to introduce mandatory age verification for pornographic websites later this year.She made the comments after the Chief Censor began a major piece of research on New Zealand teenagers’ online pornography habits. Expected to be completed in December, the research will be used to inform Government policy, including possible regulation.READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=12104188&ref=twitterlast_img read more

Bereavement raises heart attack risk, says study

first_img Share Share Sharing is caring! HealthLifestyle Bereavement raises heart attack risk, says study by: – January 10, 2012 Sharecenter_img 15 Views   no discussions Tweet The first seven days following bereavement appear to be the most risky in terms of heart healthThe newly bereaved are at greatly increased risk of heart attack after the death of a close loved one, US researchers say.Heart attack risk is 21 times higher within the first day and six times higher than normal within the first week, a study in the Circulation journal of nearly 2,000 people shows. Symptoms to watch for include chest pain and shortness of breath.Experts say intense grief puts extra strain on the heart.The psychological stress associated with loss can raise heart rate, blood pressure and blood clotting, which, in turn, can increase the chance of a heart attack. A person’s sleep and appetite are also likely to be disrupted. Compound this with self-neglect – such as not bothering to take regular medication – and the result can be grave.The researchers say it is important for family and friends to be aware of these risks and to keep an eye out during such difficult times. EmotionalLead investigator Dr Murray Mittleman, of Harvard Medical School’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, said: “During situations of extreme grief and psychological distress, you still need to take care of yourself and seek medical attention for symptoms associated with a heart attack.“Caretakers, healthcare providers and the bereaved themselves need to recognise they are in a period of heightened risk in the days and weeks after hearing of someone close dying.”The researchers reached their estimates by studying 1,985 heart attack survivors and comparing how many of them had recently been bereaved.Among the study participants, 270 (13.6%) experienced the loss of a significant person in the prior six months, including 19 within one day of their heart attack.Heart attack risk went up significantly within the first week after the death of a close loved one. The risk was highest in the first seven days following bereavement and declined steadily thereafter. VulnerableThe elevated risk ranged from about one in 300 to less than one in 1,000 depending on the individual’s general heart health before bereavement. Those with a history of heart disease already fared worse.Prof Peter Weissberg of the British Heart Foundation said: “We’re already aware that, under exceptional circumstances, emotional stress can trigger a heart attack.“But we shouldn’t lose sight of the fact that heart attacks triggered by stress normally only happen in people with underlying heart disease. It’s very important that if you’re taking medication because you have, or are at high risk of, heart disease, don’t neglect taking it following a significant bereavement.”Past research has already shown that recently bereaved people have heart rhythm changes which may make some of them more vulnerable to health problems. And grieving spouses have higher long-term risks of dying, with heart disease and strokes accounting for around half of the deaths, findings suggest. By Michelle RobertsHealth reporter, BBC Newslast_img read more

Russian airline suspends service to Jamaica

first_img Sharing is caring! 86 Views   no discussions Share KINGSTON,Jamaica (CMC) – The recent political developments between Russia and Ukraine, has led to the suspension of service provided by Transaero Airlines.On Thursday, the Ministry of Tourism announced that Transaero will be suspending service between Moscow and Montego Bay, effective March 28, with a resumption of service set for November.This development has been attributed to “dramatic currency fluctuations in Russia, their impact on airline operations and recent political developments.”As a direct result of this development, the tourism ministry says the Jamaica Tourist Board’s (JTB) Regional Director in Europe, has been dispatched to Moscow “to keep in touch with the market and to protect the gains we have made there.”The airline began its Jamaica service in the winter of 2012/13. At the time it was welcomed as a major boost to the tourist trade from that part of the world. It was so successful that the airline opted to maintain the service through the entire year.However, in light of these recent political developments, Transaero has revealed it is not confident in its ability to maintain the same level of service this year.Caribbean Media Corporation BusinessLifestyleTravel Russian airline suspends service to Jamaica by: – March 21, 2014center_img Tweet Share Sharelast_img read more